Tanzania
Mwanza

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Top 10 Travel Destinations Mwanza

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11 travelers at this place

  • Day93

    Mwanza

    August 7, 2017 in Tanzania ⋅ 🌙 19 °C

    Drove out of the Serengeti and to the bustling town of Mwanza. What a beautiful town! It’s set on the shores of Lake Victoria and many homes are built into the very scenic surrounding hills of boulders. We camped on the lawn of a yacht club. While this sounds fancy, it was fairly run down with no hot water, but did have a beautiful view of the hills and city. Here, we ran into a few other self-drivers and exchanged some tips and stories before carrying on towards Rwanda.Read more

  • Day16

    Journey from Mwanza to Musoma

    December 10, 2019 in Tanzania ⋅ ☁️ 20 °C

    The waves were gently lapping the lake shore as I awoke with a good night's sleep, after I had given up trying to mend the broken zip on my tent - luckily it didn't rain. I ordered an omelette and beans from the camp restaurant and ate it by the beach with the wide view over the lake and watched the many long, thin fishing boats bobbing over the calm waters. Midge like flies attended the shore and hoards of small insects had invaded the fly sheet of my tent as I packed it away. This lake shore was teeming with life, both welcome and unwelcome. After admiring the beautiful view one more time, and with a kite swooping low over my head, I boarded the truck for the next stage of our journey through Africa. It was another long trip to our next campsite on another lake shore beach. We drove back through Mwanza which was a very scruffy and dilapidated town, contrasted with the beautiful rounded rock formations that rise above it on all sides. The morning Tanzanian rush hour was in full swing. We headed out of Mwanza into a flat plained, heavily cultivated area, with women and their very young children tilling.and hoeing the fields, all waving back with big smiles as we passed. The land was still interspersed with these large and fascinating rock formations. As we crossed a river which had burst its banks, we could see the extent of the flooding in the agricultural land all around. Dozens of small, bright blue and red lizards had taken refuge on the roadside and scampered over the hot surface. Further on, there were more traditional thatched roundhouses mixed with more recent mud-brick budings and other more modern buildings in the towns with corrugated iron rooves. Women carried large loads of vegetables in sacks on their heads and wore their traditional highly patterned wraparound dresses. We waved and were waved back to by countless adults and children with smiles and acknowledgements. We passed the western edge of the Serenghetti reserve and saw zebra, impala and wildebeest in the far distance. There was another badly flooded river which extended flood waters far out into the Serengeti plains. The landscape was enclosed by a long line rocky mountains which dominated the skyline for many miles. We stopped for lunch in a small town in the shadow of the mountains, and I enjoyed some beans in sauce, spinach, vegetables and a flavoured rice. As we continued our journey after lunch, the landscape opened out again into huge wide plains and deep green mountains. The afternoon storm clouds began to gather in immense plumes over the mountains and we were soon engulfed in heavy rain and a lightning storm. We had to stop to buy food at a local supermarket and a fruit and vegetables market. There was a lot of flooding and those of us food shopping got absolutely soaked. We arrived at the 'Tembo Beach Hotel' in heavy rain with the lake waves smashing into the front wall and sending plumes of water spray high into the air. The nearby camping ground did not look inviting and all but one of us decided to upgrade to rooms. I booked a nice twin room with my colleague and 'roomy' Brian. We had a late dinner, and I had a great conversation about sports, politics and the environment with a young Canadian fellow traveller, Vincent. I got an early night as we had another very early start at 6am the following day.Read more

  • Day59

    Rwanda to Tanzania

    November 13, 2019 in Tanzania ⋅ ⛅ 5 °C

    The time has come to cross into Tanzania and tick another country off the list.

    There are a couple of methods to get from Rwanda to Tanzania, but, given the distances involved, the sensible option is to fly. We do not take the sensible option. Instead, we opt for a multi-day overland slog through the sparsely populated western-Tanzania.

    To get to the Rwanda/Tanzania border, we take a minibus from Kigali to the border town of Rusumo Falls. There, we find a guesthouse to stay the night before crossing the border in the morning.

    The guesthouse is very basic- it is around the back of a small bar, and the concrete rooms feature an open-plan bedroom/bathroom situation. It's the most basic place we'll stay in, but it's cheap, the owner is friendly (and fluent in English -he studied at the University of Hull), and it's very close to the border. Before we leave, the owner gives us tips on crossing the border, including the advice to watch our pockets on the other side of the border- "Tanzania is not like Rwanda", he says.

    In the morning, we walk the few kilometres across no-mans land between the two countries. It's early morning, but it's already hot, and carrying our bags up the hill is a challenge.

    Martyn and Laura have already booked their visas online, so are able to get into Tanzania in record time. We, however, opt to get them on arrival, which takes considerably longer, not least because we have to pay for them at a bank kiosk which is unmanned.

    And then, once we're through, we get an unexpected stroke of good luck. We had been worried about the bus situation here at the border- some reports suggest that we would have to get a taxi to the nearest city, then get a bus wherever we can. Fortunately, there is a bus waiting to take us to Mwanza, a considerable distance towards our destination of Arusha. After causing a confusing argument between the conductors and the guy who acts as our agent, we're welcomed aboard. It's a big bus and quite comfortable, with loud east-African music videos being played on the TVs.

    We reach Mwanza at night, after crossing a ferry and making up the last few kilometres into town in a minibus (they're called Dalla Dallas here), which is so full that Chris ends up sat on the gearbox, moving every time the driver makes a gear change.

    We get a taxi from the minibus stand to our accommodation for a really low price, without any bargaining. Navigating through the darkness, our driver points out Lake Victoria (which we can't see), and telling us that Mwanza is known as "Rock City!". Because of the geology, not the music scene.

    The next morning, we wake early to catch the 6am bus to Arusha. We don't do much research, and just jump into the first bus we find.

    For a while, it's an uneventful journey, but the landscape is interesting. It's very sparsely populated, and the beige plains are occasionally interrupted by large rock formations that tower over the surrounding country. They look as though they could have inspired Pride Rock. Chris makes a note to look up the geology of the area to learn something more about it, but to date has not done so.

    Then, our of nowhere, the bus violently swerves across the road and back again, leaving the confines of the highway and skidding across the gravel. We safely make it back onto the road, and everyone looks back out of the window to see and large crowd around a girl, who must have been hit by the bus. The driver, after waiting for a couple of seconds, puts the coach into gear and leaves the scene. We're confused as to what's happening, and at the next town, a policeman gets on the bus and instructs the driver to head to the police station, where he's promptly arrested. We learn that, fortunately, the girl had not been seriously injured, as it wasn't a head-on collision. We wait for around an hour for a new driver to arrive to take us the remaining distance.

    Arriving into Arusha, our tour guide, that we've booked the Ngorogoro tour with, picks us up from the bus station and takes us to our comfortable accommodation for a good night's sleep.
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  • Day47

    Victoriameer

    October 27, 2016 in Tanzania ⋅ ⛅ 25 °C

    Om na 'n week se sinkplaatslaggatstofpad weer teerpad onder die Fortuner se wiele te voel - lekker! Dis hartseer om tot siens te sê vir die Serengeti en sy wemelende vlaktes, maar verfrissend om Victoriameer se waters te sien. Ons slaap vanaand - op beddens vir 'n verandering - by Tunza Resort in Mwanza, 'n woelige hawestad op die meer.Read more

  • Day47

    Kom ons bespreek: Serengeti Lager

    October 27, 2016 in Tanzania ⋅ ⛅ 25 °C

    Vernoem na een van Afrika se grootste wildkykareas - en met 'n forse luiperd op die etiket - jy weet mos dit gaan goed wees! Serengeti het nie veel van 'n smaak nie: dis bier, en dis dit. Maar sy 4.8% skop nogals. Dit gaan goed af hier waar ek nou vir die horison van die Victoriameer sit en wag om die sakkende son in te sluk. Tussen teue droom ek van die Serengeti, en veral gisteroggend se luiperd, rustend op 'n boomtak.Read more

  • Day7

    Mwanza

    April 30, 2019 in Tanzania ⋅ 🌧 25 °C

    Von Kahama geht es am nächsten Tag weiter nach Mwanza zum Viktoriasee.
    Ein Taxi bringt uns vom Busstand in Neygobo zu einem Hotel in Mwanza City.
    In Mwanza bleiben wir 2 Nächte um etwas den Viktoriasee erkunden zu können.
    Es ist ein sehr großer See, der an Uganda, Kenia und Tansania grenzt.
    Ein “Guide“ führt uns über Felsvorsprünge zu schönen Aussichtspunkte und erzählt uns etwas über den See und die Stadt Mwanza.
    Schwimmen kann man leider nicht, so sitzen wir nur auf Felsen, und blicken auf das nicht besonders klare Wasser. Natürlich gibt es den 1. Sonnenbrand inklusive.
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You might also know this place by the following names:

Mwanza Region, Mwanza, Mkoa wa Mwanza

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