Egypt
New Valley

Here you’ll find travel reports about New Valley. Discover travel destinations in Egypt of travelers writing a travel blog on FindPenguins.

30 travelers at this place:

  • Day8

    Valley of the Kings

    May 15 in Egypt ⋅ ☀️ 39 °C

    This morning was very special. We got up at 3.15 am to go ballooning over the Valley of the Kings. All I can say is “wow”!

    We were in a basket with a bunch of giggling Japanese girls, some Brits, an Aussie and a delightful Brazilian guy.

    Our balloon was the first one up, and we soared high above the other balloons, then rotated to view the Nile and the Valley of the Kings and the Valley of the Queens. Hatshepsut’s Temple was large and spectacular.

    Watching the sunrise over the Nile was surreal.

    We landed in a desert region just before 6am, and the process of the team to pack up was amazing. Little boys came surging toward us on donkeys, but our ballon pilot warned us not to give them money, as they would start fighting if they all didn’t get some...

    We were collected by Hany and our driver, and had our packed breakfast in a cafe, with hot sweet mint tea, which was delicious! Then, off to our next adventure...
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  • Day8

    Part two: Valley of the Kings

    May 15 in Egypt ⋅ ☀️ 39 °C

    After breakfast, we headed to the Valley of the Kings. So called because over sixty Pharoahs were entombed here. The day was very hot - at 6.30am is was already 36 degrees, so we had to pace ourselves. We entered three tombs here, unfortunately the tomb of Tutankhamen was not one of them.

    The first tomb was of Rameses IV, it was very colourful and short, as he died not long into the building of the tomb, which starts on their day of accession, until 70 after their death (the length of time of the mummification process). Some of the tombs are larger, and deeper with lots of elaborate glyphs and colour.

    Tutankhamen ‘s tomb was undiscovered until 1922 due to having a later pharoah’s tomb built on top. His mummified remain are inside, the only ones left in situ. Photos are not allowed inside, even with the exorbitant photography pass!
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  • Day2

    Memnon-Kolosse

    November 27, 2018 in Egypt ⋅ ⛅ 23 °C

    Die Memnonkolosse sind zwei nebeneinander stehende altägyptische Kolossalstatuen aus dem 14. Jahrhundert v. Chr. Sie befinden sich im Niltal unweit des Tals der Könige in Theben-West. Die Statuen befanden sich in der Vergangenheit vor den Pylonen des Eingangs zum Tempel des Amenophis III. (ägyptischAmenhotep III.), eines Pharaos der 18. Dynastie.Read more

  • Day2

    Hatschepsut, Ägypten

    November 27, 2018 in Egypt ⋅ ⛅ 19 °C

    Der Totentempel der Hatschepsut stammt aus der 18. Dynastie und ist der am besten erhaltene Tempel in Deir el-Bahari am Westufer des Nil in Theben. Auffällig ist seine eigenwillige Architektur. Die Pylone sind durch offene Pfeilerhallen am Anfang je einer Terrasse ersetzt. Der gesamte Tempel ist aus Kalkstein errichtet.
    Bild 1: Osiris-Säulen
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  • Day2

    Tal der Könige, Ägypten

    November 27, 2018 in Egypt ⋅ ☁️ 13 °C

    Das Tal der Könige – gelegen in der Nähe des altägyptischen Theben, heute etwa 5 km nordwestlich des Zentrums der oberägyptischen Stadt Luxor – war eine Nekropole im Alten Ägypten, in der bis heute 64 Gräber und Gruben aufgefunden wurden.

  • Day2

    Hathor-Kapelle

    November 27, 2018 in Egypt ⋅ ⛅ 20 °C

    Links neben der Punthalle (Goldland=Punt)des Hatschepsut-Tempels gibt es einen kleinen Portikus vor der Hathor-Kapelle. Die mittleren Säulen sind mit Hathor-Kapitellen geschmückt. Dieser Portikus öffnet sich innen in ein Vestibül, durch das man in die Säulenhalle der Kapelle gelangt. 

  • Day11

    Valley of the Kings/Temple of Hatshepsut

    January 19 in Egypt ⋅ 🌫 4 °C

    Off to the West Bank today to visit the Valley of the Kings. Photos are very limited unless you buy the photo ticket for 300 LE. As our entry ticket only included 3 tombs, I opted out and spent 250 LE instead to visit the tomb of King Tut where his mummy lies in an environment controlled glass (or some other clear material) box. But let's save Tut for later.

    The valley was hidden for a long time from the general public back then to protect the tombs of the kings from looters, but these tombs required a lot of workers. So how was it kept a secret for so long? Well, we tossed around a few (and cruel) ideas, but it turns out the 1st king built a village on the far side of the valley for the artisans, workers and their families so that they could live there and never return to the East Bank to tell anyone.

    I think the Valley of the Kings has one of the best visitor centres. There's a full model showing the valley and the locations of the tombs underneath so you could see how deep and how long each was. Today, we would visit the tombs of Tausert/Setnakht, Ramses III and Merenptah. Each of these tombs had colored hieroglyphics in their tunnels and burial chambers, some still quite vivid. My favorite was that of Ramses III, there was just something about the decor in the tunnel leading down into the chamber.

    The story of Tausert and Setnakht is an interesting one. Long story short, Queen Tausert first rested there, and Setnakht was cutting his tomb somewhere else, when he ran into a problem where this tomb would break through the walls of another king, so he looked nearby and decided to take over that of Tausert. Merenptah would later cut his tomb from where Setnakht originally left off, but shifted the tunnel over as to not break the wall of another tomb. At least, that's what my memory recalls. Our guide also trained as an Egyptologist so he was full of information.

    Leaving the Valley of the Kings, we headed to the Temple of Queen Hatshepsut, another impressive complex where we had plenty of time to wander. Where we hadn't taken photos of colored hieroglyphics earlier, we certainly could here.
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  • Day2

    Tal der Könige, Ägypten

    November 27, 2018 in Egypt ⋅ ☁️ 16 °C

    Grabkammer von Ramses lll

  • Day29

    Day 28: Valley of the Kings

    April 2, 2011 in Egypt ⋅ ☀️ 31 °C

    Early start again to visit one of the highlights of Egypt, the Valley of the Kings. This is where all the ancient pharoahs were buried, hidden away in giant crypts dug into the desert. Luxor was the ancient capital (aka Memphis), and this was their burial ground. I actually didn't take any photos, since photography inside the temples isn't permitted, and outside isn't actually very interesting (just cave-style doorways, essentially). Inside was beautiful though, the colours of the paintings are incredible and it's difficult to believe they've been preserved so perfectly for several thousand years.

    We visited the tomb of Tutankhamun, but it's surprisingly small compared to many others. Later on we also visited the giant temple of Queen Hapshepsut built into a nearby cliff.
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You might also know this place by the following names:

Muḩāfaz̧at al Wādī al Jadīd, Muhafazat al Wadi al Jadid, New Valley, محافظة الوادي الجديد, UVL

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