Portugal
Jardim da Estrela

Here you’ll find travel reports about Jardim da Estrela. Discover travel destinations in Portugal of travelers writing a travel blog on FindPenguins.

5 travelers at this place:

  • Day6

    calcada da estrela - lisbon

    June 11 in Portugal

    Wandering up from the government building up to this Basilica Da Estrela.

    Beautiful Jacarda trees contrast with the blue building.

    I like there drainage ditches, nicely tiled.

    a hard ware store......nothing like our local canadian tires, just a small petite store.

    the basilica was next to a turnaround for the trams.

    Basil plants: this from a website. they are part of the festival as St Anthony is the matchmaker saint. and males are suppose to give these to their female partners.....

    "Starting June 12, Lisbon honors the city’s patron saint with a 3-day festival. The 12th is the feast day of St. Anthony, who is also known as the matchmaker saint.

    Lisbon’s festival begins with a feast of sardines, a tradition that dates back to 13th century Italy. When locals didn’t care to listen to St. Anthony’s sermons, he took to the sea and delivered them to the fish.

    The festival is also a time to celebrate love and marriage prospects. Single women stand small statues of St. Anthony upside down, awaiting the day that he delivers a viable husband (which is when the statue will be placed upright). Men partake by delivering basil plants to loved ones with poems attached. Throughout the city, balconies can be seen with basil–and pot plants, with affectionate messages to St. Anthony or the recipient."
    Read more

  • Day6

    Jardin de Estrella lisbon

    June 11 in Portugal

    This is the garden across the street from the Basicilla.

    We had lunch here at a vegan cafe. Cheese, Tomato toast, with a cabbage salad and mango dressing. Cheesecake for desert, it was crumbly, not overly sweet, very nice.

    Laid out in the middle of the 19th cenruy the popular gardens are a focal part of the Estrela quarter. the formal gardens are lane with herbaceous borders, shrubs surrounding plan trees and elms. The central feature of the park is a green wrought iron bandstand decorated with elegant filigree where musicians strike up in the summer months. Built in 1884, and original stood on the Passeio Publico before the creation of Avenida da Liberdade.

    there is an english cemetery to the north of the gardens which we didn't go to.
    Read more

  • Day6

    Jardin De Estrala Lisbon

    June 11 in Portugal

    There were a couple of ponds, one on the terrace/patio where we had lunch. The stuatue was outside of one of the entrances to the garden. I think it Might be Vasco Da Gama.

    the hill was like Arthurs hill in Edinburgh, but obviously not as high....

  • Day6

    Jardin De Estrala Lisbon

    June 11 in Portugal

    Thats the bandstand

    a great succulent collection, the opuntia (prickly pear cactus) was in bloom, one was yellow O. indicc-ficus, and the other was pink.

    I think that is a guava flower in blossom - Acca sellowiana, Ray has had this for sale at our plant sale over the years, I remember typing it in for his invoices!! Not sure if it actually fruits in our climate in Vancouver, but it sure is beautiful.

    That is the Dragon tree - Dracaenea draco It has very spiky foliage and looks a lot like a yucca or one of the cordyline palms but the branching structure is much lower.
    great information panel at the University of Lisbon Botanical Garden - the Red Resin , Dragons blood , has been used medicinally and as a dye by many cultures over the centuries. Native to the Azores, Madeira, Canary Islands and NW Africa. Flowers at 20-30 years of age and shows "dichotomous ramification' that is the branching structure splits. so that is why such an interesting branching structure.

    the statue colin is looking at, not sure who it was, but look at that philodendron growing on the rocks behind Colin. It is huge.
    Read more

  • Day42

    Lisbon

    July 17, 2017 in Portugal

    After a slow start (catching up on various chores we neglected for sometime, including loading Annette's Europe phone with credit, something we have attempted now for nearly a week!) we walked the mysterious, terribly chaotic and equally beautiful hilly streets of Lisboa starting from our accommodation near Basilica de Estrela into Bairro Alto. While the streets are less narrow compared to Andalusian towns, they are lined with old tall buildings, covered in colourful tiles, often with fresh washing hanging from their balconies. The historic pavements are lined with tiny cubes of stone, much smaller than cobblestones, while mostly laid perfectly straight, from their usage over the centuries it makes them so smooth and slippery fast walking is not advised. Adding to the flair are the historic trams travelling back and forth attached to overhanging power lines and the single carriages are mostly packed with locals and tourists alike. There were many opportunities to stop, check out unusual little stores, see local products and generally enjoying getting lost as each street offers new adventures and sensational photo opportunities. We came home late, nearly before the supermarkets closed shortly before 9 pm & enjoyed a home made salad before falling into our bed. An added advantage to living in an apartment means we get to listen to ABC Radio National and catch up with news from home. Strange only is the fact that over dinner we listen to the morning news the next day from Australia.Read more

  • Day41

    Lisbon

    July 16, 2017 in Portugal

    After a strange and fairly sleepless night at Vila Nova de Milfontes, we awoke to a misty morning...checked out of our accommodation and went to find coffee and make some breakfast at a spot overlooking the river and beaches. Our sleep was disturbed last night by barking dogs and inconsiderate fellow house guests (Spanish). At about 4am in the morning the latter seemed to think nothing of smoking, drinking, talking, going to the bathroom repeatedly and re-arranging furniture almost endlessly - doing a lot of this on the common balcony next to our open door. Even our hosts (Fernanda and Luis) commented upon it all as we left. Further drama in making our last minute booking for Lisbon accomodation - after making a booking for one apartment on booking.com (and having deliberated extensively over its choosing) the accomodation said that it was not available and that they would give us another apartment elsewhere; no apology, no information about the new accomodation. So we tried to cancel and re-book as we drove. We eventually arrived in Lisbon at about 2.30pm, got into the new apartment at about 4pm (the Estrela Apartment, near Basilica de Estrela), parking very nearby - at least for the moment. After settling in, we went looking (ultimately unsuccessfully) for food at Mercado de Campo de Ourique (which we found disappointing in terms of food choices for us), came home, made a meal and caught up with some news in English (our first time for a while).Read more

  • Day44

    Lisbon

    July 19, 2017 in Portugal

    We started the day with an historical walking tour (Lisbon Walker) with our guide Claudia (a German female historian who has made Lisbon her home for the last 17 years). For over 3 hours we explored the Alfama area and really learned a lot about this fascinating city from its early origins with the Phoenicians, Romans, Moors and Christians...to the earthquake of 1755 and its devastating effects on the city and its inhabitants. After stopping for lunch, we walked to Rossio Square, looking for Licor de Ginja (which we had sampled on our walking tour). This is a sweet cherry liquor that is supposedly the unofficial drink of Lisbon. We bought from a Ginjinha (a very tiny bar where no more than about 3 people can order at any one time). Its is served in liquor glasses with small cherries that have been soaked in the substance and are strongly alcoholic. On the way to Rossio Square we finally found the Santa Justa lift (inaugurated 1902) to assist in travelling between the different levels of the city. It is a somewhat remarkable looking structure (it looks a bit like an alien robot has landed!!!). This time around, given Annette's sore calves and our general lack of energy...we decided to take Tram No. 28 back home (again packed in like sardines!). Dinner was served early tonight (at 'home'), just a lentil salad with local cheap wine (of course...and it's good). Tomorrow we move on to Sintra.Read more

  • Day43

    Lisbon

    July 18, 2017 in Portugal

    We decided not to rush out the door in the morning. Instead we went to a local organic store to stock up on simple supplies. We ate left over lunch at 'home' and, with the intent to save our energies for our evening outing, we headed off riding Tram No 28 as far as we could - a little beyond São Jorge Castle. The area where the tram travels is such a twisted maze of old streets, we could only rely on our intuition about when to get off. After 30 or so minutes feeling like canned sardines (a particularly approriate comparison for Portugal which proliferates with grilled sardines and sardine imagery!) upon embarking, it felt necessary to stop off for a beer and Portuguese treats (Pastel de Nata and Bolinhos de Bacalhau - Portuguese tart and Codfish cake) to calm our nerves following the edgy tram ride. Needless to mention we immediately regretted this decision. We wandered in the direction of Baixa/Chiado where we stumbled upon a flea market, Feira de Ladra. It proved too tempting for Annette not to 'catch' some beautifully handmade ceramic sardines to remind us of this experience back home. One of our pursuits was to locate an organic bakery which lead us on a path with many other tourists and eventually turned out to be a dead end, as after endless hills back and forth we realised this business is no longer in operation. Hungry and exhausted we made our way back to our little apartment, up and down too many hills to count and in full sun. What happened to our plan to take it easy before going out again at night? Not long after arriving home it was time to hit the beautifully exhausting pavement of Lisboa again to reach 'Povo' for our evening meal and for our first 'Fado'. Fado is a music genre that can be traced to the 1820s in Lisbon, Portugal. It is folk music generally either about love or the sea. A male or female singer is accompanied by a Portuguese guitar and a classic guitar. When it is performed the lights are dimmed and silence is required. Luis Manhita was the star of the night although we thought as a singer lacked the passion we expected. The guitar players were, however, marvellous. We were informed that the version performed was a more light hearted contemporary version. Nonetheless we had a wonderful first Fado experience. If we were not gluttons for punishment enough, we decided to walk home again. By now Annette's calves felt as if she had been riding in the Tour de France...Unless you have walked those Lisboa hills up and down yourself, you probably think we are just whinging...Read more

You might also know this place by the following names:

Jardim da Estrela

Join us:

FindPenguins for iOS FindPenguins for Android

Sign up now