Spain
Ourense

Here you’ll find travel reports about Ourense. Discover travel destinations in Spain of travelers writing a travel blog on FindPenguins.

24 travelers at this place:

  • Day653

    Xinzo de Limia

    April 10 in Spain

    We really did feel like we'd regressed back into winter today. On the drive northwards we experienced snow, sleet, hail, rain, fog and sunshine! Climbing up over 1000m we passed the snowline and the forests, whose icing sugar coating had caught our eye from afar, were now around us, their branches heavy with snow. The snow ploughs had obviously been working hard to keep the motorway clear, but there was still one lane cordoned off because it was under snow.

    The van aire at Xinzo de Limia was very different to the rural escape in which we'd spent the last two nights. Mid rise blocks of flats lined the streets of a rather run down area. The stopover was at the end of a road leading to some garages. Scrubby grass grew beyond the pavement and two large guard dogs behind a wire mesh fence barked at anyone they could see. The grotty, cold, wet weather didn't help our impression of the place, but it was free, it provided services and had access to shops, so we decided to stay.

    The temperature didn't rise above 5°C but the sun did come out and we spotted glimpses of a grey horse behind some bushes. In a dry spell we went for a walk along the highstreet and found it to have some good little shops. In the end we had a peaceful night and enjoyed watching the grey horse escape the following morning, to munch on the greener grass that grew on our side of the fence. It soon cantered back through, presumably towards a food tin being rattled somewhere!

    Before leaving we shopped at a well presented fruit and veg store that advertised eco (organic) milk, a baker's and a grocers. All the people serving us were friendly and helpful and it felt good to use these little shops - something we've missed out on somewhat here in Spain, because we've found it difficult getting used to the opening (or rather closing) times and because we've found so many lovely wild camping spots.

    Unfortunately the milk we'd bought hadn't been kept in a fridge and had gone off, so it was no good for Will's tea but made a tasty cauliflower cheese. Also, the pastry Will had bought as a sweet treat turned out to tuna! Oh well, you can't win them all! Not only have the accents changed as we've travelled through different regions of Spain, but the words people use have too. For example, in some places mushrooms are 'hongos', in others the people don't know what you mean when you ask for hongos because they call them 'setas'. We know tuna as 'atun', but the pastry was described with a word we didn't understand. Its an interesting, if difficult feature of this country, that it isn't just the Basque and Catalonian regions that have their own languages.
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  • Day67

    Ourense

    October 12 in Spain

    Den Ort und seine heiße Therme hat mir jemand empfohlen, aber da heute in Spanien national Feiertag ist ging dort die Post ab 😣
    So bin ich hier gelandet mit privater Therme (aber nur 23 Grad)
    Die Nacht Bilder sind noch von gestern; Fisterra

  • Day40

    Soaring high

    May 31 in Spain

    Two days of mountains. Incredible views. Big climbs. Then amazing wonderful walking along long ridge lines - up above the tree line. Really exhilarating. Spain really is a land of mountains.

    It’s been very cold, though mercifully no rain (or only sprinkles) while walking. Last night we were lucky enough to find a restored house in a tiny dot of a mountain village, with roaring wood stove and triple glazing on the windows.

    Today it has been all downhill, back to earth, and staying in an albergue. Where some very kind Italian gentleman insisted I take a bottom bunk. People are so kind. I’m in Laza, in a cozy bar while the rain tumbles on my clean clothes, hanging on a line back at the albergue - too bad, I’m not leaving here to rescue them! And with very sore feet, sore ankles, and sore hips. A few injuries to my feet. I think a rest day is in order.

    Glimpses for the last week of the extraordinary work being done on the high speed rail line. The tunnelling is hard to believe. I can’t imagine how many billions of euros. Yesterday, on a tiny winding narrow mountain road, 7 cement mixer trucks passed us, one after another (with cheerful toots and waves), and lots of other heavy equipment.
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  • Day41

    As I struggled up the 560 metre steep incline I did question my sanity. And contemplate a taxi. But there was no way a car could get onto the narrow shale track - it could only be a helicopter rescue. At which point I ate some chocolate from my secret stash. I do think the Kissing Point Road hill will be a piece of cake after this.

    As always once I reach the top it feels awesome. Today’s peak was marked by a quite famous bar, where pilgrims write their details on a shell which is hung or pasted somewhere in the room. Photo under - me and my gang.Read more

  • Day38

    Climbing mountains

    May 29 in Spain

    Whew! Yesterday was misty, cold and rainy and I was very glad to reach the little hotel in Padornelo just before the water really started to bucket down! It must be one of the best feelings in the world to sit in a warm restaurant looking out through plate glass windows at the rain, knowing you have walked 24km and are done for the day. The hotel was heavily booked with construction workers from the high speed Ave works (train). It must be an economic boon for this area, albeit temporary.

    From Padornelo I set forth this morning not really prepared for the strenuous ups and downs along the mountain path. Up, down, then up, up it seemed to go. Real scrambling in places and twice I lost my footing in mud and heavily decorated myself with Mother Earth. No damage to anything except my dignity.

    Some beautiful scenery, and the sound of water in streams beside the path, and waterfalls. Wading through water at times - when there is a rocky bottom it’s fine - it’s only mud I dislike!

    So eventually I made it to the pass at altitude 1,260 metres, and into Galicia. Then a few more kilometres to my accommodation, a little hotel in Vilavella.

    I think today was only about 20km. But steep. I am looking forward to dinner.
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  • Day42

    A lovely very short 14km walk today. Down into the valleys, along typical Galician lanes, through close settled villages where life is so much softer than up in the mountains. Today I saw roses everywhere and was reminded of my dear friend Catherine, who loved them. The rose photos are for her.

    I and my walking companions could not go past this extraordinary house for tonight’s accommodation - it is like sleeping in a museum. Built in 1776 it stayed in the same family, none of whom ever threw anything away, and one of whom became a minister under Franco. He restored the house luxuriously and collected even more extraordinary objects. Eventually it passed out of that family. It is now owned by a man from Philadelphia who fell in love with it while walking the Camino and bought it lock stock and barrel (and tortoise shells, and masks from Guatemala, chess sets from China, elephant tusks, knives from Borneo, carvings from Japan, etc, etc). The wine collection alone is huge - I only got a glimpse of the cellar - with racks and racks of dust covered bottles.Read more

  • Day43

    Flowers and coloured sand patterns outside the churches for Corpus Christi (don’t ask) and. —- pulpo! Delicious.

    But a long walk into Ourense - or at least it felt long - and my feet do not look objects of beauty. Or feel good. Cracked heels. My own fault, not paying them enough attention and not moisturising. Tomorrow I might look for a podiatrist to patch me up so I can make the final push to Santiago. Only 100km to go.

    How do you tell a pilgrim? She puts beauty cream on her feet before her face.

    In Ourense we traipsed down to the thermal baths and soaked for an hour. Bliss! And it is free.
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  • Day45

    The last 100km!

    June 5 in Spain

    I spent two days in Ourense. A spa town since Roman times. Ostensibly to give some injuries time to heel - but also to lie languorously in thermal pools. And - wow! - soak the ingrained dirt out of my feet. Dirty feet are the price paid for walking in sandals through mud and slush. Ourense also has some rather good confiterías. Which required my attention.

    Today I left Ourense and braved the constant rain and climbed out of the valley of the River Miño. A 19% slope for 2km (corrected from 5!). Then it was all soft paths and lush green forests. But still very very wet. A stop for coffee with Cesar - a retired lorry driver who offers pilgrims hot soup (much appreciated) and home made cakes.

    I am now ensconced in a little room with private bathroom - for €10. Too good to miss.
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  • Day21

    Ourense to Cea

    September 18, 2017 in Spain

    It is good to be back in Galicia! Portugal is wonderful but I am tired of walking on cobblestones and the albergues are full. We took the train to Ourense this morning and started walking to Santiago. Light rain today but everything is pretty and green with soft trails and lots of shade. So far only 4 of us in the albergue and we only saw two other people on the trail. No internet again tonight.

  • Day3

    On the way

    April 29 in Spain

    Got the train from Madrid and arrived at about 6 pm in Ourense We got our “credentials”, the pilgrim passport needed to stay in the pilgrim hostels at the cathedral. Tonight is our first night in a room with 10 bunk beds. Here, Rob catches an oncoming shower as it approaches the cathedral st Ourense. Tomorrow the walking begins

You might also know this place by the following names:

Provincia de Ourense, Ourense, Orense, Província d'Ourense, オレンセ(オウレンセ)

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