United States
Garden District

Here you’ll find travel reports about Garden District. Discover travel destinations in the United States of travelers writing a travel blog on FindPenguins.

29 travelers at this place:

  • Day8

    Garden district

    May 18, 2017 in the United States

    Onze laatste dag in NOLA: goed gestart met een stevig ontbijt bij Ruby Slipper. Met de streetcar reden we naar het Garden District om foto's te nemen en de Lafayette-begraafplaats te bezoeken. Ook iets gedronken in het Irish Channel en dan te voet over Magazine Street naar het Ogden National Museum voor Southern Art; echt wel de moeite. Vanavond schakelen we over van vis naar vlees. We starten met Cajun kitchen en kijken uit naar BBQ!Read more

  • Day16

    New Orleans, LA

    November 2, 2016 in the United States

    Gators and Po' boys, that's the word.

    At last a stop long enough to catch our breath! Have thoroughly enjoyed this city and it's culture. The effects of Katrina almost 11 years ago are still vivid and the city breathes it's lessons learned. The Mississippi is largely invisible, due to the tall levees which constrain it's flow - a weird feeling given the significance it has for the city.

    Two (of many) unique features of this city took me. The first is that the majority of the city is built below sea level. It sounds ridiculous but you rarely see the river as the levels are several stories tall and most of the buildings aren't. Built on a delta created by the river itself, there's literally not a hill in sight. The bridges are probably the highest points in town, built that way to allow giant supertankers to pass underneath. Instead of free draining storm and waste water, all of these are directed to pumping pits which pump the water back up to the Mississippi. I needn't paint the picture in heavy rain, or worse; a levee breach.

    The second is above ground cemeteries. Due to the relatively high water table, burying bodies below ground was not a viable option. Instead, bodies are buried in above ground tombs, 2-12 feet high. Each tomb can contain multiple corpses, which are entombed individually in coffins and decay in approximately one year. When a relative dies, the tomb is reopened, coffin removed, bones layed in a hole at the back of the tomb and the tomb shelf restacked with the 'new dead'. So what happened during Katrina when the cemetery was in flood? Floating tombs. Ew.

    We managed to book ourselves into a swamp tour at Honey Island, just on the outskirts of the city. Until now I struggled to see the interest in a swamp. The word itself just wreeks of awful connotations; mosquitos, mud, flies, gators, stench...I'm sure I could go on. Zapping around on the boat in the wider stretches was actually really pleasant. All the wildlife cane out to party - alligators, turtles, and a myriad of birds and the scenery was unique. Little fishing are vacation homes dotted the rivers edge to make just like the movie sets. A great way to blow out the cobwebs from the night before.

    We also visited the WW2 museum which came as a surprise in two ways. One - it was in located in Luisiana (significance still unknown), and two - it was top pick on trip advisor of over 50 museums. Needless to say it was impressive! Three buildings big with a few more to come!

    One thing I couldn't get over the whole time we were there was the infrastructure. The current population is around 450,000 people which is slightly less than that of Wellington. It'd be fair to note is was about 650,000 before Katrina but we'll keep that aside for some hyperbole. The roading network is absurd. Two to six lane freeways extend in every direction leading out of the city - almost entirely suspended. To put it simply - their whole freeway system is a network of really long to really freaking long bridges. One of the lake Pontchatrain bridges was the longest in the world until Macau surpassed it. Where these freeways converge, roads tier four levels high in numerous locations. Yet public transport is close to non-existant, and public rail IS non existant (save for the trams which have 2 short lines). It absolutely baffles me how this system stacks up, especially with the evidently large low socio economic areas.

    Such a unique city. Go figure.
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  • Day5

    National WWII Museum, New Orleans

    December 4, 2014 in the United States

    To a walk to the warehouse district and the Nation World War 2 Museum. A nice few hours in a great museaum. They have an Enigma machine there. Check out the Normandy Liberty Bell.

  • Day22

    Dag 16 - New Orleans baby

    August 27 in the United States

    Vandaag werden we wakker en moesten we snel snel zonder ontbijt om acht uur ons vliegtuig hebben. Dit is om zes uur op de luchthaven zijn, dus om vijf uur opstaan. Voordeel: geen ontbijt betekent ook niets dat er uit kan komen bij Eva, dus ze hield het droog deze keer.

    Met Uber gingen we van de luchthaven naar Creole Gardens, ons gezellig, kleurrijk hotel voor de komende drie nachten. Vandaag bezochten we vooral het Franse gedeelte van New Orleans. We zagen er toeristische valletjes, kerstwinkels en restaurants. Zo hebben we al onze volgende Kerstballen gespot (naakte zeemeermannen) en een pikante saus winkel bezocht. Na een tijdje rondwandelen, besloten we ons energiepeil op te krikken met de bekendste specialiteit van NOLA (New Orleans): beignets van Café du Monde met chichorei koffie. Deze vette deegbollen waren best lekker en iets vaster dan die we gewend zijn. Ook ontdekten we een gezellige bar waar we de volgende drie avonden zouden doorbrengen.

    's Avonds gingen we wat verse vis en zeevruchten eten, een tweede specialiteit van hier. Dit zorgde wel voor serieus wat gerommel in onze maag, want zoveel gefrituurd eten zijn we niet gewend. Ook qua weer was het gerommel: een gigantisch onweer met flitswerk speelde zich af net buiten NOLA.
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  • Day22

    Dag 17 - Gumbo food tour

    August 27 in the United States

    Vandaag hadden we een food tour gereserveerd bij Doctor Gumbo. Desondanks gingen we toch voor de spek met eieren combinatie: best stevig voor zo'n food tour.

    Zo stevig dat we nadien gewoon terug twee uur gaan slapen zijn, tja, de vermoeidheid moet er ooit uitkomen zeker?

    De food tour was echt geweldig. Ben, onze joviale gids, wist ons te verbazen met allerlei weetjes en feiten over de geschiedenis van NOLA en het eten dat hier bekend is. En nog beter: we mochten alles proeven: gefrituurde varkenshuid, kruidige garnaalbeignets, boudain balletjes, pikante saus, poboys (soort broodje), gumbo ... Wegspoelen van al dat lekkers deden we met verschillende cocktails. De tour sloten we af op een balkon waar we een zicht hadden op enkele straten en een park. Je kunt je niet voorstellen wat voor taferelen je allemaal ziet als je in NOLA even je aandacht op de mensen vestigt. Een kleine greep uit wat we zagen: een dwerg die ruzie had met een verslaafde en het op een lopen zette na het roepen van Crackhead, een dakloze die zijn super saiyan krachten aan het oefenen was, een vrouw die met haar veel te kleine outfit alle andere mensen aan het verleiden of ambeteren was ... Te gek voor woorden deze stad en zeker de mensen die er wonen.

    Ook kwamen we toevallig nog een parade tegen waar voornamelijk de zwarte gemeenschap van NOLA stond. Helemaal welkom leken we er niet als blanke, maar toch hebben we het even kunnen bekijken: chique auto's, dansende schoolkinderen, muziek, verklede mensen ...

    's Avonds hebben we een wandeling gemaakt door Bourbon Street, de feest- en zuipstraat. Ook daar wist je niet waar eerst kijken: kinderen die om 00:00 nog aan het rondlopen waren en twerklessen kregen van andere volwassenen, allerlei vrouwen waarvan je niet wist hoe ze ooit in hun outfit zijn geraakt, ,wildplassende mannen in het midden van de straat, strippers om 22:00 ... Wederom: gekke stad, met nog gekker (zattere) mensen.

    Afsluiten deden we in "ons" gezellig barretje met wat bier en ze pizzapunt van drie dollar.
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  • Day167

    Last Day in Jazz City

    January 9 in the United States

    Cemeteries are often sites of interest particularly in a historic town or where the cemetery is unusual. New Orleans is an old town so there is historical significance to their cemeteries but also the city itself is very low lying and susceptible to flooding so no ground burials are possible. La Fayette is an historical cemetery seen often in movies where all coffins are interned in burial crypts. The cemetery has rows and rows of them. Some are old, crumbling and neglected, others equally as old have been well maintained over the years and hold many generations of the families.
    Although a bit of a hike to The Garden District and the cemetery, we decided to walk. That way we could enjoy the different architecture in this district. This was the British side of the city. The houses are built on larger parcels of land and many of them quite substantial and beautiful. The area has been home to Anne Rice and Nicholas Cage, to name just two notables.
    Cemeteries are for burying the dead and La Fayette is still in use so I guess it should not have come as a surprise that when we got there it was closed for a funeral. We had passed a coffee shop back on the corner. Time for lunch. We had also passed a hairdresser so once lunch was taken care of Neil inquired as to whether or not he could have a haircut. Yes come back in an hour.
    We thought we could go back to the cemetery, have a walk around and return for the appointment. Cemetery still closed for another two funerals. We passed the time chatting to a lovely young Canadian couple until haircut time.
    Haircut done we returned for a last attempt. Others were leaving, cemetery closed for the day. I thought that at least I would get some photos through the gates. As we arrived a caretaker was in the process of locking the gates but was allowing people in if they would exit on the far side and no later than 3.30pm or be locked in for the night. We were the last two in. Yes we would be out by 3.30. No way would I be spending a night in a cemetery, particularly this one. A hound was balefully crying in the distance and I kept expecting the Voo-Doo man to spring out from behind a crypt “Live and Let Die’ style. Perhaps I have seen too many movies.
    On the way back we caught one of the cities beautiful old trolleys. They are originals, at least a hundred years old and kept in mint condition.
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  • Day112

    Sjømannskirken

    April 19, 2015 in the United States

    vi ble veldig godt tatt imot på kirken, veldig hyggelig å komme dit. Men det var rart å høre norsk igjen! rommet var mye bedre enn jeg hadde forventet til prisen. de hadde også noen helt nye leiligheter som så veldig fine ut, men de var litt utenfor vår prisklasse. vi satte egentlig bare fra oss sekkene og gikk rett seng, veldig greit å ta buss men vanskelig å få skikkelig søvn så var ganske slitne.
    etter noen timer søvn gikk vi ut av rommet igjen og fikk vite at det var familiegudstjeneste og middag, og at vi var hjertelig velkommen til å delta på begge eller bare middagen. vi valgte å gå en tur på butikken isteden for å være med på gudstjenesten, men ble med på middagen.
    Hjemmelagde kjøttkaker og brunsaus! Middagen var himmelsk! det første hjemmelagde måltidet på lenge, og det første norske måltidet på enda lengre! fantastisk deilig.
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  • Day113

    Buckner Mansion

    April 20, 2015 in the United States

    Eller Miss Robichaux’s Academy for exceptional young ladies, som en vær American Horror Story fan vil kjenne det igjen som. vi har i det siste vert veldig hektet på AHS og sett nye eppisoder ver gang vi har hatt bra nok Internett. vi så det siste av sesong 3 i Orlando. det gøye er at nettopp sesong 3 tar plass i New Orleans! vi måtte selfølgelig finne ut hvor dette huse lå, og det viste seg å bare være rett borti gaten i Garden district!Read more

  • Day114

    Streetcar

    April 21, 2015 in the United States

    som wikipedia så fint sier det "Streetcars in New Orleans, Louisiana have been an integral part of the city's public transportation network since the first half of the 19th century. The longest of New Orleans' streetcar lines, the St. Charles Avenue line, is the oldest continuously operating street railway system in the world"
    denne historiske delen av New Orleans var veldig praktisk, det var billig og det gikk en vogn mellom sentrum og bare ett kvartal unna kirken.Read more

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Garden District

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