Myanmar
Ngapegyaung

Discover travel destinations of travelers writing a travel journal on FindPenguins.
Add to bucket listRemove from bucket list
Travelers at this place
    • Day23

      Inle Lake: Kayah Women with long necks.

      March 12, 2020 in Myanmar ⋅ ⛅ 88 °F

      Kayah women are the famous Padaung, or "long-necks" with their women wearing customary brass rings since the age of nine. Although a dying tradition, Padaung continue to wear the rings and we were welcomed to meet a few of the women whose craft is weaving. They are lovely and very friendly. They believe their mothers are dragons hence the long neck and head ware symbolizing a dragon woman. Men do not wear the neck bracelets.Read more

      Traveler

      Hard to believe they still do this...

      3/13/20Reply
      Traveler

      Less now than in the past. A grown women’s neck rings weigh 10 Kilos. I was shocked when I held one.

      3/13/20Reply
      Traveler

      Sad really.

      3/13/20Reply
      3 more comments
       
    • Day14

      Floating Gardens, Nga-Phe-Kyaung Kloster

      November 28, 2019 in Myanmar ⋅ 🌙 12 °C

      Auf unserem Weg den Fluss entlang in Richtung Inle See, kamen wir erneut an den Schwimmenden Gärten vorbei und machten einen kurzen Stopp in einem alten Kloster. Es wurde 1850 gebaut und ist eines der ältesten Kloster hier. Der damalige Mönch dressierte Katzen durch einen kleinen Ring zu springen, wodurch das Kloster sehr berühmt wurde. Noch heute leben viele Katzen hier und scheinen sich sehr wohl zu fühlen, nur durch Reifen springen sie mittlerweile nicht mehr.

      Und mit diesem Besuch haben wir auch schon das Ende unseres heutigen Ausfluges erreicht. Wir werden wieder zu unserem Hotel gebracht, verabschieden uns mit einem Abschiedsfoto von Imun und danken ihr nochmal dass sie alles so tapfer mit uns durchgestanden hat.
      Wir gehen ein frühes Abendbrot verspeisen und kaufen noch ein paar Snacks und Wasser ein und verkrümeln uns endlich auf unser Zimmer, um Ruhe nachzuholen und endlich mal ein paar Bilder hochzuladen.

      Morgen haben wir dann einen Tag ganz zum Gammeln und Entspannen. Wir wollen hier noch einen Markt besuchen, holen unsere Wäsche von Laundry Service auf der anderen Straßenseite ab und mehr soll es eigentlich auch nicht werden...die letzten Tage hatten es in sich und wir wollen einfach mal die Ruhe genießen. Wir haben ja schließlich Urlaub, nech? :)
      Read more

      Petra A.

      Gut das euch doch noch einfällt dass ihr Urlaub habt, ich dachte schon ihr ackert durch bis zur Abreise🙃

      11/28/19Reply
      Traveler

      Nein nein...ab morgen steht Strandurlaub auf dem Plan, da können wir nochmal ordentlich entspannen 😊

      11/29/19Reply
       
    • Day23

      Floating Farms

      March 12, 2020 in Myanmar ⋅ ⛅ 82 °F

      Sustainable farming ... long before our English word was invented. This was mind blowing.

      Silt from the mountains run into the streams during the rainy season (autumn) and into the lake. Some of it clumps together with grass to form floating islands of green on the lake. The farmers gather this and organize it into 1 meter wide, long rows, with a small canal between each row. The islands are staked in place with bamboo shoots. The farmers tend to the rows by paddling small boats in the separating canals. The floating islands are thick enough that they will support a man standing on them as well.

      One of the pics shows the farmers cutting the grass as part of the preparation for planting the crops. They grow tomatoes, garlic, and other crops. The man in the foreground, cutting grass, found the bowl of a old opium pipe. He came over and gave it to us as a gift! We asked if we could give something in return and we’re told he would be insulted if we did. Such are these amazingly friendly people.

      Once we went further we came to the village where the farmers and their families lived. It has a high school, medical facility, and stores. Like all other villages here, all residents do the same thing. So everyone was a farmer here. Other villages were all silver smiths, while other villages made rice cakes , others were weavers. Astounding! Simple, resourceful, community oriented, no one better than anyone else, yet seemingly happy and content. I think they could teach us something.
      Read more

      Cathy Berry I have read about this, fascinating to see the pictures this close.

      3/14/20Reply
      Traveler

      It is mind boggling. They have been farming via hydroponic m, sustainable, organic, regenerative and other new age techniques that we think are so new age for centuries. Wish you were here with us. I can’t get enough of Myanmar countryside.

      3/14/20Reply
       
    • Day23

      Inle Lake: Silversmith Workshop

      March 12, 2020 in Myanmar ⋅ ⛅ 90 °F

      We visited a traditional silversmith floating craft village houses. All built above the Inle Lake, each with its own skills set and expertise. They are happy to demonstrate their silversmithing craft and do not expect you to purchase anything since they sell at markets and customers overseas. It is gorgeous if you like silver but pricy.

      The first picture shows the craftsman melting the ore which contains aluminum, manganese, copper, and silver. This was the last step, extracting the silver. The ingot in the closeup, in Bob’s hand he created as we watched. It was 98% pure silver, 3% copper.
      Read more

      Traveler

      Interesting!

      3/17/20Reply
      Traveler

      Pretty!!

      3/17/20Reply
       
    • Day23

      Inle Lake: Farmers Market (Continued)

      March 12, 2020 in Myanmar ⋅ ⛅ 84 °F

      This market happens every 5 days. It’s THE place for the locals in the surrounding villages to buy, sell, barter their goods. Some villages are in the nearby mountains, others are the fisherman or floating island farmers near Lake Inle, still others are from silver making villages or weaving villages, etc. It was fascinating to learn that everyone in the respective village does the same thing! Some villagers travel far, so they come the night before to set up their stall and/or to shop.Read more

    • Day23

      Inle Lake: Thursday Farmers Market

      March 12, 2020 in Myanmar ⋅ ⛅ 84 °F

      The Farmers Market occurs every 5 days at this location. It serves as an economic hubs of Inle Lake where the farmers from the mountains and floating islands meet the fisherfolk of the water to trade their wares and use the profits to buy the other essentials of life on offer at the stalls.
      Without Mala, our guide, leading the we would have gotten lost in the labyrinth of local produce and wares. We loved the experience of being surrounded by the Myanmar very loving people, squatting down and negotiating their sales. We were told that everyone gets off work to go and shop on Thursday at the Farmers Market.
      Read more

    • Day23

      Inke Lake: Farmers Market (Continued)

      March 12, 2020 in Myanmar ⋅ ⛅ 86 °F

      Unknown to many, there are more than 10 different Shan tribes living in total harmony in Inle Lake. They each have unique characteristics and speak their own language. At the market the vendor can be identified by the colourful headress they are wearing.

      1. Intha means Children of the Lake, and the language closely resembles of the Myanmar people. Legend says that Intha people living on Lake Inle are the direct descendants of Dawei. The Intha people are hard-working folks. The women roll cigars and weave. Intha fishmen are well-known for their one-legged rowing skill

      2. Known as the “Kaw” or “Yi-Kaw”, the Akha live in highlands about 1,000 metres above sea level. They are slash-and-burn agriculturists and have moved from place to place in search of fertile land. Their total population is approximately 200,000 in Myanmar.

      3. Khun m: The Khun and Shan-Gyi are of Thai-Shan heritage. Khun lives predominantly to the east of the Thanlwin River while Shan-Gyi lives in the west. Both the Khun and Shan-Gyi have their own writing and literature.

      4. The Lahu-Na people are good-natured and open. They are welcoming to guests from other regions, and the villagers always help one another. To top this off, Lahu-Na men are said to be very kind to their wives.

      5. The Lahu, who bear striking similarities to Native Americans, are also categorised into three subgroups. They are the Lahu-Shi, Lahu-Na and Lahu-Ni. They speak different languages and wears different traditional costumes.

      6. Lisu: A Lisu New Year celebration is celebrated for three executive days in each village. At each village, the dancers form a circle around the sacred New Years tree and do simple dance steps to accompanying of three-stringed banjo music.

      7. Shan-Gyi means Bigger Shan. They live in the valleys of the Shan Plateau and are rice farmers by tradition. The Shan-Gyi, along with the Khun and Thai-Lu, are a subgroup of the Shan people in Myanmar.

      8. The Eng are related to the Wa tribe and is also known as the Va people. They live in the foothills of the Kyaing Tong basin. Marrying young at the age of 14-15, the women spot colourful ornaments and black garb. The Eng is fearful of the water spirits and therefore build their villages away from swamplands and rivers.

      9. Akhu: A super small subgroup of the Akha people, the Akhu people live in four villages in the Kyaing Tong region. Interestingly, the entire community of Wan-Jai Village attends a Baptist church service on Sunday night.

      10. Thai-Lu: A subgroup of the Shan people, the Thai-Lu can trace its roots to the Sip-song-pan-na of Yunnan China. They are dispersed all over the Shan State in Myanmar. At Wan-Paw Village, the Thai-Lu people happily harvest their crops.
      Read more

    • Day15

      Tag 15 Inle See #Nga-Phe-Kyaung Kloster

      October 14, 2019 in Myanmar ⋅ ⛅ 25 °C

      Auch das größte und älteste Kloster der Region durfte natürlich auf unseren Trip nicht fehlen. Also hieß es weiter geht es😁. Und da war es auch schon. Sehr unscheinbar von außen. Doch auch hier kommt der Buddhistische Glanz im Innern zum Vorschein ✌😎🤗.Read more

    • Day23

      Inle Lake: Hpaung Daw U Pagoda

      March 12, 2020 in Myanmar ⋅ ⛅ 88 °F

      The pagoda houses five small gilded images of Buddha, which have been covered in gold leaf to the point that their original forms cannot be seen. The gold-leaf application to such excess is relatively recent. Old photographs hanging on the monastery walls show some of the images in original form. It is reported that some gold has been removed on occasion to reduce its mass. Only men are permitted to place gold leaf on the images. Another part of the ritual for pilgrims is to place a small robe around the images, and to take the robe back to their houses and place it on their own altar as a token of respect for the Buddha and his teachings.

      The highlight is an 18-day pagoda festival held, during which four of the Buddha images are placed on a replica of a royal barge designed as a hintha bird and taken throughout Inlay Lake. One image always left at the temple. The elaborately decorated barge is towed by several boats of leg-rowers rowing in unison, and other accompanying boats, making an impressive procession on the water. The barge is towed from village to village along the shores of the lake in clockwise fashion, and the four images are left at the main monastery in each village for the night.

      The high point of the festival is on the day when the images arrive at the main town of Nyaung Shwe, where most pilgrims from the surrounding region come to pay their respects, the Saopha of Yawnghwe would personally welcome the images. The images would be taken from the barge and a grand procession would take them to the palace or haw of the Saopha, entering the prayer hall from the eastern entrance, and where it would reside for a few hours. The public was allowed inside the prayer hall of the haw to pay their respects.

      Sometime in the 1960s during a windy day, when the waves were high on the lake, the barge carrying the images capsized, and the images tumbled into the lake. They only recovered four images. but when they went back to the monastery, the missing image was miraculously sitting in its place.
      Read more

    • Day13

      Der Inle See

      November 27, 2019 in Myanmar ⋅ ☀️ 27 °C

      Und hier noch ein paar interessante Fakten zum Inle See:
      Er ist tatsächlich ziemlich groß, aber dafür alles andere als tief. Dort, wo sich die kleinen Fischerdörfer auf den Stelzenhäusern angesiedelt haben, beträgt die Wassertiefe nur etwa 1,5m. In der Mitte des Sees dann ungefähr 3-4m und zur Regenzeit 4-5m. Daher schmunzeln wir ein wenig über die Schwimmwesten, die einsatzbereit über unseren Stühlchen baumeln. Das Anziehen beruht dann wieder auf Freiwilligkeit. Der See ist über und über mit auf Holzstelzen gebauten Hütten und Hotels besiedelt, sie halten dort sogar ihre Hausschweine, pflanzen Tomaten an und an jeder Hütte gibt es einen kleinenn Steg, an dem ein Boot anlegen kann...anders kommt man von hier ja eh nicht wieder weg. Zu unserem dezenten Ekel mussten wir feststellen, dass auch deren Plumpsklos direkt über dem Wasser schweben und wir schwören uns hoch und heilig kein einziges Fischgericht aus dieser Gegend zu bestellen. Imun erzählte uns, dass der See sehr verdreckt sei und man deswegen auch niemanden hier drin baden sehen wird....besser ist das auch.
      Unsere Fahrt zum Anleger, von wo aus wir dann zum Hotel kommen, dauert dann insgesamt nochmal 1h. Zum Hotel laufen wir dann nochmal 10min und schon auf dem Weg dorthin stellen wir fest, dass diese Gegend hier sehr auf Tourismus eingestellt ist. Überall Hotels und jede Menge kleiner Restaurants und kleine Läden, in denen man Snacks und Wasser kaufen kann.
      Read more

      Petra A.

      Naja, baden war dann ja mal nicht😖

      11/28/19Reply
       

    You might also know this place by the following names:

    Ngapegyaung

    Join us:

    FindPenguins for iOSFindPenguins for Android