Zimbabwe

Zimbabwe

Curious what backpackers do in Zimbabwe? Discover travel destinations all over the world of travelers writing a travel blog on FindPenguins.

53 travelers at this place:

  • Day1

    An overland, mobile camping safari from Victoria Falls to Maun via Chobe, the Makgadikgadi Salt Pans and the Okavango Delta: with the express purpose of learning a little about Botswana prior to linking up with the students of Sedie and Mathiba Schools

    Fri 7 April Depart Sydney, Australia
    Sat 8 April Arrive Victoria Falls (midday), Zimbabwe
    Sun 9 April Victoria Falls
    Mon 10 April Kasane, Chobe National Park
    Tues 11 April Kasane, Chobe National Park
    Wed 12 April Nata & visit to salt pans
    Thu 13 April Makgadikgadi Pans (Planet Baobab)
    Fri 14 April Maun camping
    Sat 15 April Okavango,mokoros and overnight camping
    Sun 16 April Okavango, mokoros and overnight camping
    Mon 17 April Sitatunga Camp & horse riding safari
    Tues 18 April Sedie School & Lion Conservation talk
    Wed 19 April Sedie School & Rhino Rehabilitation project
    Thu 20 April Sedie School & Wildlife film show (Dr Tim Liversedge)
    Fri 21 April Sedie School, then fly Maun - Johannesburg - Perth
    Sat 22 April Perth - Sydney
    Read more

  • Day8

    With the memories of our wildlife encounters firmly etched in our minds, we crossed the border to Zimbabwe - a painfull experience. After a quick visit to the hotel we crossed to the spectacular Victoria Falls, also known by the local name of “Mosi-oa Tunya” (the smoke that thunders).

    Accommodation : Victoria Rainbow Hotel

  • Day2

    We arrived in the capital of Zimbabwe yesterday, a vast contrast to the surrounding countryside we had been in. The avenues of bungalows made you feel like you were in parts of rural Britain, apart from the walls, electric fencing, barbed wire, security guards and bars on windows! We are having a couple of nights staying in a hostel so all enjoyed a meal out at a western restaurant where we welcomed three new travel companions and said farewell to one. The party then continued once we were back at the hostel with everyone getting along really well. Today, after massive bacon sandwiches that we cooked for ourselves, a group of us went for a walk into town. It was enjoyable just to wander around the streets, not being bothered by people to buy things but just happy to offer directions or just chat. Since 2005 their economy has been in serious trouble and physical currency is scarce. People are able to draw out only $80 a month. People pay by using their phones and doing a bank transfer at the till. We are using US dollars but have managed to get a $2 Mozambique bond which is equivalent to a $2!US. The bonds are produced so the currency can be devalued at any time. Inflation is such that in 2005 there was a 20 thousand dollar note, three years later a 150 trillion dollar note had been issued. It became so bad that notes produced in a morning had been made obsolete by the following day. Tonight we went to the Oasis house and had a local meal cooked for us. We had beef stew and sadza, a polenta like consistency made from ground maize, mixed with water and heated up. Each country we have been in has it but calls it something different.Read more

  • Day7

    We went on a two hour horse ride through their game reserve where we saw giraffes, warthogs and wildebeest up close. In the distance we saw lions and elephants. It was a great way to see wildlife although James was told near the start that his horse doesn't like wildlife! Thankfully the horse behaved himself once he knew who was boss. Our route took us through open grasslands, thorny bushes and a waterhole.Read more

  • Day9

    We have had three amazing nights at Antelope Park, not only is it a relaxing place to stay with a great vibe, it has friendly staff and lots of wildlife activities. It is set in 1,215 hectares of bush with the main facilities set next to gardens, a river and reservoir. We were welcomed off the truck by some staff singing and playing the drums. Later on ponies, elephants, a bush baby and Jackie the donkey were wandering around camp! See later blogs for wildlife encounters. Our time here has been a highlight of Africa.Read more

  • Day8

    Five of us went to walk with the four elephants, for over 2 hours. It was an amazing opportunity to just follow them as they walked through the bush, eating the trees as they went. While they are peaceful animals they have incredible strength which we witnessed as they were either pushing trees over or ripping branches off. The thick thorns didn't bother them at all while they were eating them. We were able to touch them or just stand by watching them, although we chose to give a wide bearth to the least friendly female. It was fun watching them at a mud pool, although we did get splattered ourselves! They store upto 20 litres of water in their stomach and listening to them empty their full trucks sounds like a huge hose being emptied.Read more

  • Day22

    We have had three 5am starts in a row now, followed by three long journey days to leave Zanzibar and head overland on the truck towards Malawi. The twelve hour travelling day on Tuesday was beaten by the 14 hour drive yesterday! Today's should only be about 10... A bonus of these long days means we have had two bush camps, the first one we had time for a camp fire which both Junior and Senior James managed to build very successfully. Arriving late last night we ditched the planned chicken stew and had a quick breakfast tea with left over potatoes, baked beans, tomatoes, eggs and toast - ideal when you're really hungry with all hands on deck. Often, the driver, hasn't had it easy, not only suffering from Malaria, another illness related to Malaria and Typhoid but is also a target for the very corrupt traffic police in Tanzania. Many times they stop him, to try and fine him for speeding, which clearly he hasn't but who can argue with them? All this and he has never complained once, he just keeps on smiling.
    Yesterday's scenery was particularly interesting with hills, valleys, villages boa boa trees (the same as boab trees in Aus) and a drive through Mikumi National Park as the main surfaced road transects it. Apparently it is home to pygmy elephants and other unusual looking wildlife. We saw lots of giraffes, zebra, warthogs, impala, birds, and blue wildebeest. All great to see from the truck while just driving through on route to somewhere else.
    Read more

  • Day1

    We entered Zimbabwe this morning (three countries in two days). It seems very poor, with coal and cattle as the main source of income. The homes still have a small cluster of buildings but these round houses have a higher pitched, thatched roof.

  • Day8

    We had a couple of mornings where we went and had time with an elephant, feeding it and petting it. We also had the chance to sit up on its back and cling on whike it stood up. They are trained through positive reinforcement, gaining food treats as a reward. It showed that they are still wild animals when one elephant refused to sit diwn and allow our friend to get off her back. She had to climb onto the shoulders of the elephant trainer.Read more

  • Day14

    We took the night train to Victoria Falls, having quite a social evening (read VERY social evening with several cabins becoming packed party rooms) before looking out of the window in the early morning to see lions, reedbuck and elephants. We walked onto the bridge over the Zambezi, which is the border between Zambia and Zimbabwe, watching some people bungee jump and getting a glimpse towards the falls. In a massive change from border protocol, we just had a scrap of paper stamped in order to let us leave/return to Zimbabwe, which no-one wanted to check in either direction.
    Victoria Falls is very much established as a tourist centre and whilst small and a bit rough around the edges, has a charming atmosphere. The wildlife is free to roam, including warthog and charming banded mongoose. Elephants and lion also roam at night, with elephants making holes in walls to get to the fruit trees. Best to avoid dark places after nightfall! (Not a bad bit of travel advice, however not always.....).
    Read more

You might also know this place by the following names:

Republic of Zimbabwe, Simbabwe, Zimbabwe, Zembabwe, ዚምቧቤ, زيمبابوي, Zimbabve, Зімбабвэ, Зимбабве, Zimbabuwe, জিম্বাবুয়ে, ཛིམ་བྷཱ་བེ།, ཛིམ་བབ་ཝེ, Zimbabwe nutome, Ζιμπάμπουε, Zimbabvo, Zimbawe, رودزیای جنوبی, Simbaabuwe, Simbabvi, An tSiombáib, Cimbabue, ઝિમ્બાબ્વે, זימבבואה, ज़िम्बाब्वे, Զիմբաբվե, Simbabve, ジンバブエ共和国, ზიმბაბვე, ហ្ស៊ីមបាបវ៉េ, ಜಿಂಬಾಬ್ವೆ, 짐바브웨, زیمبابوی, ຊິມບັບເວ, Zimbabvė, Zimbaboe, സിംബാബ്വേ, झिम्बाब्वे, Żimbabwe, ဇင်ဘာဘွေ, जिम्बाबे, ଜିମ୍ବାୱେ, Zimbábue, Zimbäbwe, සිම්බාබ්වේ, Simbaabwe, ஜிம்பாப்வே, జింబాబ్వే, ซิมบับเว, Simipapuei, Зімбабве, زمبابوے, Dim-ba-bu-ê (Zimbabwe), Orílẹ́ède ṣimibabe, 津巴布韦, i-Zimbabwe

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