Myanmar
Popaywa

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17 travelers at this place

  • Day21

    Bagan: Mt Popa

    March 10, 2020 in Myanmar ⋅ ☀️ 84 °F

    Mount Popa is a volcano of 1500 metre high. The famous monastery is actually located at a smaller hill just beside Mount Popa. This smaller hill is called Taung Kalat. However, people usually refer it as Mount Popa Monastery.

    We made our way to the summit through the 800 steep stairways. It was tiring but a truly rewarding climb. At the top we were treated to beautiful aerial views. From the monastery, we can see the great Mount Popa. Along the way there are landings with spirit Nat shrines. We were a novelty to many of the children who rarely see white people. They asked us if they can take pictures with us and some wanted to touch my hair. The children are loving and kind.
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  • Day21

    Bagan: Mt Popa (Contiued)

    March 10, 2020 in Myanmar ⋅ ☀️ 84 °F

    On our 800 step climb to The Summit of Mt Popa we enjoyed the Macaque monkeys who roam wild and are friendly. They are territorial and get into scuffles with other monkey entering their territory or if they bother their babies. Fascinating to be with them in their habitat.Read more

  • Day21

    Bagan Village on the Route to Mt Popa

    March 10, 2020 in Myanmar ⋅ ☀️ 84 °F

    A Village on the Route from Bagan to Mount Popa – A visit to tranquil and peaceful village where we met friendly local people.

  • Day21

    Bagan: Popa Mountain Resort

    March 10, 2020 in Myanmar ⋅ ☀️ 90 °F

    Our guide took us to an incredible Burmese feast with a breathtaking view of Mt Popa.

  • Day5

    Popa

    May 25, 2018 in Myanmar ⋅ ⛅ 18 °C

    We managed a bit more of a leisurely start this morning, only 0730, and had time for a bit of breakfast before we were collected by our car to take us on the roughly 50km drive to Popa.
    For those who have never heard of Popa, and I hadn’t before we started looking at coming here, it is a monastery in the mountains that sits at the top of a volcanic plug, it has pretty much vertical sides all the way round and there is a staircase that winds round the outside to get to the top. A small village has grown up around the base of it, no doubt initially to look after the needs of the monks but now probably as much for the tourists as the monks. Visually it is quite spectacular. It’s also a welcome few degrees cooler than Bagan.
    There are a couple of different entrances you can use to start your ascent, our driver directed us towards one that was flanked by a couple of painted stone elephants but was still less obvious than the main one, which most people use and where the majority of the lower down monkeys hang out. There are quite a lot of monkeys and they are quite bold, running up to people and grabbing stuff, one tried to grab my bottle of water but soon realised that was a mistake. Now with there being quite a lot of monkeys there is quite a lot of monkey poo, much of which seemed to be on the steps and the flat bits between the steps. But there are guys whose job it is to clean up so apart from the smell it wasn’t too bad. That is until after just a short way when it was time for the socks and shoes to come off and go in a locker (to prevent the monkeys stealing them) and for us to continue in bare feet. If I were to say that Tanya was not happy at having to walk in / around the monkey poo that would be an understatement, but we pushed on.
    Now about those steps, I was sure that I’d read one of the quotes that there were about 260, give or take a few, depending on which route you took and I had told Tanya as much. Well it was quickly apparent to me that there were quite a few more than that, 812 to be precise - I counted them on the way down. I don’t think Tanya would have made the ascent if she’d known that, I think I would have been dispatched to take photos and she would have retired to the nearest coffee shop or bar. But I didn’t tell her and she made it, I think she was quite glad she did.
    Needless to say we didn’t race to the top and every time we stopped we seemed to get approached by local people asking us to have a photo taken with them. It’s happened at other locations while we’ve been in Myanmar, we don’t mind but it does seem a bit strange that you might end up posing for someone else’s holiday photos. It’s mainly ladies that have asked us so I did suggest to Tanya that perhaps it was my photo they really wanted but they asked her as well because they didn’t want her to feel left out, I can’t put what she said in reply as persons under the age of 18 might be reading but I could perhaps summarise it as, “don’t be silly!!!”.
    The view from the top was well worth the climb and the descent was a whole lot easier than the ascent, then it was back in the car for the journey back to the hotel. We got back around 1230 giving Tanya plenty of time to scrub the monkey poo off of her feet and have a couple of beers before we went for a bit of late lunch.
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  • Day5

    Mount Popa

    January 1, 2020 in Myanmar ⋅ ☁️ 21 °C

    Gleich einem birmanischen Olymp gilt der Mount Popa als spiritueller Sitz der berüchtigten 37 myanmarischen nat und ist somit der beliebteste Ort für die Anbetung dieser Schutzgeister. Mount Popa lautet inzwischen der offizielle Name des berühmten Popa Taung Kalat, eines 737 m hohen, turmartigen vulkanischen Kegels unten an der Südflanke des „Mutterbergs“. Er ist gekrönt mit einem vergoldeten buddhistischen Tempel, zu dem 777 Stufen hinaufführen. Früher war der erloschene Vulkan (1518 m) als Mount Popa bekannt, doch jetzt heißt er Taung Ma-gyi (Mutterberg), um ihn vom berühmteren Popa Taung Kalat zu unterscheiden. Der von den üppigen Wäldern des Schutzgebiets Popa Mountain Park bedeckte Vulkan ist zuletzt vor rund 250 000 Jahren ausgebrochen. Hier liegt auch das exklusive Popa Mountain Resort. Auf dem Tempel bietet sich eine grandiose Aussicht über die Myingyan-Ebene und darüber hinaus. Allerdings unternehmen nur wenige Bagan-Touristen den halbtägigen Ausflug hierher.Read more

  • Day5

    Mount Popa und seine Affen

    January 1, 2020 in Myanmar ⋅ ☁️ 22 °C

    Die Stufen hinauf zum Tempel werden jeweils von Freiwilligen gereinigt. Für die Reinigung darf man ihnen ein kleines Geschenk 💰machen. Es soll auch zum eigenen Seelenwohl beitragen.
    Die Reinigung ist den unzähligen Affen geschuldet. Sie verrichten ihre Notdurft ungesehen von ihrem Aufenthaltsort.Read more

  • Day11

    Mount Popa

    September 20, 2019 in Myanmar ⋅ 🌧 26 °C

    Enroute the shared taxi stopped at a random tree house so we could see a cow grinding peanut oil and home distilled palm sugar alcohol bubbling over open fires; it did have a good view point. Unfortunately, there was also a weird procession of lone beggars who camp out on the road every 20m as you near the temple. The mountain is famous for its 777 steps, the monkeys and the cleaners asking for donations to clear up after them. The views at the top are amazing, you can see for miles and get a full 360 view as you walk around the underwhelming pagodas and temples, not counting the interesting Nat temples.Read more

  • Day4

    Mount Popa

    October 27, 2013 in Myanmar ⋅ ☀️ 0 °C

    Im strömenden Regen fahren wir zum Mount Popa, dem heiligen Berg der Nats. Der Mount Popa ist aber auch Heimat für unzählige verwöhnte und freche Tempelaffen, denen allerdings heute auch zu nass ist.

    Nats sind meist auf nicht ganz natürliche Art und Weise aus dem Leben geschiedene Personen, die als Schutzgeister weiterexistieren. Neben den 37 offiziellen Nats, die am Fuß des Mount Popa in einem Schrein versammelt sind, gibt es noch unzählige andere, denen keine bildliche Darstellung zugeordnet ist. Hier gibt es z.B. den Schutzgeist der Seeleute, den fürs Examen, und sogar die Alkoholiker haben ihren eigenen Nat...

    Bei schönem Wetter ist der Aufstieg zum Mount Popa sicherlich lohnenswert, nicht nur wegen des Tempels auf der Spitze, auch die Aussicht soll wunderschön sein. Bei diesem Wetter allerdings verzichten wir lieber auf die Wanderung und warten unten darauf, dass hin und wieder mal die Wolkendecke aufbricht und einen Blick auf die Spitze freigibt.
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You might also know this place by the following names:

Popaywa

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