Netherlands
Hofplein

Here you’ll find travel reports about Hofplein. Discover travel destinations in the Netherlands of travelers writing a travel blog on FindPenguins.

21 travelers at this place:

  • Day66

    Day 66 - Brakel to Rotterdam, 37 miles

    June 20, 2016 in the Netherlands

    So the good weather was short lived as today was pretty much non stop rain. After starting in drizzle to soon changed to heavy rain and was just a case of getting to Rotterdam. I could have taken a more scenic route but the shortest possible was option for the day with a large section alongside a motorway into Rotterdam being most direct.

    My hostel (King Kong Hostel) located on the very cool Witte de Withstraat street in Rotterdam was a very welcome site and a beer and coffee was quickly ordered. Really nice area where the locals drink and had a real East London feel. Good evening and less said about the England game the better!Read more

  • Day6

    Rotterdam

    February 23, 2017 in the Netherlands

    In Rotterdam sagen wir dann über Nacht - und den folgenden Tag auch noch. Schön, dass man hier vom Schiff sehr schnell in die Stadt kommt.
    Den Hinweg haben wir noch den Shuttlebus genutzt, kamen aber schnell zu der Einsicht, dass wir zurück auch laufen können. Nachdem wir die tolle große Markthalle und die Innenstadt gesehen haben machten wir uns zu Fuß zurück über die wohl größte und schönste Brücke der Stadt - nur leider ohne unsere Rechnung mit Petrus zu machen, denn es stürmte wie verrückt...

    Am Abend war das Hellau auf dem Programm - Karneval auf der AIDA Prima und Miri gewann quasi den Preis für das schönste Kostüm... und landete wieder im TV
    Read more

  • Day15

    Zierikzee

    September 16 in the Netherlands

    Zierikzee war seit dem frühen Mittelalter eine reiche Handelsstadt. Ihr Wohlstand führte zum Bau eines wunderschönen Hafens, eines Rathauses, Mühlen, einer Kirche sowie Stadtmauern und –toren. Heutzutage zieht Zierikzee viele Tagesbesucher an, die an der glorreichen Vergangenheit und den weit über 500 historischen Bauwerken interessiert sind.

  • Day12

    Rotterdam

    January 5, 2017 in the Netherlands

    We arrived in Rotterdam last night and were immediately welcomed by my Mum’s cousin (P) and her family, including my great aunt and great uncle. This is the Indonesian side of my family and I am at once struck by the strength of the Indonesian culture of hospitality and good cooking. We visit Tante (Aunty) E for dinner and she has cooked up a serious storm. A storm that is enjoyed with lots of stories and laughter. It’s my second time meeting Ome (Uncle) C and Tante E but I can’t recall the first time – that was about 25 years ago at a party. It’s amazing to be surrounded by family including Mum’s cousins and their families who have also come for dinner.

    By the time we wake on our final day in The Netherlands we are refreshed and ready to explore Rotterdam local style. P and her husband (M) have kindly taken time off work to show us around their city. We came to Rotterdam for a day last year but didn’t make it past the Maritime Museum and Market Hall so we are excited to see something more of this famous Dutch place.

    The first thing that strikes me is just how important shipping is to this port city. P works at the port so she is a wealth of information. But even without that it’s obvious that the people of Rotterdam are closely tied to the sea. There’s all sorts of boats here from canal barges to luxury yachts. There’s even the obligatory sinking boats filled with water rotting away. And all of this right in the heart of the city, not tucked away out of sight in some industrial or seaside area.

    Rotterdam is also obviously a city with a sense of humour. The Buttplug Gnome is actually meant to be a tribute to Santa Clause holding a festive bell. It may have caused outrage with the far right of Dutch politics but it is still standing with no indication it is going to be pulled down anytime soon. M proudly shows it to us with a Cheshire cat grin on his face waiting to capture our reactions. Only in The Netherlands …

    We continue to explore the city on foot. P and M know all the prettiest places to walk. There’s some green space along a canal with older style mansions and churches on the opposite bank. I could walk here all day and can imagine it being lovely for picnics in the summer months. Make sure you picnic on the far side of the canal though because a tram track runs on the city side. I will miss the historic architecture of Europe when I return home.

    M points out the Pauluskerk (Paul’s Church). This famous building is a place where people who are homeless or addicted to drugs can come for help. It is located almost in the heart of Rotterdam and has an architectural design that is impossible to ignore. I like the juxtaposition of this loud building with the way Western societies like to hide the reality of homelessness and drug addiction. It cannot be ignored when a place so linked with these circumstances is so clearly identifiable.

    We walk past the casino. It looks like a modest building. I am struck by the lack of fanfare here at the entrance. And also by the museum pieces in the window. I rarely gamble putting maybe $30 a year through pokie (slot) machines a year and never buying myself a lottery or scratch-it ticket. My work colleagues jokingly tell me that this is because I am Dutch and don’t like to part with my money. P and M also joke that they do not really like to gamble either. The museum pieces are interesting though. Particularly for me as an Australian where pokie (slot) machines are a dangerous hobby that ruins many lives.

    It’s late afternoon now and we are almost back at the car park. Our final stop is the famous cube house complex. We saw it on our way along the canal this morning but are now walking through the complex. For three Euros you can enter one of the houses. Inside the houses are larger than they look from the outside. And, yes, the floors are flat, not sloping. The design is almost a perfect use of every centimeter of available space. While it’s certainly in the style of tiny house living, it’s not cramped. It’s quite incredible really how we are so used to a certain design of house that our minds take a little while to adjust to the concept of these cubes. But I certainly think they would make fantastic living spaces, particularly with the convenience of being in the city centre.
    Read more

  • Day1

    Rotterdam

    April 14, 2016 in the Netherlands

    Not that you can get much of an impression in the short time I've been on board.
    But the Ovation ots does seem big bold and busy.
    I suppose that could be with the passengers being 99% British and relatively young.
    She doesn't seem to have the relaxed atmosphere of the Anthem or the Quantum, but that could just be me getting old and liking the smaller quieter ships, lol.
    Having said that she is beautiful and the panda climbing down the side of the ship to reach it's baby, is really quite cute.
    She has all the usual Quantum class amenities such as the North Star, Sky Fly, bumper cars etc.
    So as with the other ships in this class and the Oasis class, she is more suited to young families and the more adventurous amongst us.
    Read more

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Hofplein

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