Italy
Ravello

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21 travelers at this place

  • Day10

    Museo della carta

    July 29, 2019 in Italy ⋅ ⛅ 24 °C

    We walked to Marmorata today, a lovely walk through the lemon groves. We then took a bus to Amalfi and walked to the Paper Museum - the first site where paper was introduced in Europe, made from cotton in the 13th century. Amelie and Joseph loved the tour of the paper mill and got to see some paper being made. Great day.Read more

  • Day9

    Pizza Picnic

    July 28, 2019 in Italy ⋅ 🌧 24 °C

    A few hikes up the hills into Ravello, (v.expensive) gelato🍦, lots of tears from a very sleepy Joseph and a stormy evening outside. After a long siesta, we settled for a pizza picnic in our room for tea. We found Nino's pizza where marinara is only 2.5 euros. 😀 Right out of our window we can see the terrace of the apartment we spent a month in, on our world travels, 9 years ago. Such happy times and so blessed to have our two wonderful children with us to share it all with now. They really have amazed us. Poor Joey and his little legs on the steps - going to try and give him a bit of a rest on the bus tomorrow🚌.Read more

  • Day12

    Grand Hotel Europa

    July 31, 2019 in Italy ⋅ ⛅ 24 °C

    The name of the hotel is slightly misleading, not so grand, but good to end our trip, back at the beginning, in Naples. Hike, paddle, boat, train and the end of our trip. We have had the happiest time celebrating the happiest ten years 😀Read more

  • Day6

    Ravello

    May 12, 2015 in Italy ⋅ 24 °C

    Yesterday, we moved on alone for the second section of our trip. We travelled by car from Frascati to Ravello on the Amalfi Coast. It is a 3 hour drive, mainly on the A1 which is the motorway running from Milano down to the Sicily ferry. The scenery gradually changes, becoming flatter, as one moves further south. We passed Monte Casino, immediately recognisable perched on its craggy hilltop. Basking gently in the sun, one could only imagine the vicious battle that raged here some 70 years ago. Just past this point we turned off the motorway and tracked through the outskirts of Napoli, which is as manic as you would think. Mountains reared up ahead of us and it gradually dawned that we would have to climb up and over them to reach our destination. Our young driver, with typical Italian flair, handled it all with impressive sang froid, meeting large vehicles and reversing back down steep gradients where necessary. As we climbed, the views became ever more stunning. We stopped at the top of the pass to look out over Napoli, the sea and of course Mt Vesuvius. It was quite a sight laid out at our feet. Continuing on our way we now descended the other side . Views of the Mediterranean came into view and we gradually approached our destination, Ravello, a small town perched high above the Azure blue sea. We are staying at the Palazzo Avino which is as gorgeous as we had hoped, with more spectacular views from every part of the hotel out over the mountainous coastline and the sea. It is undoubtedly the spot to relax after a busy week and we have spent today exploring Ravello on foot. It has an atmosphere all of its own and is pretty special to be honest. There is a Duomo of course, with a pair of carved marble Urns from the 2nd century AD. Peter remarked that he didn't think he had ever touched anything that old and yes, incredibly you could do just that! There was a pulpit and Amphora from the C7th, with clear Byzantine influences. It is a simple but very beautiful cathedral rather like the little village itself.Read more

  • Day8

    Pompeii

    May 14, 2015 in Italy ⋅ ⛅ 18 °C

    Today has been all about once more taking a step backwards into Ancient Roman Culture. Having previously visited Hadrian's Imperial Villa at Tivoili, we did have an idea what to expect and of course Pompeii is well known the world over, as the city that perished in the Vesuvius eruption of AD 79, but the sheer scale of it is overwhelming. We did not manage to visit it all or Herculaneum, it's smaller cousin similarly destroyed the other side of the volcano. One of us did feel that wandering about more ruins in the heat, this time with the world and his wife for company could only be stomached in two hour bursts!! For those of you who have not been able to visit, it is absolutely fascinating. The work that has been accomplished over the years is tremendous, but it is still a gigantic archaeological excavation to be honest. Pompeii and the majority of its occupants were buried over a two day period in a 6 mtr layer of red hot ash, pumice and cinder, spewed out by the volcano in a series of enormous eruptions, beginning first thing one morning, accompanied by earthquakes and lightening. The poor inhabitants must have justifiably thought the end of the world was nigh and most, understandably, attempted to take shelter in their homes, not realising that what they really needed to do was flee whilst they had the chance. The sky turned black and the terrified inhabitants huddled in their houses waiting for the eruption to pass and hoping to survive the debris field raining down on them. What we of course know today, is that there was worse to come. The enormous mushroom cloud that rose some 20,000 ft into the sky eventually fell back to earth and scorched down the sides of Vesuvius at speeds of 65mph. Known as a pyroclastic flow, it incinerated everything in its path, both animal and human. It was this that destroyed Herculaneum, which up to now had avoided the majority of the searingly hot debris and it was then buried by a thick layer of scalding mud. Anyone who had survived in either town so far, stood not a chance. The site was abandoned for many years following the disaster and it was not until Hadrian's reign that an attempt was begun to recover the position. Clearly, archaeologists have discovered a vast amount about the lives of Roman citizens from Pompeii, as here, unlike other places, life stopped dead on that fateful morning, with the detritus of everyday life in place. What does seem haunting is that Pompeii's remains are surrounded by modern day Napoili. The juxtaposition between the fate of these ancient Romans and the Napolese going about their everyday business is poignant to say the least.
    We returned to Palazzo Avino for a late lunch pleased to have had the chance to experience Pompeii firsthand, but somewhat chastened. Whilst I thoroughly enjoyed my pear, Gorgonzola, rocket and walnut salad, with honey dressing, it was in my mind that all those centuries ago the townspeople of Pompeii did not get beyond breakfast.
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  • Day12

    Finale

    May 18, 2015 in Italy ⋅ 🌙 20 °C

    Why is it that holidays pass at the speed of light ? Something to do with the enjoyment factor I suspect, but all too quickly we woke up on our final day and the journey home had to be contemplated.
    We decided to treat ourselves for our final evening by dining at Rossellini's, the Michelin starred restaurant at Palazzo Avino. It was to be our personal Ruby Wedding Dinner for the two of us and it was certainly special. There are two options here, you can dine inside or outside on the terrace. As it was a lovely evening we chose the latter and the view to die for, plus the sunset. I'm not sure which was the more memorable the setting or the food. I guess the chef would require me to say the food and I could not deny him that honour, because he and his staff certainly deserved the accolade.
    Ravello and Palazzo Avino are places that are certain to hold in life's memory bank and I thank the hand of fate that pushed us in their direction. We spent the final day visiting the gardens of Villa Rufolo, (which whilst good were not a patch on Villa Cimbrione), indulging in a little light shopping and having lunch at our favourite garden cafe. Before we could blink, it was time to depart for Napoli airport and the homeward journey. Dinner on this occasion consisted of a packet of breadsticks that happened to be abandoned on the floor of the car - unopened I hasten to add. How the mighty are fallen, but then we could scarcely complain, following the 10 days it had been our privilege to experience. Until the next time!
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  • Day7

    Villa Cimbrione

    May 13, 2015 in Italy ⋅ 🌙 17 °C

    Today we wandered along through Ravello's narrow streets, stopping regularly to gaze at the spectacular views eventually reaching the Villa Cimbrione. This is an old estate perched on the cliff top that was rescued from dereliction in the early 1900s by Lord Grimthorpe from Yorkshire. He came to this part of Italy in an attempt to recover from a serious depression following the early death of his wife, and fell in love with Ravello. As a consequence he purchased and restored Villa Cimbrione, creating a fabulous garden, heavily influenced by English designers such as Peto, Lutyens and Jekyll. Lord Grimthorpe was involved with the Bloomsbury Group, many of whom came here to stay and Vita Sackville-West organised much of the planting. It is a glorious garden, with amazing sea views throughout. I am sure it would be only too easy to recover from anything here. Lord Grimthorpe loved it so much, he left instructions that his ashes be interred at the base of a small temple overlooking the sea and Amalfi. I can think of worse places to rest in peace!Read more

  • Day21

    Daytrip to Amalfi and Positano

    September 24, 2019 in Italy ⋅ ⛅ 22 °C

    Despite seeing many photos the real thing still makes a big impression.
    Highlights were the view from VillaCimbone in Ravello, Amalfi cathedral and the overall beauty if the sheer cliffs with vineyards, lemon and pommegranite.
    Lovely seafood pasta in a jar at Mama Rosa back in Salerno.
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  • Day26

    Scala, Ravello

    May 9, 2016 in Italy ⋅ ☀️ 19 °C

    On the way home, we stopped by at a town called Ravello, across the ridge from Scala, which is where we stayed. We have seen Ravello from Scala and it looked like it was worth a visit.

    This town boasts a number of 5-star hotels. Not surprising considering the commanding view each hotel gets from their location. Restaurants here seem to tip-toe precariously on cliffs for a view that’s second to none. How did they build in such precarious locations? This seems pretty consistent with the way they drive - they laugh at death in the face.

    Ravello also has a network of little alleyways with shops – always a favourite with Flora. It’s a pity we discovered this town so late in our Amalfi trip. The shops were starting to close, we take a few more happy snaps before we head back to our accommodation. Tomorrow will be an early start as we're heading up to watch Stage 5 of Giro d'Italia (Italy's version of Tour de France).
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Ravello

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