Uzbekistan
Bukhara

Here you’ll find travel reports about Bukhara. Discover travel destinations in Uzbekistan of travelers writing a travel blog on FindPenguins.

34 travelers at this place:

  • Day10

    Goodbye Turkmenistan

    May 17 in Uzbekistan ⋅ ⛅ 26 °C

    Well I’m glad I visited as there were some interesting sights but when I reached Bukhara in Uzbekistan I actually felt as though I was back in comfortable territory.
    Yesterday I visited the ruins of Margush, which flourished between the 3rd and 1st centuries BC. The site is still being studied by archeologists and quite amazingly you can walk over it all, I actually worried I was destroying 2000 year old UNESCO world heritage listed walls as we clambered about. There are pieces of broken 2000 year old pottery all over the place, if it were nearly anywhere else the place would be roped off.
    Today we spent time in the ruins of the ancient city of Merv before heading to the border where I said goodbye to my guide Olga and after 1.5 hours including two short bus trips made it across the 1.5km border area and into Uzbekistan again.
    Tonight I’m in Bukhara which is a good city from what I have seen. My hotel is in the middle of the old city which is great for walking around .
    Tomorrow I get down to a day of serious sight seeing here.
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  • Day25

    Bukhara

    August 22 in Uzbekistan ⋅ ☀️ 36 °C

    Bukhara leek wat op Samarkand, maar dan kleiner en gezelliger. In centrum kan je verdwalen tussen de vele mooie moskeeën, madrassa's, caravanserai en overdekte markthallen. Mooie uitzichten vanop rooftops en uitgebreid dineren bij de familie van ons guesthouse maakten het plaatje compleet!

  • Day33

    Mosques, madrassas & minarets

    June 17 in Uzbekistan ⋅ ☀️ 32 °C

    It was a relief to finally arrive in the pleasant city of Bukhara- until we stepped off the bus into 35 degrees! Escaping into the cool of our lovely hotel, we were even more delighted to discover fully functional plumbing in our room. After a quick shower it was off to a football match between the local team and the hot favourites from Tashkent. It felt great to be experiencing a slice of life for a short while, instead of visiting yet another tourist destination. The match was pretty one-sided (5-0 to the visitors) but still good entertainment and the indigo blue sky as the sun set was spectacular. Females over the age of 10 were pretty much non-existent, despite there being no restrictions on their attendance. We'd got used to being stared at and photographed a while back.

    At its peak, the ancient city of Bukhara boasted 250 madrassas, 200 minarets and a mosque for everyday of the year. By this stage of our trip, we'd seen our fair share of each of these, as we travelled through the predominantly Muslim countries of Kyrgyzstan and Uzbekistan (as well as Western China). So it wasn't surprising that monument burnout was beginning to set in. However, Bukhara still had a few surprises in store for us.

    The 10th century tomb of Ismail Samani, founder of the cultured Samani dynasty, was one such surprise. Cleverly designed using basket-weave brickwork, it reflects the status of science in society at the time, with its mathematically derived form. There's a legend that if one particular brick was removed, the entire building would collapse. So it's basically a giant Jinga game! Apparently it survived the perils of the Mongols because Ismail instructed his army to cover it with sand. When Genghis Khan arrived, he found only a large mound. Clever!

    The Ark is the heart of ancient Bukhara, around which the city has formed. Fortified, destroyed and rebuilt many times, this complex of buildings became home to the emirs (leaders). From the roadside, with the cars buzzing by, this spectacular structure seemed quite otherworldly.

    A welcome afternoon rest from the oppressive heat, followed by a visit to the Kalon Minaret and Mosque (where I managed to lose my hat). At the time it was built (1127), the minaret was probably the world's tallest building. Apparently Genghis Khan was so awestruck that it was spared from the general Mongol destruction policy. The minaret was nicknamed the "Tower of Death" in the 19th century, when criminals were tied in sacks and hurled over the side.

    Dinner turned into a repeat of at least 3 previous experiences, in which my meal failed to materialize! "We don't have ...." I'm told, once the rest of the party has finished eating. Just as well there's plenty of bread!
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  • Day36

    Lebensmittelvergiftung?

    August 31 in Uzbekistan ⋅ ⛅ 23 °C

    Auf dem Weg mussten wir vielen nicht vorhandenen Gullideckeln ausweichen. Seitdem der Schrottpreis gestiegen ist, sind da nämlich öfters welche weg. Zum Glück waren unsere Ausweichmanöver immer erfolgreich.

    Nicht so erfolgreich ging es unseren Mägen. Die wahrscheinlich zu erwartenden Verdauungsprobleme aufgrund der für uns mangelhaften Hygiene in den Ländern machten uns zu schaffen. Wodurch es nun wirklich kam, konnten wir nicht feststellen. Wir freuten uns jedenfalls über jede Toilette. Und mussten Mittag sogar eine Pause im Schatten am Straßenrand einlegen um uns beide zu erholen.

    Angekommen in Buxoro fanden wir eine wunderschöne Stadt vor. Für uns ist es die schönste Seidenstraßenstadt, denn die Altstadt ist noch völlig intakt und abgetrennt vom Rest der Stadt.
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  • Day36

    Buxoro unsere Perle

    August 31 in Uzbekistan ⋅ ⛅ 22 °C

    Um den Abend ausklingen zu lassen, machen wir noch einen Spaziergang. Und für unsere kranken Bäuche gibt es heute nur eine Suppe und eine Kanne Tee. Das tut uns auf jeden Fall gut.

    Mal sehen wie es morgen aussieht.

  • Day52

    Boukhara 1

    September 25 in Uzbekistan ⋅ ⛅ 24 °C

    Il est agréable de se perdre dans les rues étroites de la vieille ville de Boukhara et de se laisser surprendre. Le nombre de mosquées, medressas et mausolées est impressionnant et laisse imaginer à quel point ça devait être plein d'intellos ici...

  • Day118

    Bukhara at night

    September 8, 2018 in Uzbekistan ⋅ 🌙 21 °C

    08.09.2018
    Wir haben nach dem Abendessen noch einen Spaziergang durch diese tolle Stadt voller History gemacht. Die Altstadt ist sehr gut saniert und vor allem Autofrei. Unser Hotel liegt unmittelbar angrenzend an die Altstadt.

    Wikipedia:
    Bukhara (Uzbek Latin: Buxoro; Uzbek Cyrillic: Бухорo; پارسی : بخارا) is a city in Uzbekistan. Bukhara is rich in historical sites, with about 140 architectural monuments. The nation's fifth-largest city, it had a population of 247,644 as of 31 August 2016. People have inhabited the region around Bukhara for at least five millennia, and the city has existed for half that time. The mother tongue of the majority of people of Bukhara is Tajik. Located on the Silk Road, the city has long served as a center of trade, scholarship, culture, and religion. UNESCO has listed the historic center of Bukhara (which contains numerous mosques and madrasas) as a World Heritage Site. The history of Bukhara stretches back millennia. It is now the capital of Bukhara Region (viloyat) of Uzbekistan. Located on the Silk Road, the city has long been a center of trade, scholarship, culture, and religion. During the golden age of the Samanids, Bukhara became a major intellectual center of the Islamic world, second only to Baghdad. The historic center of Bukhara, which contains numerous mosques and madrassas, has been listed by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site. Bukhara has been one of the main centres of world civilisation from its early days in 6th century BCE. From the 6th century CE, Turkic speakers gradually moved in. Its architecture and archaeological sites form one of the pillars of Central Asian history and art. The region of Bukhara was a part of the Persian Empire for a long time. The origin of many of its current inhabitants goes back to the period of Aryan immigration into the region. The Samanid Empire seized Bukhara, the capital of Greater Khorasan, in 903 CE. Genghis Khan besieged Bukhara for fifteen days in 1220 CE. As an important trading centre, Bukhara was home to a community of medieval Indian merchants from the city of Multan (modern-day Pakistan) who were noted to own land in the city.

    Editiert am 25.03.2019
    Text von Wolfgang
    ÖFFENTLICH
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  • Day120

    Bukhara

    September 10, 2018 in Uzbekistan ⋅ ☀️ 31 °C

    09.09.2018
    Nachdem wir noch im Inneren einer nicht mehr genutzten „Medrese” gewesen sind, haben wir unsere sehr interessante Tour durch das „Open Air Museum of Bukhara” beendet. Generell gibt es hier mehr Touristen als Einheimische. Trotzdem stört mich das hier nicht. Am Ende der Führung haben wir das Live-Fotoshooting von 2 Hochzeitspaaren erleben dürfen. Interessant ist, dass die Braut in Usbekistan weder lächeln noch lachen darf.

    10.09.2018
    Wir besichtigen die ehemalige Mosque „Muzaffarxon masjidi”. Wir sind mit einem Minibus und einigen Einheimischen zum „Enid’s Summer Palace” gefahren. Auch diese Anlage liegt etwas außerhalb von Bukhara.

    Wikipedia:
    Kalyan minaret:
    More properly, Minâra-i Kalân, (Persian/Tajik for the "Grand Minaret"). Also known as the Tower of Death, as according to legend it is the site where criminals were executed by being thrown off the top for centuries. The minaret is most famed part of the ensemble, and dominates over historical center of the city. The role of the minaret is largely for traditional and decorative purposes—its dimension exceeds the bounds of the main function of the minaret, which is to provide a vantage point from which the muezzin can call out people to prayer. For this purpose it was enough to ascend to a roof of mosque. This practice was common in initial years of Islam. The word "minaret" derives from the Arabic word "minara" ("lighthouse", or more literally "a place where something burn"). The minarets of the region were possible adaptations of "fire-towers" or lighthouses of previous Zoroastrian eras. The architect, whose name was simply Bako, designed the minaret in the form of a circular-pillar brick tower, narrowing upwards. The diameter of the base is 9 meters (30 feet), while at the top it is 6 m (20 ft). The tower is 45.6 m (150 ft) high, and can be seen from vast distances over the flat plains of Central Asia. There is a brick spiral staircase that twists up inside around the pillar, leading to the landing in sixteen-arched rotunda and skylight, upon which is based a magnificently designed stalactite cornice (or "sharif").[16]

    Kalân Mosque (Masjid-i Kalân):
    Arguably completed in 1514, is equal to the Bibi-Khanym Mosque in Samarkand in size. The mosque is able to accommodate twelve thousand people. Although Kalyan Mosque and Bibi-Khanym Mosque of Samarkand are of the same type of building, they are different in terms of art of building. Two hundred and eighty-eight monumental pylons serve as a support for the multi-domed roofing of the galleries encircling the courtyard of Kalyan Mosque. The longitudinal axis of the courtyard ends up with a portal to the main chamber (maksura) with a cruciform hall, topped with a massive blue cupola on a mosaic drum. The edifice keeps many architectural curiosities, for example, a hole in one of domes. Through this hole one can see foundation of Kalyan Minaret. Then moving back step by step, one can count all belts of brickwork of the minaret to the rotunda.

    Editiert am 25.03.2019
    Text von Wolfgang
    ÖFFENTLICH
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  • Day120

    Bukhara

    September 10, 2018 in Uzbekistan ⋅ ☀️ 33 °C

    09.09.2018
    Nachdem wir noch im Inneren einer nicht mehr genutzten „Medrese” gewesen sind, haben wir unsere sehr interessante Tour durch das „Open Air Museum of Bukhara” beendet. Generell gibt es hier mehr Touristen als Einheimische. Trotzdem stört mich das hier nicht. Am Ende der Führung haben wir das Live-Fotoshooting von 2 Hochzeitspaaren erleben dürfen. Interessant ist, dass die Braut in Usbekistan weder lächeln noch lachen darf.

    Wikipedia:
    Mir-i Arab Madrassah (1535–1536):
    The construction of Mir-i-Arab Madrasah (Miri Arab Madrasah) is ascribed to Sheikh Abdullah Yamani of Yemen—called Mir-i-Arab—the spiritual mentor of Ubaidullah-khan and his son Abdul-Aziz-khan. Ubaidullah-khan waged permanent successful war with Iran. At least three times his troops seized Herat. Each of such plundering raids on Iran was accompanied by capture of great many captives. They say that Ubaidullah-khan had invested money gained from redemption of more than three thousand Persian captives into construction of Mir-i-Arab Madrasah. Ubaidullah-khan was very religious. He had been nurtured in high respect for Islam in the spirit of Sufism. His father named him in honor of prominent sheikh of the 15th century Ubaidullah al-Ahrar (1404–1490), by origin from Tashkent Region. By the thirties of the 16th century the time, when sovereigns erected splendid mausoleums for themselves and for their relatives, was over. Khans of Shaibanid dynasty were standard-bearers of Koran traditions. The significance of religion was so great that even such famed khan as Ubaidullah was conveyed to earth close by his mentor in his madrasah. In the middle of the vault (gurhana) in Mir-i-Arab Madrasah is situated the wooden tomb of Ubaidullah-khan. At his head is wrapped in the moulds his mentor, Mir-i-Arab. Muhammad Kasim, mudarris (a senior teacher) of the madrasah (died in 1047 hijra) is also interred near by here. The portal of Miri Arab Madrasah is situated on one axis with the portal of the Kalyan Mosque. However, because of some lowering of the square to the east it was necessary to raise a little an edifice of the madrasah on a platform.

    The Lab-i Hauz:
    (or Lab-e hauz, Persian: لب حوض, meaning by the pond) Ensemble (1568–1622) is the name of the area surrounding one of the few remaining hauz, or pond, in the city of Bukhara. Several such ponds existed in Bukhara prior to Soviet rule. The ponds acted as the city's principal source of water, but were also notorious for spreading disease, and thus were mostly filled in during the 1920s and 1930s by the Soviets. The Lab-i Hauz survived owing to its role as the centerpiece of an architectural ensemble dating back to the 16th to 17th centuries. The Lab-i Hauz ensemble consists of the 16th-century Kukeldash Madrasah, the largest in the city, along the north side of the pond. On the eastern and western sides of the pond are a 17th-century lodging-house for itinerant Sufis, and a 17th-century madrasah. There is also a metal sculpture of Nasruddin Hodja, the quick-witted and warm-hearted man, who forms the central character of many children's folk stories in Central Asian, Afghanistan, and Pakistan, sitting atop his mule with one hand on his heart and the other with an 'All OK' sign above his head.

    Bahoutdin Architectural Complex:
    is a necropolis commemorating Shaykh Baha-ud-Din or Bohoutdin, the founder of Naqshbandi order. The complex includes the dahma (gravestone) of Bahoutdin, Khakim Kushbegi mosque, Muzaffarkan mosque, and Abdul-Lazizkhan khanqah. The site is listed on the UNESCO World Heritage Site tentative list on January 18, 2008.

    Editiert am 25.03.2019
    Text von Wolfgang
    ÖFFENTLICH
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  • Day119

    Bukhara

    September 9, 2018 in Uzbekistan ⋅ ☀️ 29 °C

    Today we will have a guided tour of Bukhara and the surrounding area, including the Ismail Samani Mausoleum, Kalon Mosque, Zindon Prison and the Ark Fortress. On our second day here, we will have a free day to further explore this incredible historic city and its surroundings. Included Activities: Explore the city's oldest Islamic monument, the 10th-century mausoleum of Ismail Samanid, the founder of the Samanid Dynasty (Included in Kitty). Discover the ruins of the ancient 5th-century fortress of the Bukhara Ark (Included in Kitty). Explore the colossal Kalon Mosque and Minaret, which has survived without restoration for 850 years and impressed Genghis Khan so much that he ordered the building to be spared (Included in Kitty). Visit the magnificent 16th-centrury architectural ensemble surrounding the Lyab-i Hauz ponds, once the city's principal source of water (Included in Kitty). Optional Activities: See the Indian-style Char Minar Minarets, four towers nestled in a maze of alleyways in downtown Bukhara (Free).
    Wir besuchen morgens das „Samani Mausoleum”. Danach haben wir uns das Erstellen von „Cupper Carving” in einer Freiluftwerstatt angesehen und besuchen das „Museum of the Bukhara Water Supply”, sowie die Mosque „Bolo-khaus”. Gegen Mittag besuchen wir das „Ark Fortress”. Nachmittags das „Minaret Kalyan” with „Medrese Miri Arab” und die „Kalon Mosque”.

    Wikipedia:
    Bukhara was the last capital of the Emirate of Bukhara and was besieged by the Red Army during the Russian Civil War. During the Bukhara operation of 1920, an army of well-disciplined and well equipped Red Army troops under the command of Bolshevik general Mikhail Frunze attacked the city of Bukhara. On 31 August 1920, the Emir Alim Khan fled to Dushanbe in Eastern Bukhara (later he escaped from Dushanbe to Kabul in Afghanistan). On 2 September 1920, after four days of fighting, the emir's citadel (the Ark) was destroyed, the red flag was raised from the top of Kalyan Minaret. On 14 September 1920, the All-Bukharan Revolutionary Committee was set up, headed by A. Mukhitdinov. The government—the Council of People's Nazirs (see nāẓir)—was presided over by Faizullah Khojaev. The Bukharan People's Soviet Republic existed from 1920 to 1925 when the city was integrated into the Uzbek Soviet Socialist Republic. Fitzroy Maclean, then a young diplomat in the British Embassy in Moscow, made a surreptitious visit to Bokhara in 1938, sight-seeing and sleeping in parks. In his memoir Eastern Approaches, he judged it an "enchanted city" with buildings that rivalled "the finest architecture of the Italian Renaissance". In the latter half of the 20th century, the war in Afghanistan and civil war in Tajikistan brought Dari- and Tajik-speaking refugees into Bukhara and Samarkand. After integrating themselves into the local Tajik population, these cities face a movement for annexation into Tajikistan with which the cities have no common border.

    Editiert am 01.05.2019
    Text von Wolfgang
    ÖFFENTLICH
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You might also know this place by the following names:

Bukhara Province, Bukhara, Бухара, Buxoro

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