Uganda
Uganda

Curious what backpackers do in Uganda? Discover travel destinations all over the world of travelers writing a travel blog on FindPenguins.

26 travelers at this place:

  • Day1

    Kayunga

    January 4 in Uganda

    AFRICA NATURAL TOURS AND SAFARI
    Our packages involve Mount Kilimanjaro, Mount Kenya and Mount Meru, Wildlife Safari such as Serengeti and Ngorongoro Crater, Culture tourism such as Masai and beach holiday such as Zanzibar. I am Godfrey Ngaiza (managing director).
    Welcome to Africa, welcome to Tanzania
    Contacts with Us: Africa Natural Tours
    Blog africanaturaltours.blogspot.com
    Websitewww.africanaturaltours.com
    Face book page facebook.com/afrotours/
    Instagram https://www.instagram.com/africa_natural_tours/
    Twitter twitter.com/africanatural01
    Email info@africanaturaltours.com
    Google+ plus.google.com/u/1/collection/IQLjTE
    What app Number +255 653 679 958
    Read more

  • Day1

    Bulisa

    January 4 in Uganda

    AFRICA NATURAL TOURS AND SAFARI
    Our packages involve Mount Kilimanjaro, Mount Kenya and Mount Meru, Wildlife Safari such as Serengeti and Ngorongoro Crater, Culture tourism such as Masai and beach holiday such as Zanzibar. I am Godfrey Ngaiza (managing director).
    Welcome to Africa, welcome to Tanzania
    Contacts with Us: Africa Natural Tours
    Blog africanaturaltours.blogspot.com
    Websitewww.africanaturaltours.com
    Face book page facebook.com/afrotours/
    Instagram https://www.instagram.com/africa_natural_tours/
    Twitter twitter.com/africanatural01
    Email info@africanaturaltours.com
    Google+ plus.google.com/u/1/collection/IQLjTE
    What app Number +255 653 679 958
    Read more

  • Day114

    Ruhija, Bwindi Impenetrable Forest NP

    August 27, 2017 in Uganda

    We were sure that nothing could be better than our gorilla experience in Rwanda – we were wrong! Seeing the gorillas for the second time in Bwindi Impenetrable Forest in Uganda (BEST name for a park, ever) was even more incredible…we feel beyond lucky.
    The weather was clear and it was a short hike to where the gorilla family we were tracking had decided to hang out for the day. It took the forward trackers some time to find them as they kept changing direction and we had to wait for about an hour before they knew for sure where they were settling in for breakfast. Again, like Rwanda, we knew we were close when the forward trackers appeared out of the dense undergrowth and our guide told us to leave everything with a couple of the porters, except cameras.
    We approached the family, with a female and young baby appearing first. Next, the massive alpha silverback appeared and sat on the edge of a small clearing. This silverback was huge, but calm, which somehow made him more imposing than the silverbacks we encountered in Rwanda. The group was made up of 3 silverbacks (2 did not appear as they are older and tend hang out on the outskirts of the group), several females and juveniles, and a few little ones -including a 6-month old. Slowly, most of the group appeared in the small clearing and started to feed, climb and play fight. The silverback quietly sat in the background observing and occasionally trying to nap, but also making periodic, low pitched rumbles to make sure we knew he was there and to communicate with the family. From the photos and video you get a sense of how close we got to the gorillas. Officially, you are supposed to only get within 7 meters of them, but it is impossible to maintain that distance because of the tight, dense undergrowth, but also because the gorillas often approach you, sometimes quickly, and decide to sit and do their thing just a few feet from you. After a quick hour, we started to reluctantly retreat back up the mountain and leave the gorillas behind.
    No one leaves this experience unhappy. When you are with the gorillas you occasionally look around at your fellow trekkers to observe their reactions and everyone has smiles, sometimes tears. What we also noticed with this encounter was the reaction of the porters, guide, trackers and researcher that was present. They were as excited as the paying guests even though they probably see gorillas most days. They were all taking pictures, laughing at the young gorilla antics and talking excitedly with each other about the behavior. What an amazing job!!
    When we returned from trekking, we were told by our guide that a chameleon had been located in the nearby village (we’d mentioned wanting to see one), so off we went in our LR with one of the porters to see a chameleon. We climbed through the village into a back garden and were able to see 3 (a male, female and young one) in a tree. What an incredible day!
    Read more

  • Day112

    Rushaga, Bwindi Inpenetrable NP

    August 25, 2017 in Uganda

    We made a quick stop in Kabale to use the ATM and buy some more wine and bread, before driving a short distance to the edge of the forest. We have permits to go gorilla trekking in a few days, but thought we’d spend a few nights on one side of the park, then backtrack to the other side where our gorilla trek begins.
    We turned off the paved road onto a steep and windy dirt road for the 20km drive to our lodge. Almost immediately, the afternoon downpour started and the road turned into a slippery river. At several spots, the torrential rains had washed large rocks onto the road and we (John) had to get out to clear some of them, with the help of local villagers, in order to get through. At one stage we thought about turning around, but decided to carry on, check into a dry room, and hang out until the rain let up. The location of the lodge was great and we spent a few hours sitting out on the verandah, with drink in hand, watching the mist roll in and out of the valleys of the rain forest in front of us.
    We've had a few interesting experiences here.
    First, we found ourselves in bed bundled up under several warm blankets at 7:30 pm, drinking boxed-red wine from our plastic glasses, listening to an NPR podcast (radio show for non-US readers). We had a good laugh about whether this was a preview of our twilight years.
    Another interesting moment happened as soon as we turned out the light. We both felt something hit the middle of the bed – something with weight. John kicked whatever it was and we both are sure we heard it hit the wall on the other side of the room. We turned on the light, but could not find anything. A very restless night of sleep followed with our thinking every noise was some 4-legged rodent, big six-legged bug, 100-legged centipede or legless snake creeping up to get us. We are in the middle of a rainforest and nature can easily get into the rustic cabins, huts, and what not. However, we opted to spend our second night in our tent, which felt much safer and better sealed. Rain be damned!!
    Read more

  • Day1

    Jinja

    July 5, 2017 in Uganda

    Been a busy couple of nights with James on cooking duty, buying and cooking dinner, breakfast and lunch with two others followed by Louisa doing dinner and breakfast with a different cook crew. It was a quite a challenge with 20 meat eaters, 5 vegetarians, a small budget, three coal burners to cook it on as well as the hot water for washing up! We crossed the border yesterday and instantly noticed the difference as it looks quite tropical with fruit trees, rice paddies and many mud round houses in the rural areas. We have had quite a few storms as the wet season has come late (it's now the dry season). We are having a couple of nights on the banks of the River Nile, supposedly the source as it flows out of Lake Victoria. This morning, before the storm, we used a cut out kayak to slide down a ramp that launched us 10 foot in the air! Whilst travelling along we get so many waves from everyone along with massive smiles - such a great reception.Read more

  • Day4

    Lake Bunyonyi

    July 8, 2017 in Uganda

    We went to the the most beautiful lake in Uganda for the day, the main reason was to spend time at an orphanage on one of the 29 islands. The surrounding hillsides are intensively terraced, similar in many ways to Nepal. We spent a couple of hours dancing and singing with many of the 149 children from the day care orphanage. After a beautiful walk across the island we had a swim in the lake, jumping from a rather high platform that could only be reached by climbing up the tree.Read more

  • Day53

    Red beans and a pickup truck

    February 22, 2016 in Uganda

    Considering my excitement for the chimps themselves, I didn't elaborate on how this all came about. We knew that Kibale National Park was the place for chimp tracking. We also knew it was expensive. It's 150$ for the permit, entrance fee to the park, and they supply the guide. So kind of a package deal for chimp tracking. There's other parks in the country who offer "primate walks" for about 60-70$ on which you have roughly a 30% chance of seeing chimps. Jack and I discussed and decided I would be way too disappointed if I was to try another park and not see chimps, so we decided to bite the bullet and go big! A lot of tour companies offer something with the chimp tracking and crater lakes in a day, but those tours were 550$US for the two of us. One company did offer this crater lakes and chimp tour to us for 390$US, but that basically means you're paying 90$ for transportation there and around the lakes. We decided to do the crater lakes ourselves.

    We took a boda-boda (motorcycle taxi) out to where we thought we needed to go buy the tracking permit. This was at 630am, because since I'm a nervous wreck about making sure this happens and I'm convinced something will go wrong, I wanted to be at the park office as soon as it opened at 730am to reserve for the next morning. That's right, we were planning on doing the hike the next day, but I was determined to make it there before yesterday's group started, in case it was full today or something and I had to go another time. Who knows.

    The boda ride is an hour long in red dirt roads with speed bumps and potholes. We were covered, along with our bags, in a full layer of red dust once we arrived at the park's head office, only to be told the permits are sold at the headquarters, not the office, 10km back up the same road. I panicked. What if someone had woken up just as early and was at the right place just in time to buy out all the permits? Exhausted from the bike ride, we decided to go check in to our hotel before going back to the headquarters with this boda-boda.

    We chose the Primate Safari Lodge simply because it was the only lodge walking distance to the head office, which is where the chimp tracking walk starts from. It's actually right next door, but there isn't another option close enough to walk from. And of course, the idea of missing the hike simply because of ill planned transportation would make me cry.

    Turns out, the lodge was 14$US per PERSON to camp, not per tent like we thought. Picture this : super nice, fancy lodge, advertising private cottages with stone showers and hers and hers bathrobes, and a "full board" option or meals of 19$US each... EACH. That's more then our camp site price. And here we are, two girls hanging up a hammock tent under the not so well kept shelter because we don't have a rain cover. Granted, why would they upkeep their camp ground site, I don't think they've ever had campers... They didn't really know what to do with us. Of course we attempted to argue the price, but we weren't getting anywhere. So we made sure to get our 28 dollars' worth. Keep in mind - this is the most we've ever paid for a room in Uganda, and this wasn't a room! This was simply the permission to put our tent up. Getting back from our crater lakes walk yesterday, they let us use the empty room's shower. The cottage was gorgeous! I didn't want to leave. Part of me was angry we were sleeping two girls in one hammock when this cottage was going to be empty!

    Having seen the prices of the meals in the morning when we dropped our bags off, we knew groceries needed to be done. So after "checking into" our hotel (dropping our bags off in the office), our lovely boda-boda driver took us to the headquarters to buy our park permits which acted as reservations. The man must not have known about my anxiety, because we expressed what we want, 2 permits for tomorrow morning, and he looks down at his computer and starts typing... Something... And not saying anything... A good 5 minutes of torture later I break the silence and ask "is there still permits available? Are we good for tomorrow?" to which he replies ever so casually "oh yes yes, that's OK long time ago". Damn him! Making me sweat! So it's confirmed! I hike tomorrow! (well today).

    All that to say we managed to do it on our own! Insert blog from yesterday - we walked the lakes on our own. Then boda back to the Primate Lodge before dark to set up our luxurious accommodation for the night. I've never drank so many hot drinks in my life! Like I said, we wanted our 28 dollars worth... And hot drinks were included, buffet style. That night, I had a hot chocolate (my first since I've left) and 2 teas. Today, I had 2 coffees and 3 teas. Why not! We had bought a bunch of fruit and mini breads from the little towns along the lake, so we got them to supply us with bowls and cutlery to make a fruit salad. We bought Rolex from the town to have for diner (eggs rolled into chapati). We didn't order a thing from them for the 3 meals we were there, and I was never hungry! This wonderful American older couple took pitty on us I guess, they bought us lunch today! Never say no to free. They wanted to buy us each lunch, but the kitchen prepares the food ahead of time, so they only had the one plate, so we shared. Super appreciated.

    It was clear that the people who stay in this lodge have money. Most of them had their own guide following them in the country. Mostly an older crowd. I guess with the price of the permits, not very many backpackers do this... After our briefing at the park office, our chimp tracking guide goes "OK, everybody in your vehicles and we meet you at the trial". Jack and I look at her and respond "what vehicles?" so the lovely American couple who had their own guide for a week gave us a ride... Apparently tours are a big thing here... Lol.

    All that to say, we did it! We relaxed at the lodge after returning around 1130am (left at 8am), and hung up the hammock in the front lawn for Jack to read from. I don't think they've ever had guest quite like us, they didn't really know what to do with us... I asked to lay my clothes on a chair to dry, and they offered to put it in the dryer for me. I didn't think dryers existed here... We asked for a knife, they would bring a whole place setting. We made our way back to town today riding in the back of a pickup truck full of bags of red beans... Covered in dirt again on arrival. Jack was facing forward so had the outline of her sunglasses marked in dirt. Sexy.

    I get to sleep in a bed tonight. I don't have to calculate if my hip bone is digging into Jack's leg, or if I want to move my leg I have to ask Jack to roll over, or contemplating if it's really that important for me to have sensation and circulation in my right leg since I'll wake Jack up if I move... Two people in a hammock is not recommended... FYI.
    Read more

  • Day61

    Top Minibus ride

    March 1, 2016 in Uganda

    We've been taking minibuses (aka matatus or taxibus) mostly since we've arrived, as the locals do. Often when we ask our hotel or other travellers how to get places, they'll tell us the voyager or big bus options, which are often more expensive, and/or mostly taken by foreigners or higher class locals. We like the personal approach and challenge to minibuses.

    Today was a decision I think both Jack and I wished we could take back. We were instructed by our hostel on where to go for the big buses going to Mbale, but we chose to go to the taxi park where the minibuses leave from. I was in the back row against the window, with the usual 3 people to my right (4 per row), for which I thought I scored since they were small girls. Jack, the row in front of me, also had a small (maybe 10 years old) girl to her left. All good so far.

    It's should be a 2 hour bus ride, but I never checked the time, so who knows. About 10 minutes in, the 10 year old starts puking. At first in a handkerchief. Then someone gave her a bag. This was on and off throughout. Maybe an hour in Jack notices her thigh is wet. Unknown origins. Every once in a while, as we hit speed bumps or the breaks, there's a chicken, half of its body tied inside a plastic bag, the other half fighting to get out, which comes from underneath my seat to rub up against my leg. I got scared everytime, kicked my legs up everytime, only to get a dirty look from the women in front of me who's seat I'm kicking. The little girl in the middle of her two sisters to my right then pukes all over herself. That was a lot of fun since she was just eating a muffin and drinking an orange fizzy drink. My nursing friends won't mind reading this next part, but for the rest of you, if you've got a weaker stomach, skip ahead. Someone gave her a bag and she proceeded to wipe the puke bits off of herself and push them onto the ground using this bag as a glove. She then left the bag on the ground. So I supplied her a new bag that she can hopefully aim for next time. We eventually dropped off the lady that was sitting next to Jack's puker. As she got off, I noticed her bum area of her dress had a wet ring around it. And to further clarify what we were dealing with, I got an unmistakable whiff of urine. Remember, Jack has a wet thigh. I won't lie, I laughed a little on the inside. Few minutes later, we drop off Jack's puker and she's also wet, leaving behind a wet seat.

    As much as I'd like to say this is entirely out of the norm, it's not really. We've witnessed plenty of people being sick in buses. Sometimes in bags. Sometimes on the ground. People tend to ignore it. We were once behind a baby that projectile vomited against the seat, the window, the works. When they got off, people sat in that seat, no problem. And I've actually seen the peeing before also! I swear! I just can't remember where. The wet seat, the person looking awkward... I've seen it! I remember it being a long bus ride. But today! 2, maybe 3 hour bus ride, max! How bad can you have to go...

    Anywho, that's my input for today. To end on a good note, we made it to Sipi Falls. Found a place to stay where they gave us this cute little straw, round "bandas". We've got our hike for the morning booked nice and early so we can make it across to Kenya by tomorrow evening. Wait until you see the views!
    Read more

  • Day3

    Kabala

    July 7, 2017 in Uganda

    We had a long journey today, tent down and away by 6am and not arriving until 7pm. It was an enjoyable ride as the scenery changed to be more rural and hillsides covered in crops. We crossed the Equator again, had a roadside lunch stop and played a few games of cards.

  • Day2

    Kampala

    July 6, 2017 in Uganda

    We drove from Jinga to Kampala, starting on mud roads before we reached the main road. Enjoyed passing the villages before we went around the capital of Uganda, stopping at a massive local market which we loved. There were lots of lovely looking veg, not so nice looking offal, clothes... Stayed at a campsite just outside the city near the lake and had a relaxing couple of hours by the pool, after trying to clean off some of the mud our tent got covered in.Read more

You might also know this place by the following names:

Republic of Uganda, Uganda, ዩጋንዳ, اوغندا, Uqanda, Уганда, উগান্ডা, ཡུ་གན་ཌ།, Ouganda, Uganda nutome, Ουγκάντα, Ugando, اوگاندا, Unganndaa, Oganda, Úganda, યુગાંડા, Yuganda, אוגנדה, यूगांडा, Ուգանդա, ウガンダ共和国, უგანდა, អ៊ូហ្កង់ដា, ಉಗಾಂಡಾ, 우간다, ئوگاندا, ອູການດາ, യുഗാണ്ട, युगांडा, ယူဂန္ဒာ, युगाण्डा, Oeganda, ଉଗାଣ୍ଡା, يوګانډا, Ubugande, Ugandäa, Ugaanda, உகாண்டா, యుగాండా, ยูกันดา, ʻIukanitā, ئۇگاندا, Уґанда, یوگانڈا, Lugandayän, Orílẹ́ède Uganda, 乌干达, i-Uganda

Join us:

FindPenguins for iOS FindPenguins for Android

Sign up now