Gibraltar
Gibraltar

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60 travelers at this place:

  • Day15

    Gibraltar

    July 12 in Gibraltar

    We drove from Ronda to Gibraltar this morning. It is a two hour drive through a mountainous region of the most spectacular countryside. Southern Spain in rugged and grand. As we descended from the mountains towards the Mediterranean Sea, we passed many luxury resorts in the hinterland with fantastic views of the famous coastline.

    We parked the car in La Linea and walked through customs into Gibraltar. The small region of Gibraltar is still English territory and has been since 1770. The strategic location is a key to controlling the maritime trade in the Mediterranean Sea. Half the worlds maritime trade passes through the narrow straight of Gibraltar, which is only 8 miles across (14km). One can clearly see Africa from Gibraltar and vice versa.

    The famous rock of Gibraltar took me by surprise. I was not expecting something so huge. It is a monster which just rises out of nowhere. It is a memorable landmark in an amazing location. It has seen a huge amount of history. Many naval fleets have passed by and some have even attacked the ruling power in Gibraltar, from Roman times right up to WW2. Hitler hatched a plan to take Gibraltar from the Brits but it failed. It was code named Operation Felix.

    We had lunch at McDonald’s near Gibraltar and were amused that the drive through was called McAuto.
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  • Day45

    Gibraltar

    June 22 in Gibraltar

    Heute sind wir in das dritt kleinste Land der Welt gefahren - Gibraltar. Wir haben noch in Spanien geparkt und sind dann zu Fuß über die Grenze. Es geht über die Flugzeug Start-und Landebahn. Diese wurde aus Platzmangel ins Wasser gebaut und ist sozusagen die Grenze zu Spanien. Sobald man über die Grenze kommt sieht man rote Telefonzellen, Schüler in Uniform und alle sprechen Englisch. Nachdem wir von tausend Taxifahrern angesprochen wurden, ob sie uns auf den Berg fahren sollen (für 30€ pro Person), haben wir dennoch entschieden zu Fuß zugehen. Man hätte aber auch mit der Seilbahn fahren können. Nach vielen Stufen haben wir es bis auf den "Upper Rock" geschafft. Hier gibt es Affen. Die Affen sind wohl irgendwann aus Afrika nach Gibraltar gekommen und haben sich dort angesiedelt. Als Moritz sich neben einen Affen setzten wollte um ein Foto zu machen, kam plötzlich ein anderer angerannt und hat versucht den Reißverschluss vom Rucksack aufzumachen. Wahnsinnig schlaue Tiere. Wir hatten zum Glück Sonnenbrille und Cappis verstaut, diese Sachen sind sonst schnell weg.
    Ein tolles Erlebnis.
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  • Day7

    Gibraltar - On top of the Rock

    June 11 in Gibraltar

    After our airport experience we walked through the city and up the rock. There we found a suspension bridge, monkeys and really great views to Africa. After our walk we enjoyed a great Fish and chips snack in downtown Gibraltar before we went back to Spain. All in all a great day!

    Nach unsere Flughafen Erfahrung sind wir durch die Innenstadt und auf den Felsen gewandert. Von dort hatten wir einen super Blick auf Gibraltar, Afrika und die spanische Küste, haben Affen gesehen und eine Hängebrücke überquert. Nach der Wanderung gab es dann noch eine Portion Fish & Chips bevor es zurück nach Spanien ging. Zusammenfassend: Ein super Tag mit ein bisschen Sonnenbrand!Read more

  • Day638

    Britain for the day (Gibraltar)

    March 26 in Gibraltar

    The sun was shining and we were going on a day visit to Britain; Gibraltar to be precise! We made fast progress along the urban corridor that inhabited this stretch of Spain's southern shore. Doing the rat run along the dual carriageway, interspersed frequently by glorietas (roundabouts) we passed by luxury apartments clustered together in white and peach, palms and sculpted citrus trees and signs for Costa del Golf.

    The distinctive landmass grew larger each time we glimpsed it and we started to see GBZ number plates. Approaching the low flat land linking Gibraltar to Spain, we were funneled into lanes leading to the border. It was slow going but we waited in line with other visitors and Gibraltarians. When at a standstill we watched the driver ahead of us passing money to a man wearing a high-vis vest. By the time he reached our window Vicky had removed the passport wallet and her phone from the dashboard. 'You going to Gibraltar? You drive?' he asked. 'Yes' we replied, '20 Euros', 'What!?!' At our incredulous response (and possibly the sight of the dashcam filming him) the chancer made a hasty retreat, on to the next naive looking visitor! After crawling by two people begging with boards written in English we drove across the flat expanse of Gibraltar airport's runways and on to passport control. Lanes for vehicles with and without customs formalities merged into one; what a nightmare it must be for residents on the daily commute! Passports checked, we were pulled over and asked about the van's height and about the canoe. 'Is it for personal use? Are you just coming for the day? No engine?' They spoke to us in acceneted English and were keen to convey that camping was not allowed anywhere in Gibraltar, but did so in a friendly manner, telling us we could park anywhere and wishing us a good visit.

    As we drove around the narrow, shore hugging road, there was a high concentration of houses. All signs were written in English, although speed limits were still in kmph not mph and we were driving on the right. Another reminder of home came as we entered the Dudley Ward Way tunnel. It was two way but its low sides required us to drive in the middle, so we were thankfull it wasn't busy.

    It was easy to find a spot in the large car park at Europa Point and easy to catch the number 2 bus into Gibraltar city. Prices were displayed in both pounds and euros but we'd decided to have a 'British Day' so excitedly paid in the former. Will even got an over 60's discount! Now that we were formally in Britain, we weren't rankled by hearing English spoken and seeing it written, as we had been in Malága. Walking through town Vicky got a little over enthusiastic, snapping photos of red post boxes, British looking litter bins, Union Flags advertising today's British newspapers and British fish and chips. We chose The Royal Calpe pub for ours, washed down with a pint (yes, pint) of London Pride. All these things may seem very trivial and normal to those reading back in the UK, but having spent so much time away over the last 21 months, to have so many things that remind us of home, so far from England, was a novelty we enjoyed for the day. We'd probably have quite a different point of view if we were visiting as part of a 1 week holiday.

    After spending a little time pointing out highstreet shops such as Marks and Spencers, Debenhams, Early Learning Centre and Specsavers, we dodged the taxi drivers offering us lifts and took the cable car to the top station (there was no way we could have climbed up after those fish and chips!). The lift operator was friendly, pointing out the Spanish enclave in Africa as we rose up the steep hill to 412m and into the nature reserve. He explained that out of the 300 wild Barbary Macaques who occupy the upper rock, some could be cheeky, riding on taxis and hanging out in the busier tourist spots in hope of being fed, despite the authorities providing enough food for them everyday.

    Exiting the cable car into the Upper Rock Nature Reserve, we encountered these cheeky monkeys almost straight away. It was captivating to see them at such close quarters and reassuring that they appeared relaxed around us. Many were sedentary, sitting quietly on a wall or the road (Vicky nearly tripped over one she hadn't noticed!). Others were more interested in preening one another and the babies enjoyed wrestling and plucking bunches of yellow wood sorrel for a munch. We'd been told not to touch them and respected this, but looked on disapprovingly as other tourists made grabs for the babies as they posed for a photo.

    When we did manage to peal our eyes away from these amazing primates, the views were stunning. Below us the city hugged the lowland bordering the Straights of Gibraltar. Mainland Spain was on one side and Africa seemed so close on the other! It was exciting to see, but even more thrilling to think that we planned to be over there in Morocco in Martha Motorhome in two year's time!

    Huge steel cargo ships coalesced at the pinch point where the Atlantic met the Mediterranean, some of them moored, others set on their course. Consulting the map we began to make our way towards the Sky Walk; a glass platform erected on the far side of the steep cliff. Standing on it, we could see the ground falling away under our feet to the intensely azure sea 400m below. It was a good experience but busy, so we continued along a quieter path which afforded us views back over the jagged ridge of Gibraltar Rock. From then onwards there were few people, although we were occasionally passed by taxis that clustered around attractions such as St Michael's Cave and the Ape's Den half way down.

    The day was hot and we were keen to get back to Poppy, but the descent seemed to take a long time, especially so because of the poor signage. Reaching the city we soon found a bus stop for the number 2 and were on our way. It was interesting listening to the local Llanito being spoken. A mix of English, Spanish Genoese and some Portuguese, people would flip between this and pure English or Spanish.

    Thanks to the way we'd ventilated the van and raised its reflective blinds it had remained comfortable for Poppy and Vicky took her out while Will bought ice creams from the seller parked nearby. To end our time in Gibraltar we spent 20 minutes looking out at views of Africa and Spain from the (very windy) viewpoints at Europa Point.

    As we drove back through the tunnel and over the airstrip we reflected on what a good day we'd had in Gibraltar. It had been a little busy, but we'd enjoyed the novelty of spending our pounds, eating fish and chips and drinking a British pint. The Barbery Macaques had been spellbinding and the views of the rock itself and of the intercontinental straights were incredible.
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  • Day198

    The Rock

    October 30, 2017 in Gibraltar

    Spent today with an old friend from Guernsey, Dave Bruce, and he have us a personalised guided walking tour of the Rock. We walked to the Moorish castle, Siege tunnels, Windsor bridge, Jews gate, Mediterranean steps, and St Michaels Cave. It was a great way to see the island and to learn a lot more about it as well as working up a decent sweat climbing the steps. We are now planning on riding the cable car to the top tomorrow and visiting the cave and tunnels on the way back down. Here are pictures of the stunning views and of the famous monkeys. Will hopefully get some more photos to show you. We took a cycle ride around the edgeish yesterday, I say ish because in some cases you are actually in the Rock rather than on the edge as you have to pass through three different tunnels, we passed some of the less touristy sites as well including the crematorium tip and the scrapyard. A lot of the current Rock is actually reclaimed land you might be able to see the old walls in some of the pictures and anything outside of these is on reclaimed land. Most of the lowlying land to the North and West is reclaimed only the old docks used to be there.Read more

  • Day199

    More Rock

    October 31, 2017 in Gibraltar

    So today after buying some new batteries for the boat, and I'm not talking Duracell, we were tourists and took the cable car up the Rock then visited O'Haras battery, St Michaels Cave, Siege tunnels, Siege museum and Moorish castle before john had to have a Guinness and we wondered back to the boat. So here are some more photos both of the views and the monkeys

  • Day95

    Gibraltar

    November 5, 2017 in Gibraltar

    Vorgester simr in Gibraltar acho. Schono lustig wiemä i wenigä Meter vo Spaniä uf Ängland chunnt...
    Z' Gibraltar heimr üs uf d' Suechi gmacht nachemä Steuplatz, wos schiins hie am Hafä git. Leider heimr dä nienä gfungä. So simr bis zum "Europa Point" cho, dsch sonä üsserstä Zipfu vo Gibraltar u dert isch ä Lüchtturm, ä Moschee u ä Kanonä. Dr Lüchtturm het mega guet usgseh mit sim rot-wissä Chleid im blau-grau vom Himmu – dramatischä u majestätischä Aablick! Ufdr angerä Sitä vom Platz isch ganz chöniglich d' Moschee gstangä. Äs prächtigs Geböide!
    Nach däm mir ds aues hei agluegt, simr abä it Autstadt. Dert simr grad us ersts it Info u när dür d' Strassä gschlenderet. Krass, wie zmitts in Spaniä äs Mini-Ängland mitemä chliinä London cha bestah. D' Lüt redä aui änglisch, mä zauht mit Pounds (odr Euros) und i praktisch aunä Restaurants chamä Fish&Chips ha. Nur dr Vrcheer isch normau; sie fahrä o rächts.
    Wüumr dä Steuplatz geng no nienä hei gfungä, heimr üs entschidä, bi däm "Europa Point" ufem Parkplatz gah z' nächtigä. Währendem Znacht hets du plötzlech afah tropfä u Blitzä hei dr Himmu lah erhäuä. No heimrs gschafft aues inä z' ruumä, da hets scho aagfangä schiffä. Üsä erst Rägä sit ämnä Zitli! Mir hei üs de schnäu i Alj vrchrochä u hei no ä Fium gluegt.
    Gester heimr eich vorgha, früeh ufzstah fr ufä Bärg ufä. Z' Weckerlütä isch aber vomnä Platzrägä begleitet gsi u so heimr spontan entschidä, nomau ä Rundi witrzschlafä. So het üsä Tag när o usgseh. Nachdäm d' Sunnä dür d' Wulchä het mögä, simr losgfahrä. Abr chuum im Alj, hets widr afah schiffä. Bir Gondelistation heisi üs när o gseit, dass d' Gondeli momentan nid fahrä u so heimr üs entschidä, usserhaub ufnä Camping z' gah u dr Usflug ufä Bärg z' vrschiebä. Womr dr Camping hei gfungä u üs hei iigrichtet, heimr ä Fium im Alj-Chino gnossä u hei üs ä gmüetlechä Tag gmacht. Z' Wätter isch o widr schön gsi, abr nid so sichr. Drum simr bim Entschluss blibe, dr Usflug z' verschiebä. Am Aabä heimr CousCous à la Dana gmacht, hei nomau ä Fium gluegt u si gah schlafä.
    So, itz hüt hets klappet. Mit Sunneschiin simr erwachet u dä hetsech dr ganz Tag mögä ha.
    In the morning we met our camping-neighbours, Marie and Henning. They're norwegian people and nearly the same age as we are. After a long time of talking, we went to Gibraltar together.
    In Gibraltar we went up to the hill called "upper rock" with de cable car. On the hill it was a very nice view! We saw to Gibraltar, to Ceuta (Africa), to the Straight of Gibraltar and to Spain. Amazing and very stunning!
    As we went out of the cable car, we saw the first apes. Such cute animals! We made a roundcourse about 4km long and then went downhill with the cable car. After a good lunch with our new friends we said goodbye.
    Next stop: Málaga
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  • Day54

    Gibraltar, Gibraltar

    August 1 in Gibraltar

    Got off quickly this morning with Jackson. We stopped by a small supermarket to pick up snacks for the cabin and then went to the Red Lion again for a breakfast of omelettes. We remembered it from last time because of the great omelettes and wifi. After that I had to head back to the ship for a shoot with some of the strictly guys. Jackson headed to pick up his sun glasses that he forgot last time we were here.Read more

  • Day196

    Gibraltar

    October 28, 2017 in Gibraltar

    So we are now on the Rock, after leaving Rota we travelled 40 miles to Barbate for the night then 40 miles to Gibraltar on both days it started well then the wind picked up and was on the nose, but good news I wasn't actually ill although I did feel a bit rough. The scenery travelling from Barbate to Gibraltar was more interesting than it's been for a while, there are hills now it's been fairly flat since Albufeira, and we could be much closer in as no longer shoals within 2 miles of the shore. This is the first time we have had to moor up Mediterranean style and it was a lot less painful than we expected even going in stern too, we didn't hit anything which surprised us, but getting a new bow thruster should make this manoeuvre easier. We have had a quick wander around Main Street and saw an M&S, Debenhams, Mothercare and Morrisons as well as some typical pub names The Rock Arms, O'Reillys etc. We will be proper tourists tomorrow but don't worry we will be careful of the monkeys.

    Photo 1 is just the scenery/coast between Barbate and Gibraltar
    Photo 2 shows the Atlas Mountains poking their head above the clouds just off the bow of the boat
    Photo 3 is of the lighthouse on Tarifa a place that we have read has the highest suicide rate in Europe and apparently 360 out of 365 days of high winds, it was certainly blowing when we went past, the African coast was only about 8 miles away.
    Photo 4 is of scenery and what looked to us like a Martello tower.
    Photo 5 is of a tanker and the African coast
    Photo 6 is the Rock not the best angle but while we were coming across the bay it was covered in cloud and didn't clear until we had fueled up at a cost of 45.9 pence a litre, John was pleased with that price.
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  • Day18

    Day 18: Gibraltar

    March 5, 2017 in Gibraltar

    Decided to take my destiny into my own hands today and get out of the house. One place I'd always been curious to see was Gibraltar, and now that it wasn't too far away, I decided I'd drive down and take a look. Shandos investigated the options and decided she wasn't interested, and would stay behind to mind the animals. So I got up fairly early, breakfasted and showered and hit the road just after 9am.

    It was about a 2.5 hour drive from Lucena down to Gibraltar, and was freeway the entire way aside from maybe the last 5 kilometres. A few tolls which was annoying (and unexpected), since I was just following Google's directions! Arrived in the Spanish border town of La Linea de la Conception about 11:15 and parked the car in a large carpark a few hundred metres from the border. I'd read that your best option for a day trip is to park on the Spanish side and walk over, as the queue for cars crossing was usually quite slow (it looked slow this morning!), and parking is both scarce and expensive in Gibraltar.

    But with my UK passport I walked straight through with no lines, and only the most perfunctory of passport checks. The next part was quite exciting, as the main runway of Gibraltar airport directly bisects the main road into and out of the town. So I had to walk across! Thankfully it's not a busy airport, with only around 6 aircraft movements each day. Just as I finished crossing the bells started ringing and the gates came down. I got excited thinking I'd see a plane come in, but it was a false alarm as almost immediately afterwards the bells rang again and the gates went up.

    I headed into town, on foot rather than forking out several pounds for a bus. The old town is very English, with the building styles and trimmings all very reminiscent of the home country. Plus all the signs were in English and the brands were all English (Marks & Spencer, Natwest etc). Lots of nationalist slogans around which surprised me a bit - "Gibraltan and proud, British like the pound" and so on. Very fiercely pro-British, though I guess it should be expected given both referendums (1967 and I think in the 90s?) returned a "stay in the UK" result.

    Unfortunately all of the shops were closed since it was Sunday, so I had to content myself with window shopping instead. Still very un-used to that aspect of European life. But the upside was that all the pubs (which were of course open) had Sunday roasts available, so I picked out a nice looking place and ordered, only to discover the Sunday roast wasn't ready until 1pm! You can take the territory out of Spain, but...

    I had English fish & chips instead - I didn't want to waste 45 minutes waiting for the kitchen, as I had a Rock to climb!

    But I wasn't walking up, there's a cable car that takes you to the almost-summit. Seen in profile, the Rock actually has three summits, two about the same height at the northern and southern ends (412 metres), and a slightly lower one in the middle, which is where the cable car dropped us off. Great views during the climb - the mountains of Africa in one direction, Spain and the Costa del Sol in the other, and the UK underneath us. The weather wasn't quite co-operating; more high cloud causing washed-out photos, but it was clear further out so I kept up hope!

    Had a good look around from the observatory on the central summit - you actually can't go to the higher two as they're still active military installations, complete with radar domes, antennae and razor wire. Loads of monkeys around as well, which Gibraltar is famous for. Not sure exactly what type of macaque they are, but they were tail-less so very different to the ones we were used to in Asia.

    I hate monkeys. They're fairly aggressive, and snatch at bags and dive into pockets. I even saw a few people get jumped on, though they weren't hurt or anything. They're very quick to bare their teeth, and I'm always worried about being bitten and getting hepatitis or something. A few cute little baby ones around, but I generally steered clear.

    I wanted to check out some of the older military installations still visible on the Rock so I did some bushwalking - it's actually an enormous area. After a long and arduous climb I made it up to O'Hara's Battery, where the 9.2" guns faced out to the Mediterranean Sea. Unfortunately for me it was closed! But I managed to do some scrambling nearby and found my way to just under the military installation at the southern summit which had a great view. And unlike the cable car area, I had this all to myself - until a couple of British expats arrived with their dogs, having walked the entire way up!

    I started wandering back down towards the cable car station, stopping off at St Michael's Cave on the way. The Rock is chock-full of caves, tunnels, supply trains and hidden bunkers, both man-made and natural, though obviously many are still off-limits to the public. I was interested in checking out the caves, but it was 10 pounds for entry so I politely declined!

    Back to the cable car station and by now it was getting late in the afternoon and I had a long walk and drive ahead of me, so I bought a Coke, had one last look around and then descended. Long walk back through town, across the runway, across the border, then back to the car around 4pm. And off I went, back down the freeway from whence I came! One last look back to see the Rock bathed in sunshine - naturally!

    Two and a bit hours drive back was uneventful, though a bit rainy in places as I went through mountains. Southern Spain is surprisingly rugged, much more than I expected. Shandos had done a bit of cleaning in my absence but not much else! Dogs all happy to see me of course.

    Had a great day and I'm glad that I went. It's a strange place; not too touristed but I guess it's the winter months. Probably 75% of the tourists were Brits, and most of the rest were Spanish. The old town area is nice, but outside of that it's mostly grim apartment buildings on reclaimed land which reminded me a lot of Hong Kong. Not somewhere I'd want to live I don't think!
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You might also know this place by the following names:

Gibraltar, Gyebralta, ጊብራልታር, Chibraltar, Calpis, جبل طارق, جيبرالتار, Xibraltar, Гібралтар, Гибралтар, Zibralitari, জিব্রাল্টার, ཇིབ་རཱལ་ཊར།, জিব্রালটার, Jibraltar, ޖަބަލްޠާރިޤު, Gibraltar nutome, Γιβραλτάρ, Ĝibraltaro, گیبرالتار, Jibraltaar, Giobráltar, Giobraltair, જીબ્રાલ્ટર, Gibraaltar, Jibaraltar, גיברלטר, जिब्राल्टर, Gibraltár, Ջիբրալթար, Gíbraltar, Gibilterra, ジブラルタル, ჰიბრალტარი, Jibralta, ಗಿಬ್ರಾಲ್ಟರ್, 지브롤터, Calpe, Giburalita, Gibiltæra, Gibiltera, Zibatalɛ, Gibraltaras, Jibeletale, Gibraltārs, Zibraltara, Kāmaka, ജിബ്രാള്‍ട്ടര്‍, ဂျီဘရော်လ်တာ, जिब्राल्टार, Dgibrâltar, Gibartar, ଜିବ୍ରାଲ୍ଟର୍, Jibrulta, Gibiltèra, جبرالٹر, Juburalitari, Giburalitari, Gibbilterra, Zibraltära, Zibaratära, ජිබ්‍රෝල්ටාව, Gjibraltari, ஜிப்ரால்டர், జిబ్రాల్టార్, ยิบรอลตาร์, Hibraltar, Sipalālitā, Cebelitarık, جبل الطارق, Djibraltar, 直布罗陀, Гибралта Балһсн, גיבראלטאר, Orílẹ́ède Gibaratara, 直布羅陀, i-Gibraltar

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