Russia
Ivolginskiy Rayon

Here you’ll find travel reports about Ivolginskiy Rayon. Discover travel destinations in Russia of travelers writing a travel blog on FindPenguins.

16 travelers at this place:

  • Day84

    Ulan-Ude

    August 27 in Russia

    It is our last city in Russia and it is not a really nice one. It is very dirty and we found nothing special here. Tomorrow we will visit a temple maybe this is more interesting than the city.

    Die letzte russische Stadt die wir besuchen ist tatsächlich auch die hässlichste. Ulan-Ude (neuer Name Ulan-Öde :D) ist eine sehr schmutzige Stadt und ohne viele Highlights. Dennoch gibt es natürlich ein zwei nette Ecken, aber mehr leider nicht. Morgen gehen wir nochmal zu einem Tempel, mal schauen wie es uns dort gefällt.Read more

  • Day85

    The Datsan Rinpoche Bagsha Temple is located on a hill about 3km away from the city center of Ulan-Ude. Especially the view to the city from the hill was very nice.

    Der Datsan Rinpoche Bagsha Tempel ist ca. 3km vom Bahnhof Ulan-Udes entfernt und liegt auf einem kleinen Hügel über der Stadt. Der Tempel an sich ist ganz nett auch wenn wir schon schönere gesehen haben aber für den Blick über die Stadt hat sich der Weg gelohnt.Read more

  • Day21

    Privet Ulan-Ude!

    April 21 in Russia

    My last stop in Russia has probably been one of the best. Let's catch you up withy my stay in Ulan-Ude.

    Train 5 - Irkutsk to Ulan-Ude

    As this train journey was only seven hours and was during the day I decided to choose a seat instead of a bed. My carriage was only about a third full so was a very quiet journey. I read most of the way, although stopping to take in the amazing view of the lake which we travelled alongside for about an hour. I still can't quite get over its size. I arrived in Ulan-Ude at about 10pm and walked the short distance to my hostel. I was quite hungry when i got there and the girl working at the hostel told me there was a shop nearby that would be open. On the way there though i noticed a Subway out of the corner of my eye. I caved. I chose the easy option. Don't judge me...

    Day 1 - Ivolginsky Datsan

    I decided to take the local bus out of the city to the village of Ivolgiansky to visit the datsan (Buddhist monestary) which is the oldest Buddhist monestary in Russia. The journey was very straightforward and I arrived after 40 minutes. As it is a Buddhist temple there are a few rules which should be followed when inside the complex. When you enter the complex (which is a series of temples and buildings within a walled area) you have to walk around the tiled path in a clockwise direction, in a proud manner (being in thought or prayer), and you must spin the Mantra scrolls that you pass them, which is supposed to symbolise the mantras being read and the enegry being released. Only after have you completed this circuit can you enter the temples themself. After the first circuit I walked around again and then went into each other temples as I walked by. As you enter you must take off your hat as a sign of respect, and when inside you must also walk around the room in a clockwise direction. Each temple I went in was empty apart from a single monk who i assume is there to look after the buildings between prayers. The buildings themselves are very colourful, and insde are decorated with a number of coloured silk scarfs and flags. There is an area in the middle of each one with small seats and cussions where the monks pray. And as they are meant for prayer it is forbidden to take pictures inside. It was very peacful walking around the monestary, and as it is off season for tourists, and it was actually snowing that day the place was nearly empty. Just a few monks walking around and locals who are visiting to pray. As i was trying to enter the main central monestary a monk came over to see if I needed help. He explained that the temple was closed as the monk was probably eating. He then said that he had some free time and would i like him to show me around. He explained that each temple was build for a different lama. And the one that i was trying to enter was actually for the 12th Pandito Hambo Lama who was 166 years old and was inside meditating and has been like that for 95 years. More on that later. He gave me a small tour of the complex where he showed me a few temples, the university where the apprentice monks train, and was even kind enough to show me his house on the site. As we were walking around he explained that he studied in India in an english school and that is why he can speak the language but he has forgotten alot, so when he sees tourists here and has some free time he likes to talk to them to practice. As we were about to part ways, as the main temple was about to open again, he asked if I had facebook. So now folks I am facebook friends with a very cool Buddhist Monk. I didn't expect that when i woke up this morning! I then whent to visit the 166 year old Lama. And as no photos were alowed inside the temple I am afraid you will have to visit Ulan-Ude to see him for yourself. Words will not suffice.

    Day 2 - Ulan-Ude

    I decided to get the local bus to Datsan Rinpoche Bagsha, the temple within the city, which also provided a panoramic view of the city. When i got on the bus it was standing room only and I positioned myself in the aisle next to an older man. I glanced at him and he took that as an ivitation to start talking to me. I told him i didn't speak any Russian (in Russian), but he carried on talking to me. He had a book with him, which i later learned was of foreign literature, and he was trying to show me pages from England, in Russian. I kept smiling and nodding along and then he closed the book and handed to me and said "present". I said "are you sure?" and he kept nodding. I thanked him and took the book and then sat down in a newly empty seat. He then turned around to me and nodded and said "hmm... Beatles!...John Lennon... Paul McCartney...". I then interjected "Da... Ringo Star." He smiled excitedly and then turned away. I then heard people laughing and turned around and saw two local girls who said "he's crazy". After a few minutes he got up for his stop and said "Goodbye my friend" as he left. Well that was definitely the most interaction I've had with a local who wasn't working in a hostel. Once at the temple I followed the same rules as the previous day and walked around the complex in a clockwise direction, but this time i took a few pictures as I walked as it seemed to be a more relaxed place. As I was walking around I saw the two girls from the bus ahead of me talking. As I approached them one turned around and said "Hello, where are yoou from?", I said "England", they said "Oh, England! How exciting! Maybe we can help you?", I said "oh yes please!" Cue me spending the next hour with them walking around the temple, talking about travelling and what they do (both 22 years old, studying helicopter engineering). One of the girls, Kristine, spoke English quite well and the other one, Masha, could understand quite a bit but only felt confident to speak a few words. After walking around for about an hour, talking and taking pictures, we came to the end of the temple walk. The girls then asked what my plans were for the rest of the day. I said I had none. They then said they had another friend who had a car and we could go to the Ethnological museum just outside the city. Of course I jumped at the chance. We got the bus back to the city centre and then walked down the main pedestrian street to where their friend picked us up. Sasha spoke no English at all so spoke with Masha in the front while me and Kristine sat in the back seat. During the drive I could work out that Masha was telling Sasha about the man on the bus. It was then that Kristine told me that the man was actually telling me the he didn't like England or English people and that the Queen was a bad person. And he seemed so friendly! Oh well... My new friends were very sweet and insisted on buying my ticket for the museum, with Sasha saying "present". The ethnological museum is a big open are museum where there are loads of actual houses from different areas of Russia from the last hundred or so years. The houses have actually been moved from other parts of Russia and rebuilt in the museum. It was really interesting walking around and seeing how people used to live in the past, and comparing the sizes of houses to what we are used to now. We walked aroung the museum for about an hour, during which my new friends asked if I wanted to go to Lake Baikal, two hours drive there and back. I thanked them but explained that I had already been and I think too far for me today. After the museum we drove back to the city and they dropped me at my hostel, not before exchanging Instagram details though!

    So what I have learnt is that in Ulan-Ude, if you look like a tourist you will attract such kind and helpful people, as they are so surprised that you have travelled to their small city far away from Moscow. I don't think i have to tell you that it has been my favourite city in Russia to date.

    So there you have the last of my stories from Russia.

    Before I leave you again here are a few things i have learnt about Russia:
    1. All trains run on Moscow time (which is mighty confusing when the country spans 11 time zones!)
    2. The trains run bang on time.
    3. There is no drainage system in the roads (which means lots of surface water during spring).
    4. Unfortunately (for some western travellers at least) you cannot flush toilet paper, there are seperate bins for that...
    5. Russians have two passports, a domestic and an international passport. Very handy I think.
    6. Unlike other places I have been, you will find many locals living in hostels as they work in other cities for short periods.
    7. There is a statue of Lenin in every city in Russia (and in Ulan-Ude it is just his head, but it is huge!)
    8. Russians like weird statues.
    9. It is not impossible to be Vegan here, but it definitely gets harder the further east you go.
    10. Russia is a MASSIVE country, and one that is definitely worth exploring!

    So that concludes my Russian journey. Next stop Mongolia!

    Dosvidaniya!!
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  • Day11

    Strolling Around Ulan-Ude

    April 16 in Russia

    We didn’t wake up until about 10am this morning which was rather shocking but I guess that’s jet lag for you. We had breakfast at the English pub again which was yummy and then went for a walk to see the main sights of Ulan-Ude. There was a main path to follow around the centre of town starting at a massive statute of Lenin’s head. They have statutes of Lenin everywhere! This one looked rather ominous at night time when it was lit up by lights.

    We had a slight detour to an ice cream shop - Baskin and Robbins or something. Apparently an American brand but I’d never heard of it. Then we continued our stroll. Heidi was entertained by rocks, sticks and steps along the way - who needs toys! It was a sunny day although the wind had quite a bite to it.

    We had a tour booked out to the Old Believer’s village this afternoon and we were being picked up outside our apartment at 3pm so we headed back home to get ready.
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  • Day15

    Back to Ulan-Ude

    April 20 in Russia

    We had to drive back to Ulan-Ude today in preparation for catching the plane early tomorrow morning to Moscow. So once again we packed our bags and headed off after breakfast. Michael had a work meeting he had to attend via Skype for an hour but this gave us time to get ready.

    We decided to stop for one last jaunt over the lake and pulled up where we had stopped for the first sunset the other night. There were a few fishermen out so we became a little braver and walked out further onto the lake. We were curious about the fishing so went to examine one of the holes that had been made. It was actually a lot smaller than we expected, only about 20cm diameter. We could see the ice was quite deep through the hole so that made us feel more secure! The fishermen had a long sort of corkscrew tool they used to make their holes in the ice. We walked past one older guy and he seemed to have more old school tools. His fishing rod only looked like a short stick with a bit of line attached!

    We made our way back to the car, I managed to get a wet foot due to a puddle iced over on top of the ice which was annoying!

    Kyria was keen to go for a hike through the forest and maybe up one of the mountains but we couldn’t find a track that was suitable, either the road was too muddy or there was no where to park the car so we gave up on the plan. It would have been fun!

    We stopped off at Haim where there was a nice river and bridge to get some photos and poke around. The boys has fun skating on the ice on the river - we were waiting for them to skate right off into the river! 😂

    It was an uneventful trip the rest of the way. I had packed a few activity bags for plane trips and car trips so Heidi was suitably amused.

    Back in Ulan-Ude the traffic was a little heavier than on the way out and it was bumper to bumper at times. Heidi’s little voice piped up ‘come on!’ while we were crawling along! 😂 At one point our lane seemed to end abruptly and there was a little chaos as everyone was pushing to the other side of the tram line, in between oncoming trams - no lights, just free for all!

    We are back at the apartment we initially stayed at. The boys have gone to clean the car and return it and I have put Heidi to bed. I only bought four books to read with her. She doesn’t like two of them so we’re only allowed to read the other two. I am so sick of ‘Where is the green sheep’ and ‘We’re going on a bear hunt’ 😩
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  • Day27

    Ust-barguzin to Ulan-Ude

    July 7 in Russia

    Our town, Ust-barguzin on a Saturday morning.
    Last night was a homestay so in the morning Nina our host a retired Cooking Teacher whipped up a traditional Russian breakfast of kasha with sultanas, fried bread buns with cheese and cold meats.
    Then off. Matt has to check out some possible hotels for clients, then onto Olga's for lunch.
    Olga is the French speaking daughter of a former soviet politician so enjoys her summer house with family.
    Olga often entertains foreign tourists and is bit of a story teller.
    Next and final stop, Ulan-Ude and visit Russia's most sacred Buddhist site the spiritual capital if Buddism in Russia. After decades of persecution Stalin approved its initial construction in recognition of the contribution made by these people in The Great Patriotic War.
    Tonight we are under the stars. 5 Star ie, and the view west as Lake Baikal's biggest tributary the Angara River flows to its delta.
    England is leading Sweden 1-0 in World Cup Quarter Final. Wait. It's now England 2 Sweden 0.
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  • Day29

    Moskau nach Vladivostok und zurück nach Ulan-Ude: 12.936 km

    Ulan-Ude ist die Hauptstadt der russischen Teilrepublik Burjatien im südöstlichen Sibirien. Sie hat 404.426 Einwohner und ist das kulturelle, politische und wirtschaftliche Zentrum der Region.

    10.06.2018
    Es ist uns schon vorher aufgefallen wie wenig Alkohol und vor allem Vodka die Russen in der Öffentlichkeit trinken. In den Abteilen der Transsib ist das generell verboten. Auf den Bahnhöfen wird Vodka nur unterhalb des Tischs verkauft. Ich vermute, das die Regierung im Vorfeld der Fußballweltmeisterschaft Russland von seiner besten Seite zeigen will und deshalb viel gegen das weit verbreitete Vorurteil tut, das alle Russen von morgens bis Abend saufen. In Deutschland wird deutlich ungehemmter Alkohol im öffentlichen Bereich konsumiert. Zwischenzeitlich haben wir auch guten Kontakt zu unseren zwei Russen im Vierbettabteil. Beide sind übrigens Antialkoholiker.

    07:00h:
    Die Nacht war ok, obwohl ich wegen meiner fest sitzenden Erkältung immer noch stark husten mußte und meinen drei Mit-Käfigschläfern sicher eine unruhige Nacht beschert habe. Aber all das gehört zu einer authentischen Transsib Reise. Mittlerweile sind wir auf 1.000 Meter über Meeresspiegel.

    12:30h:
    Ich habe die enormen Distanzen und die Bewegungsarmut auf der Transsib erstaunlich gut überstanden. Irgendwie gewöhnt man sich daran. Heidi ist es eher leid. Das liegt aber auch daran, das sie die letzten zwei Nächte kaum geschlafen hat. In Kürze werden wir in Ulan-Ude ankommen. Unser Komfort Hotel ist unmittelbar gegenüber dem Bahnhofsgebäude. Dort werden wir erstmal eine heiße Schauer nehmen und etwas relaxen. Viel Zeit haben wir für diese Stadt nicht. Bereits morgen geht es weiter in Richtung Mongolei. Wir haben jetzt auch wieder die Zeitzone „Irkutsk“. Daher nur noch 5 Stunden Zeitdifferenz zu Moskau, statt 7 Stunden in Vladivostok.

    20:00h:
    Wir sind am Nachmittag in unserer Fünfsterne Herberge www.mergenbator.ru engecheckt. Wirkt aber eher wie ein sehr durchschnittliches Viersternehotel. Egal! Wir sind dann noch drei Stunden durch die schöne Innenstadt von Ulan-Ude gelaufen und haben gut gegessen. Die Stadt ist auf jeden Fall schöner als Vladivostok. Das liegt auch an einer angenehmen Fußgängerzone. Ähnlich wie in Kazan.

    11.06.2018
    Heute gehen wir alles relaxed an und bleiben bis zur Abreise gegen 14:00 im Hotel, da wir das Wesentliche in der Stadt gestern gesehen haben. Außerdem regnet es cat and dogs.

    Wolfgang und Heidi Schneider
    Unser Reiseblog:
    www.findpenguins.com/heidiwolfgang
    www.youtube.com/user/1989ews
    WhatsApp: +49 171 366 5482

    Text von Wolfgang
    ÖFFENTLICH
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  • Day55

    Ulan Ude, Markt

    June 30 in Russia

    Bevor wir morgen Russland verlassen war heute nochmal ein Ruhetag.

    Wir sind Mittags in die Stadt zur Markthalle gelaufen und haben noch etwas eingekauft.

    Dann sind wir in ein Restaurant auf der 10 Etage etwas trinken gewesen, von dort hatte man eine schöne Aussicht auf die Stadt.

    Später sind wir mit der Straßenbahn zum Stellplatz zurück gefahren. Ein echtes Erlebnis...

    Wetter ist heute Bedeckt bei 24 Grad.

    Wenn wir uns in den nächsten Tagen nicht immer melden, dann liegt das an der Netzabdeckung in der Mongolei. Wir sind gespannt.
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  • Day28

    Moskau nach Vladivostok: 9.288 km
    Vladivostok nach Ulan-Ude: 3.648 km

    07.06 Vladivostok- Ulan Ude (train №007H)
    Departure 15.50 – Arrival (10 June 09.20)*
    15.50 (Moscow time) is 22.50 local time (Vladivostok) and 09.20(Moscow time) is 14.20 local time (Ulan Ude)
    Price : 10499 RuR + 7559 RuR= 18058 RuR

    SСНNЕIDЕRGЕВНОFFМАNN Н
    ЗЗ *****1ZF5
    14.11.1958 / Германия / Ж
    Кол-во пассажиров/Number of passengers: 1
    Электронный билет (номер)
    E-ticket number 73981503156653

    SСНNЕIDЕR Е
    ЗЗ *****СКС2
    08.01.1951 / Германия / М
    Кол-во пассажиров/Number of passengers: 1
    Электронный билет (номер)
    E-ticket number 73981503156642

    ВЛАДИВОСТОК - > УЛАН-УДЭ ПАСС
    VLADIVOSTOK - > ULAN-UDE
    Отправление (МСК), Departure (UTC+3) 07.06, 15:50
    Прибытие (МСК), Arrival (UTC+3) 10.06, 09:20

    Поезд, Train 007НА
    Вагон, Coach 10 КУПЕ / COMPARTMENTМесто
    Seat 028 ВЕРХНЕЕ / UPPER

    07.06.2018
    Wir sind am Abend in Richtung Bahnhof gefahren, um mit unserer vorletzten Zugreise in Russland zu starten. Das Warten auf den Zug und der Gepäcktransport bis ins Abteil und dann noch das Verstauen des Gepäcks ist von der ganzen Zugreise der größte Stress. Bin gespannt, ob wir hier in der Hochsicherheitszone der Wartehalle einen Gepäckträger bekommen werden.

    22:20h:
    Wir sind problemlos bis ins Abteil gekommen. Dank eines total sympathischen Gepäckträgers, der unser Hauptgepäck bis ins Abteil gebracht und auch noch verstaut hat. Der war auch noch so aufmerksam uns auf interessante Fotomotive hinzuweisen und hat dann noch einige Fotos von uns gemacht. Für 400 Rubel + 100 Rubel Trinkgeld (500 Rubel = 7 EURO) eine sinnvolle Investition. Aufzüge gibt es auf russischen Bahnhöfen nicht. Dafür aber reichlich Treppen.

    08.06.2018
    In der Nacht sind noch zwei Russen in unser Abteil hinzugekommen. Habe dennoch gut geschlafen. Ich würde mich gerne mit den Russen unterhalten, aber leider geht da ohne Heidi nichts. Im Speisewagen hat mich ein resolutes Weib rausgeschmissen, weil ich eine Stunde zu früh war. Ordnung muß eben sein. Heidi hatte während der Nacht nur zwei fremde Männerbäuche gesichtet und dann schnell wieder die Augenbinde aufgesetzt und versucht weiter zu schlafen. Habe mir einen Instandcafe aufgebrüht und bin damit wieder in den Speisewagen gegangen. Dort wird man eh nur bedient, wenn man sich eine Speisekarte (auf Russisch) besorgt. Der Servicegedanke ist dort noch nicht wirklich angekommen. Liegt aber auch an mir, weil ich Null Russisch spreche. Spätestens wenn man die Russen in ihrer Sprache anspricht, tauen die auf. Das hat Heidi x-Mal bewiesen.

    Im Speisewagen haben wir ein nettes Ehepaar aus München getroffen. Er stark gehbehindert, beide vermutlich etwas älter als wir. Bewundernswert, wie die beiden noch reisen. Mit der Gehbehinderung das Gepäck über unendliche viele Bahnhofstreppen wuchten? Respekt! In Chabarowsk hatten wir wieder 45 Minuten Aufenthalt. Für schlechtes Essen hat es gereicht. Im Speisewagen ein russisches Bier zum Neutralisieren. Gut ist! Das Essen im Zug ist wie gehabt zum Abgewöhnen. Aber bei dem Bewegungsmangel kann ich auf viel Essen gut verzichten. Das die aber im Speisewagen nicht mal Vodka zum Verkauf haben, ist für meine Verkäuferseele nur schwer nachvollziehbar. Auf diesem Zug sind mittlerweile auch diverse Touristen aus England und Korea unterwegs, um sich Spiele der Fußballweltmeisterschaft anzusehen. Die Chance sich zumindest während der Weltmeisterschaft mit besserer Küche und Dienstleistung zu präsentieren ist zumindest bei der Transib auf taube Ohren gestoßen. Hier ist alles auf niedrigsten Service Niveau. Den mitreisenden Russen ist das aber egal. Die kennen das nicht anders.

    09.06.2018
    Die Nacht war ok. Irgendwie gewöhnt man sich an die sehr beengten Verhältnisse. Diese Zugreise ist aber definitiv nichts für Zartbeseitete Zeitgenossen. Der Blick nach draußen offenbart erneut nichts Neues. Weiterhin nur die unendliche grüne Weite. Jetzt noch rund 30 Stunden bis nach Ulan-Ude; dem Abzweigbahnhof nach Süden in die Mongolei und China. Wir haben guten Kontakt zu einem Alleinreisenden Spanier und drei Engländern. Gestern Abend haben wir auch noch “Alina” - eine Russlanddeutsche - getroffen. Meine Hauptgesprächspartner auf diesem Teilabschnitt der Transsib sind aber die Engländer, weil es mir Spaß macht eine gute Konversation mit “nativ speakern” zu haben. Außerdem sind das Fußballfans. Da gibt es immer was zu diskutieren. As a matter of fact, we Germans need the English always in the semis to warm up to win the final match. Hopefully it will be Brazil and not Spain.

    14:30h:
    Mittlerweile ist hier jeder mit jedem befreundet. Das erlebt man so nur auf der Teanssib. Ein interessantes Detail: Vor jedem Tunneleingang der Transib steht ein bewaffneter Wachtposten. Vermutlich auch vor jeder größeren Brücke. Die Transib ist für Russland offensichtlich eine strategisch wichtige Verbindung, die nicht durch einen Anschlag für längere Zeit unterbrochen sein darf.

    19:00h:
    Das Wetter wird deutlich besser und es ist erstmalig das ich einen prall gefüllten Speisewagen auf der Transsib sehe. Heidi hat zwei Essen für uns bestellt. Am Ende stellte sich heraus, dass sie beide Gerichte auf einem Teller serviert bekommen hat. So weit zu den Hürden bei der Kommunikation hier im Zug.

    Text von Wolfgang
    ÖFFENTLICH
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You might also know this place by the following names:

Ivolginskiy Rayon, Иволгинский район

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