India
Bommanahalli, Hosur Road

Here you’ll find travel reports about Bommanahalli, Hosur Road. Discover travel destinations in India of travelers writing a travel blog on FindPenguins.

2 travelers at this place:

  • Day9

    Wedding Reception

    February 23 in India β‹… πŸŒ™ 25 Β°C

    If there is a good side to our hotel (apart from the price) it's definitely the location: we literally have to cross a street (including some piles of rubbish, unidentified non-dead reptiles and dozens of non-vaccinated stray dogs) to reach the wedding venue: the White Houzz (yes, it's spelled like this...πŸ˜•). And considering that neither Ludo nor I have Swiss punctuality among our main skills, it's definitely a plus...
    I decide to wear my brand-new orange saree for the reception, but soon realise that I am not able to drap it alone and YouTube tutorials are not of much help πŸ˜₯. Luckily, in the hotel lobby we find somebody who speaks English (or at least understands some words of what we are saying) and they send to our room a tiny woman who silently helps me wear the saree and refuses any form of compensation.

    It's exactly 7.30pm when we reach the White Houzz: as the name suggests, the building is completely white but has been decorated with some heavily-coloured flowers and ornaments. The result is a Bollywood-style gold&pink reception hall! 🀷🏼‍♀️
    Vishnu and Aish are on the stage and are taking pictures with their guests, who can reach the stage only after queueing up in a very long line. The wedding hall is still quite empty and I can only recognise a couple of familiar faces: my colleagues Shota, Paul and Yoana as well as Wesley, who used to work for Experteer until 3 years ago. Apparently all the others are staying at the Ibis hotel and it's taking them much longer than expected to reach the venue.
    After lining up with the rest of the guests, we reach the stage and can finally greet Vishnu and Aish as well as their parents. They all seem truly happy to have us all there.
    When the rest of our colleagues finally arrive, we learn that they got stuck in Bangalore's traffic and it took them over an hour to reach the White Houzz. As usual, the Google Maps prediction (15 minutes by car) was quite off...
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  • Day9

    After-Reception Drinks

    February 23 in India β‹… πŸŒ™ 21 Β°C

    As it's not even 10pm by the time we are all done eating, the Experteer group moves to a var for a drink, but not before picking up our wedding bonbonnière: a bag containing a coconut! Yes, a real one... πŸ₯₯😍
    Fearing tomorrow morning we will be totally destroyed due to the lack of sleep, Ludo and I decide to leave the bar, but on the way to our hotel we realise we are super thursty and decide to stop at a McDonald's for a smoothie. As soon as we enter the restaurant, all the customers turn around staring at us... I guess we are the most-elegant (and, as usual, palest) guests of the whole McDonald's 😁
    Leaving aside people's reaction to our presence, our main problem is actually swallowing our drinks: both smoothies ar by far too sweet, since - as usual - they must have randomly added sugar and syrups to already sweet ingredients. πŸ˜”

    After a good half an hour, we wisely decide to make a move and start walking towards the hotel crossing the abandoned mall and zigzagging through stray dogs. We surprisingly reach our beautiful hotel completely unscathed and use the time to call our families. The result is that we end up going to bed super late with an early wake-up call tomorrow morning. I just hope we will hear the alarm clock... ⏰😭
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  • Day10

    Wedding Ceremony

    February 24 in India β‹… β˜€οΈ 31 Β°C

    When the alarm clock rings at 6am we deeply regret not going straight to bed after dinner yesterday night: we started the post-reception evening with the problem of not knowing how to kill time and ended up going to bed at 2am...
    Today's programme is quite vague and since none of us has ever attended an Indian wedding before, we are totally unprepared in what to expect. According to the programme, at the wedding vanue breakfast will be served between 6.30 and 8am, while lunch will start at 11.30am. Sometime between (or during?πŸ™„) there should be a long religious marriage ceremony meant to be a mix of the traditions of the two birth regions of the spouses (no, they don't come from the same place... and no, they don't even speak the same language... but yes, they are both Hinduist).

    Realistically, we aim to be at the wedding house no earlier than 7.30/8am and I assume the rest of the European group will do the same. While I am getting ready, Ludo brings our bags (which doubled in number since our arrival one week ago) to the wedding venue and then comes back for me. In the hotel there is nobody able to help me wearing the saree (or, more likely, they didn't understand a word of our request) so I just put it on randomly and go to the White Houzz where Vaidehi will help me fixing it.
    We were right: most of the attendees have either just shown up or still have to arrive: only a couple of very diligent Germans was at the wedding venue already at 6.30am. So we have plenty of time for our breakfast.. also because apparently the priest is late!!! πŸ˜…

    If yesterday the reception dinner was quite "westernised" both in terms of dress code and dining facilities, today everything will be strictly traditional. In other words, we will have to eat with our bare hands as Indians don't use cutlery! Having that in mind, as a precaution, I steal from the breakfast buffet two plastic teaspoons (allowed for this meal as there is the traditional veggie curry soup I learnt to love over the past days) and hide them in my clutch. They will be probably very valuable at lunch time...πŸ€”

    Vaidehi asked me to meet in a changing room to drap my saree, but didn't specify where it is located. I start exploring the hall looking for potential changing rooms and I end up in a messy stock room, followed by a creepy toilet... and then, finally, a big changing room. The problem is that it was not empty... There were the Hindu priests and the groom in his underwear 😣😣😣 I literally run out hoping not to have been recognise and I finally stumble upon Vaidehi, who finally fixes my saree.

    After 8am all the wedding guests come up to the main hall, where a flower-decorated and highly-colourful stage has been set up in front of endless rows of chairs. Despite our readings last night, unfortunately we don't understand much of the ceremonies themselves and basically follow the bride and the groom with their priest-bodyguards in and out the wedding house. All this goes on for about 3 hours, with an uninterrupted background of ear-perforating drum music. 😱

    Leaving aside the terrible headache, the atmosphere is truly special: there are fresh colourful flowers everywhere and the bride wears a stunning ivory silk saree and plenty of elaborated jewellery. Male costumes are instead much less elegant. Vishnu is wearing a weird loose white toga revealing a good portion of the upper-part body, while his father-in-law is even less lucky: the poor man is basically naked apart from a sort of awkward white nappy. I guess how thrilled he must have been when learning that his daughter was going to get married, knowing what was going to await him... πŸ˜₯

    When the ceremony is finally over, we all go down to the dining hall, where we are asked to sit at long tables. As expected, there is no cutlery but we are still generously allowed to have a spoon, since one of the serves consists in a sort of spicy soup. No need to say that I use the spoon to eat everything I have on the plate, receiving the immediate reproach of the locals, who proudly plunge their hands into the sauces and mix everything with rice before putting the resulting pudding-like thingy into their mouths... 😳

    At 1pm we are already done and, after thanking the newly-married couple (and sneakily avoiding a second round of luck-bringing coconuts) we go back to the changing room to get rid of our traditional dresses and wear our usual torn travelling clothes. Before leaving for the airport we still have a couple of errands to run: pick up Ludo's glasses and buy some spices (and A LOT of water in a supermarket). Let's see how we manage...
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  • Day9

    Bangalore Adventures (Part 2)

    February 23 in India β‹… 🌬 32 Β°C

    After our super tight 7-day tour programme, we can finally spoil ourselves with a slow start of the day. The wedding reception won't start until 7.30pm, so we have the whole day to do some last-minute shopping and take some time to rest. Or, at least, that was the plan...

    As soon as we get up, we realise that our programme might have to be slightly changed: there is no running water in the bathroom... Toilet flush included! πŸ˜₯
    This is a whole new stage of adventurousness and is actually too challenging even for us, to the point that we start thinking of changing hotel. Before taking extreme measures, I convince Ludo to talk to the receptionist... and result is beyond expections! After our complaint, the hotel manager sends a poor lad to the move some pipes (!!!) on the roof (!!!!!!!!!). And within half an hour water is actually back... We wonder if, by moving the roof pipes, we are now getting the water originally destinated to another house... But maybe we should just stop askiing ourselves questions altogether 😐

    By the time water is back its already past midday and we decide to postpone our shower to the evening: now it's shopping time! πŸ›οΈπŸ’°
    Since we missed breakfast, we decide to have a coffee and something to nibble at the usual Coffee Day. Apart from yesterday's one, there is another café only 20 minutes away (walking) in a commercial street that - still according to Google Maps, should be full of silk shops.

    As soon as we get out of the hotel, we realise that we might have to review our plan: the heat is unbearable and walking under the sun will require much more time (and sweat) than we thought. As we feared, after just a few hundred meters we are craving for some form of air conditioning and we find shelter in a men's clothing and accessories shop, where Ludo buys another tie, a belt and a stunning silk gilet. If we go on like this, when we return to Munich our bank accounts will be scary to look at... πŸ’°πŸ€¦πŸΌ‍♀️
    Thanks to the unplanned stop we have regained the energy to proceed in our mission towards Coffee Day. However, when we finally reach the location marked on Google Maps, there is no sign of our beloved coffee chain... 😰 Out of despair, we ask some locals (Coffee Day seems to be so popular here that they don't need to speak a word of your language to understand what you are talking about) and after a further 10-minute walk we finally reach our long-craved destination.

    After a latte macchiato (and a fresh coconut), we are finally all set for our shopping adventure. We would like to buy some silk scarves like the ones we got in Mysore, but the ones they seem to have in Bangalore are far away from that quality level. To make up for it, we end up buying two dresses, some bangles and bracelets.
    Yes, shopping in India is really really dangerous... πŸ’ΈπŸ’ΈπŸ’ΈπŸ˜­

    By the time we are back in the hotel is already almost 6pm: we only have just over an hour to get ready for the wedding reception!
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  • Day9

    Wedding Dinner

    February 23 in India β‹… πŸŒ™ 22 Β°C

    When everybody has posed for the pictures with the bridal couple, we can proceed to the lower floor of the building, where the reception dinner is held. It turns out to be a sort of school canteen with a buffet set up on some tables along the perimetral walls. The food is as usual super yummy (and vegetarian), but surprisingly there are only three round tables, so we end up eating while standing... and the hand-plate-fork-glass coordination turns out to be trickier than expected.πŸ˜₯

    Knowing nothing of the local wedding culture, I was expecting an endless dinner followed by dances, public relations, etc. in line with our southern Europe standards. Well, I couldn't be more wrong!
    As everybody is serving themselves and eats standing, the dining part is over in less than an hour. And nothing else has been planned for this evening. Indeed, tomorrow morning the real ceremony will take place and the programme starts at... 6.30am!!!
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  • Day10

    Breakfast Reception

    February 24 in India β‹… β˜€οΈ 20 Β°C

    When the alarm clock rings at 6am we deeply regret not going straight to bed after dinner yesterday night: we started the post-reception evening with the problem of not knowing how to kill time and ended up going to bed at 2am...
    Today's programme is quite vague and since none of us has ever attended an Indian wedding before, we are totally unprepared in what to expect. According to the programme, breakfast will be served at the wedding venue between 6.30 and 8am, while lunch will start at 11.30am. Sometime between (or during?πŸ™„) there should be a long religious marriage ceremony meant to be a mix of the traditions of the two birth regions of the spouses (no, they don't come from the same place... and no, they don't even speak the same language... but yes, they are both Hinduist).

    Realistically, we aim to be at the wedding house no earlier than 7.30/8am and I assume the rest of the European group will do the same. While I am getting ready, Ludo brings our bags (which doubled in number since our arrival one week ago) to the wedding venue and then comes back for me. In the hotel there is nobody able to help me wearing the saree (or, more likely, they didn't understand a word of our request) so I just put it on randomly and go to the White Houzz where Vaidehi will help me fixing it.
    We were right: most of the attendees have either just shown up or still have to arrive: only a couple of very diligent Germans was at the wedding venue already at 6.30am. So we have plenty of time for our breakfast.. also because apparently the priest is late!!! πŸ˜…

    If yesterday the reception dinner was quite "westernised" both in terms of dress code and dining facilities, today everything will be strictly traditional. In other words, we will have to eat with our bare hands as Indians don't use cutlery! Having that in mind, as a precaution, I steal from the breakfast buffet two plastic teaspoons (allowed for this meal as there is the traditional veggie curry soup I learnt to love over the past days) and hide them in my clutch. They will be probably very valuable at lunch time...πŸ€”

    Vaidehi asked me to meet in a changing room to drap my saree, but didn't specify where it is located. I start exploring the hall looking for potential changing rooms and I end up in a messy stock room, followed by a creepy toilet... and then, finally, a big changing room. The problem is that it was not empty... There were the Hindu priests and the groom in his underwear 😣😣😣 I literally run out hoping not to have been recognise and I finally stumble upon Vaidehi, who finally fixes my saree.
    Read more

You might also know this place by the following names:

Bommanahalli, Hosur Road

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