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  • Day33k

    2013_12 Ethiopia

    December 23, 2013 in Ethiopia ⋅ 18 °C

    Die Reise hatten wir bei Intrepid gebucht. Die Durchführung war aber dann durch DRAGOMAN. Generell war das eine tolle Reise, auch wenn das verfügbare Essen in Ethiopia mehr als einfach war. Eigentlich konnte man außerhalb der Hauptstadt Adidas Abeba nur Spiegeleier essen. Die Quartiere waren absolut unterstes Niveau. Da hat man sich schon freiwillig ein Zelt gewünscht. In Ethiopia macht DRAGOMAN einen loop (ähnlich wie in Mongolia). Nochmal würden wir aber dahin nicht mehr reisen

    Editiert am 10.02.2021
    Text von Wolfgang
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  • Day33k

    2013_12 Ethiopia

    December 22, 2013 in Ethiopia

    Im Hochland von Ethiopia war jedem einzelnen Reisenden ein bewaffneter Einheimischer zugeordnet. Generell war das ne coole Sache. Wir haben uns aber zu keinen Zeitpunkt in dem Land unsicher gefühlt.

    Editiert am 10.02.2021
    Text von Wolfgang
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  • Day33k

    2012_11 Morocco

    November 20, 2012 in Morocco ⋅ ☀️ 19 °C

    Day 10: Aroumd
    Bid farewell to the Sahara and journey over the spectacular Tizi n'Tichka Pass (2,260 metres above sea level) to Toubkal National Park (approximately 5 hours), photographing snow-dappled mountains and valleys in full flower along the way. At the end of the road in Imlil, store your main luggage and load a daypack onto a pack mule. Walk into traditional mountain village life with a one-hour trek up to the peaceful village of Aroumd, far from the reach of the modern world. If you don't feel comfortable with the walk, you can ride a mule instead. Perched on a rocky outcrop, the remote village of Aroumd offers stunning views across the High Atlas Mountains and a unique opportunity to experience traditional Berber culture. Spend the night in a family-run mountain home (gite) in Aroumd. Surrounded by the smell of woodstoves and bread, meet the host family and enjoy Berber hospitality and food. Facilities at the homestay are shared (both the bathroom and sleeping arrangements) but cosy, comfortable and definitely a unique Intrepid experience.

    Day 11: Essaouira
    Take a morning walk through the valleys and trails of the stunning Atlas Mountains. Afterwards, head westwards for five hours towards the Atlantic Coast and the old fishing town of Essaouira, a city where the medina brushes up against the Atlantic Ocean. Sandstone walkways contrast with whitewashed houses, bright blue sky and the sand of the surrounding beaches and dunes. This artists' town was once home to sizeable British and Jewish populations, and its charm has seduced people like Orson Welles and Jimi Hendrix, who (according to local legend) spent much of his time here in the 1960s. It is one of North Africa's most attractive places, and you will soon find yourself slipping into the easy-going rhythm of this Moroccan town with a European seaside twist. Stay in a restored riad, or Moroccan mansion, a traditional nobleman's house unique to Morocco that’s a calming oasis away from the buzz of the medina. Your riad is beautifully designed and decorated in traditional Moroccan style, cosy yet historical. This is likely to be one of the most memorable stays of your journey.

    Day 12: Essaouira
    Today, join a local guide for a walking tour through the old medina, Jewish mellah, port and skala (sea wall). Afterwards, use your free time to get under the skin of the town. The narrow streets of Essaouira are ideal for casual exploration. Their size discourages cars, and on a walk through the town it feels as though little has changed since the days of sea pirates. The fishing port is a serious commercial operation and there’s much fun to be had observing the daily catch and its subsequent auction. A freshly-cooked plate of the day's catch is highly recommended. Browse the plentiful shops and intriguing art galleries that make this little town a particularly pleasant place to unwind for a few days. It has a growing reputation for its unique art and is becoming even more famous for its burled Thuya wood, delicately formed and inlaid in tiny shops that are built into the thick walls of the Portuguese ramparts. The scent from the oils used to polish the richly coloured wood permeates the air and makes walking down the streets incredibly pleasant. If you’d prefer to relax, don't miss the opportunity to indulge in a hammam or local-style bath.

    Day 13: Marrakech
    Chat with locals on a shared bus ride to Marrakech (approximately 3 hours), an ancient, exotic city wrapped in European modernity. Marrakech is a feast for the senses. Be enticed by the alluring scents and brilliant colours of the spice markets, the sounds of the musicians, the rich folds of carpets, delectable foods, acrobats and perfumed gardens. Perhaps join the thronging crowds for dinner at the famous Djemaa el Fna, one of the largest public spaces in the world and unique to Marrakech. When night falls on this square it transforms in to a hive of activity. Snake-charmers, henna-painters, performers and storytellers share the square with a street food bazaar, packed with stalls loaded with Moroccan delicacies, including snail soup! Perhaps enjoy a bite of famous Moroccan pastries with a glass of freshly squeezed orange juice, and then maybe finish your day with a cup of tea on one of the roof-top restaurants overlooking the square.

    Day 15: Marrakech
    Your Best of Morocco adventure comes to an end today. Check-out time is usually around midday and you are free to leave at any time. Additional accommodation can be pre-booked if you wish to spend more time exploring here. Speak to your leader about the wealth of extra activities to do around Marrakech.

    Danach waren wir noch einige Tage an der Küste. Und zwar wieder in Essaouira. Dort hatten wir auch ein excellentes Hotel.

    Editiert am 11.02.2021
    Text von Wolfgang
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  • Day33k

    2012_11 Morocco

    November 13, 2012 in Morocco ⋅ ☀️ 19 °C

    Day 5: Midelt
    Board the private minibus and leave the intensity of the city behind for the simplicity of the scenic Middle Atlas Mountains (approximately 4 hours). Drive south, inland through a variety of spectacular scenery – fertile valleys, cedar and pine forests and barren, rocky landscapes. The area is populated with wandering nomadic shepherds attending to their flocks. Pass through cedar forests which are home to Barbary apes, North Africa's only monkey, and on to your destination of Midelt. Nestled in a valley, Midelt is a market town, originally built as a base for mining in the area, and surrounded by farmland and orchards. Stretch your legs as you explore the nearby village of Bremmem and take a closer look at local farming life. Visit Kasbah Myriam, an embroidery workshop run by Franciscan nuns with the aim of providing sustainable employment and education to local Berber women. This is the perfect place to pick up a souvenir. You could also check out an optional traditional music performance in Midelt.

    Day 6: Sahara Camp
    Today it's a five-hour drive towards the mighty Sahara Desert. Since we'll have the convenience of our own private minivan, there will be many opportunities to stop and admire views of Kasbahs and palmeries (valleys lush with date palms, fields and orchards) along the way. Drive through changing scenery, from barren mountainsides to fertile valleys, pausing in frontier towns like Erfoud and Rissani, before reaching the end of the road at the small Saharan settlement of Merzouga. With a backdrop of the orange-coloured Erg Chebbi sand dunes, the charming Saharan village of Merzouga feels wonderfully isolated, like the modern world has left it behind. Store your main baggage, saddle up your daypack and mount a camel for a one-hour sunset ride into the desert. The Erg Chebbi dunes are the most stunning in the country and an essential part of any visit to Morocco. An erg is a vast sea of shifting wind-swept sand that's formed into picturesque, undulating crests and valleys. Located at the end of a sealed road and just 20 kilometres from the Algerian border, this really feels like frontier country. Spend the night in a desert camp under the stars. Our local friends will prepare a hearty feast, so all you need to do is sit back and relax. Notes: The camp is a simple affair, with bedding and basic toilet facilities provided. The blankets provided are usually sufficient for most travellers between April and October, but you may like to bring your own sleeping bag for extra warmth, especially during the months between November and March.

    Day 7: Todra Gorge
    Return from the desert and begin the drive to Todra Gorge. On the way visit the oasis museum of El Khorbat, before continuing on to the beautiful Todra Valley (approximately 5 hours in total), which follows the foothills of the Atlas Mountains and is dotted with mud-brick villages perched on hillsides. The remarkable scenery – sprawling green valleys and rocks sculpted into stunning formations by the wind – will be your home for next two nights.

    Day 8: Todra Gorge
    Today enjoy free time to explore the Todra Valley. A guided hike through the gorge and over a nearby mountain pass is highly recommended. There are a couple of circuits to choose from, but the most popular choice, and the one we recommend, is a 10 kilometre circuit that will take about four hours. Accompanied by a local guide, you’ll walk a trail that undulates slightly here and there, but isn't too challenging if you have a basic level of fitness. On the walk you'll pass Berber villages, meeting local Berbers along the way and perhaps having a chance to share a cup of mint tea with some of them. The surrounding mountains and the famous Rose Valley in the distance make a sensational setting. To fully enjoy the walk, you need a moderate level of fitness, good walking boots or sturdy trainers, sunglasses, sun cream and plenty of water. For lunch you can join some local ladies in their mud-brick kasbah, a fantastic opportunity to see how people live in this largely unchanged culture. Simply lounging by the hotel pool with views over the lush palmeries and soaring cliff faces is also a great way to spend your day here.

    Day 9: Ait Benhaddou
    Today travel south for four hours to Ait Benhaddou. The scenic drive will take you past ancient kasbah ruins, former colonial military outposts, austere mountains and valleys of palm trees and irrigated fields. Pause for lunch in Ouarzazate, where productions such as Lawrence of Arabia, The Sheltering Sky and Black Hawk Down were filmed. Time permitting, you can take a tour of the Atlas Movie Studios. Make a short visit to Horizon Association for People With Disabilities, an organisation dedicated to the rehabilitation, health and empowerment of people with disabilities. Some of the services they provide include the building and fitting of prosthetic limbs and custom-made wheelchairs, and physio and social therapy for sufferers of accidents and illness. They also train locals in pottery, weaving, metal work and jewellery making. We're very proud to support this project through The Intrepid Foundation. Continue on to your destination of Ait Benhaddou. Centuries ago, this was an important stop for caravans carrying salt across the Sahara. Today its grand kasbah, a fine example of clay architecture, has been listed as a World Heritage site. In the late afternoon, why not enjoy a cooking demonstration to learn the secrets behind Morocco's most famous cuisine: couscous and tagine

    Editiert am 11.02.2021
    Text von Wolfgang
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  • Day33k

    2012_11 Morocco

    November 12, 2012 in Morocco ⋅ 🌬 18 °C

    Day 1: Casablanca
    Salaam Aleikum! Welcome to Morocco. Your adventure begins today with a welcome meeting at 6pm – check with hotel reception to confirm the time. If you can't arrange a flight that will arrive in time, you may wish to arrive a day early. We'll be happy to book additional accommodation for you (subject to availability). If you're going to be late, please inform the hotel reception. We'll be collecting your insurance details and next of kin information at this meeting, so please have these on hand. As there's little free time included in Casablanca on this trip, to fully explore the city consider coming a day earlier. Modelled after Marseille in France, the city is famous for its art deco buildings and the modern-day masterpiece, the Hassan II Mosque. A pleasant way to spend the day exploring Casablanca is to wander the old medina and the city walls, then jump in a taxi to visit the Quartiers des Habous, the new medina. Finish the day with a walk along the Corniche, watching the locals play football on the beach, or take it easy with a glass of sweet mint tea in one of the many great cafes. Note: Please be aware that some of our travellers to Casablanca are being approached by locals offering excursions before their Intrepid trip commences. This has been particularly prevalent in and around the hotels used by Intrepid. These guides are in no way connected to Intrepid Travel and we cannot guarantee the safety or quality standards of their tours. We strongly advise customers against joining any tour offered by unauthorised guides. Intrepid Travel assesses the safety of all optional excursions offered by our tour leaders. If you would like more information on the excursions available, please contact us before you travel or see the Intrepid-branded notice in the reception of your hotel.

    Day 2: Rabat/Meknes
    Today take an early morning one-hour train to the historical town of Rabat. Rabat's history is long and colourful, having been host to Roman settlements, pirates and more recently the Moroccan parliament. It contains numerous fine Arab monuments, some dating from the 10th to 15th century Almohad and Merenid dynasties, and others that are far older. The earliest known settlement is Sala, occupying an area now known as the Chellah. Store your luggage and spend a few hours strolling through the city's old quarter, then walk up to Kasbah des Oudaias and enjoy views over the Atlantic Ocean. Afterwards, continue to Meknes on a three-hour train. The imperial city of Meknes was built when Sultan Moulay Ismail (a contemporary of Louis XIV) set out to create his own version of Versailles, using over 25,000 slaves to construct walls, gates and over 50 palaces.

    Day 3: Volubilis/Fes
    This morning is free to explore Meknes. In the 17th century Sultan Moulay Ismail turned Meknes from a provincial town to a spectacular Imperial city – visit his immense Heri es Souani Granary, a mammoth architectural feat, and the city's now crumbling imperial palaces. Try a camel burger for lunch at friendly local restaurant in the medina. Later, board a private minibus and travel for one hour through rolling hills and olive groves to the archaeological site of Volubilis. World Heritage-listed Volubilis was once a provincial Roman capital, a distant outpost of the empire, and the remains make an undeniably impressive sight. Upon arrival, take a tour around the ruins with a local guide. Please remember to pack drinking water, hat, sunglasses and sun cream for this tour as it may get hot and you will be exposed to the sun. And, of course, don’t forget to take your camera as the town is filled with fantastic mosaics along the Decumanus Maximus, many of which remain intact. Afterwards, make the two-hour drive to Fes, where you'll spend the next two nights. Fes is the spiritual and cultural heart of Morocco; vibrant, noisy, fascinating and overwhelming – a visual and pungent feast for the senses – with a huge, well-preserved medieval old city that’s the mother of all medinas.

    Day 4: Fes
    Take a guided group walking tour of the old city, known locally as Fes el Bali. Step back into the Middle Ages in the labyrinth of the Medina, which is alive with craftsmen, markets, tanneries and mosques. Pass donkeys piled high with goods (this is one of the largest car-free urban zones in the world) and explore the specialty sections that divide the souk. Look out for the Medersa Bou Inania, one of the city's most beautiful buildings, which has recently been restored and is now open to tourists. Visit the Belghazi Museum, Medresse el Attarine and the splendid Funduk Nejjarine, a beautifully restored 18th century inn. You'll also see the famous tannery, known for the iconic view overlooking its dye pits, and a ceramics factory where you can see potters working in the traditional way. In the evening, perhaps enjoy a delicious group dinner (at your own cost) of Moroccan specialities like harira (chickpea soup) and chicken-stuffed pastilla with couscous. The group may also head to the Palais Jamai for a drink. Watching the sunset over the Medina while a dozen prayer calls vie for attention is an experience you'll likely remember for a long time.Notes: Today’s experience will include shopping in carefully selected places. As the receipt of commissions or kickbacks in exchange for recommending particular shops, services or activities is ingrained in the culture of the Moroccan tourism industry, Intrepid has established a centralised system of receiving and distributing payments from these recommended suppliers. For more information, please refer to ‘Important Notes’ section or talk to your Tour leader on the ground.

    Editiert am 11.02.2021
    Text von Wolfgang
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  • Day33k

    2012_09 Würzburg

    September 13, 2012 in Germany ⋅ ⛅ 13 °C

    In Würzburg hatten Heidi und ich einen Kurzaufenthalt. Heidi findet die Stadt toll. "Ich würde mich jetzt nicht vor Begeisterung überschlagen". Als ich diese Zeilen geschrieben habe - so in etwa 2015 - war ich noch bei weitem nicht so tiefenentspannt - wie ich das heute bin. Heute würde ich eine Stadt - wie Würzburg - mit anderen Augen sehen. Früher konnte ich mit Städten gar nichts anfangen. Heute kann ich für kurze Zeit damit leben.

    Editiert am 11.02.2021
    Text von Wolfgang
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  • Day33k

    2012_08 Die Insel "Juist"

    August 13, 2012 in Germany ⋅ ⛅ 20 °C

    Ich bin im August mit dem Rad die „Deutsche Fehnroute“ in einem Schlag gefahren. Auf dem Rückweg an der Nordseeküste entlang wurde das Wetter plötzlich hochsommerlich. Also habe ich mich spontan entschlossen mit dem Rad für ca. 5 Tage noch nach Juist zu fahren. Ich hatte Glück und habe dort eine nette Pension gefunden, was in der Hauptsaison so spontan nicht ganz einfach ist. Für mich ist Juist faktisch die Schönste aller Ostfriesischen Inseln.

    Dann bin ich mit dem Rad wieder zurück nach Bederkesa gefahren

    Editiert am 11.02.2021
    Text von Wolfgang
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  • Day33k

    2012_08 Radtour "Deutsche Fehenroute"

    August 10, 2012 in Germany ⋅ ☁️ 17 °C

    Ich bin im August mit dem Rad die „Deutsche Fehnroute“ in einem Schlag gefahren. Sie führt in einer vielfältigen Runde durch das Südliche Ostfriesland und den Nordwesten Niedersachsens. Auf der Radtour lernt man das ostfriesische Binnenland zwischen der Ems und der Kreisstadt Leer im Westen, Aurich im Norden, Papenburg im Süden und dem Ammerland im Osten kennen. Geprägt wurde dieser beschauliche Landstrich durch die Fehnkultur, d. h. die Moorkultivierung nach dem Fehnverfahren. Davon zeugen bis heute die zahlreichen Kanäle, die pittoresken Klappbrücken und weithin sichtbaren Windmühlen. Das Wort „Fehn“ kommt vom niederländischen Veen und bedeutet Moor. Die Fehnkultur stammt aus dem 16. und 17. Jahrhundert und hatte als Ziel, Moorböden landwirtschaftlich nutzbar zu machen. Damit unmittelbar verbunden war die Gewinnung von Torf als Brennmaterial. Durch diese Urbarmachung der im Nordwesten Deutschlands weit verbreiteten Hochmoore entstanden die Fehnsiedlungen. Für den Abtransport des Torfes und zur Entwässerung wurden eigens schiffbare Kanäle angelegt, an denen sich die Häuser dicht an dicht aneinanderreihen. Torf wird mittlerweile kaum noch abgebaut, doch geblieben sind die so typischen Fehnsiedlungen entlang der Kanäle. Scheinbar endlos liegt auf beiden Seiten der Kanäle Haus an Haus. Malerische Klappbrücken schlagen an vielen Stellen die Verbindung zwischen den Ufern.

    Fakt ist: Ich bin schon schönere Touren geradelt! Hier ist der Anteil von Straßennutzung relativ groß. Das ist eben nicht optimal für den Radfahrer. Danach bin ich mit dem Rad via Fünftagesaufenthalt Juist wieder zurück nach Bederkesa gefahren.

    Editiert am 11.02.2021
    Text von Wolfgang
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  • Day33k

    2012_07 Wanderung "Hochrhöner"

    July 13, 2012 in Germany ⋅ ☀️ 17 °C

    Neben der faszinierenden Landschaft, die in den Etappen auch bei den Hinweisen zu Geologie und Flora gewürdigt wird, gibt es im Bereich des Hochrhöners auch kulturkundliche und andere Sehenswürdigkeiten, wie zum Beispiel das weltberühmte Bad Kissingen, das romanische Grabmal des Minnesängers Otto von Bodenlauben und seiner Gattin Beatrix in Frauenroth, Kloster und Kirche auf dem Kreuzberg, das Deutsche Segelflugmuseum auf der Wasserkuppe. Ferner kommen Sie durch das Rhöner Museumsdorf in Tann, passieren Frankenheim als höchstgelegenes Dorf der Rhön und erreichen schließlich das Sole-Heilbad Bad Salzungen. Ein besonderer Bestandteil der Rhönlandschaft sind nicht zuletzt die Stätten des Glaubens und der Besinnung, dazu gehören der Kreuzweg bei Stralsbach, die Kirche in Oberweißenbrunn mit ihrer Barockausstattung in neuem Gebäude oder die St.-Gangolfs-Kapelle auf der Milseburg.

    Der Hochrhöner führt von Bad Kissingen an der Fränkischen Saale nach Bad Salzungen an der Werra, beide Orte sind mit der Bahn zu erreichen. Am Roten Moor gabelt sich die Route. Die Westroute führt über die Kuppenrhön, die Ostroute über die Lange Rhön. Bei Andenhausen vereinigen sich beide Strecken wieder. Die Route von Bad Kissingen nach Bad Salzungen über die Kuppenrhön hat eine Länge von 138?Kilometer, über die Lange Rhön sind es 119?Kilometer. Die vorliegende Etappeneinteilung ermöglicht unter Berücksichtigung der Etappenorte, zwischen dem Roten Moor und Andenhausen entweder die West- oder die Ostvariante zu wandern.
    Der Hochrhöner ist in beide Richtungen mit dem orangefarbenen „Ö“ und „Hochrhöner“ markiert. Die Zusätze „Lange Rhön“ (Ost) und „Kuppenrhön“ (West) kennzeichnen die Varianten. Der vorliegende Führer beschreibt die Begehung von Süd nach Nord. Abseits des Weges gelegene Wanderparkplätze und Siedlungen mit Übernachtungsmöglichkeit sind über Zubringer an den Hochrhöner angebunden, die mit grünem „Ö“, „Hochrhöner“ und „Zubringer“ gekennzeichnet sind. Die sog. Extratouren, 20 hervorragende Tages-Rundtouren und ebenfalls Premium-Wege, sind immer mit dem roten Anfangsbuchstaben des Tour-Namens gekennzeichnet, z. B. „M“ für Moorweg.

    Editiert am 11.02.2021
    Text von Wolfgang
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  • Day33k

    2012_07 Wanderung "Hochrhöner"

    July 13, 2012 in Germany ⋅ ☀️ 15 °C

    Länge des Wanderweges: 138 km
    Das war quasi mein erster großer Wanderweg, den ich auch in einem Schlag durchgewandert bin. Seither bin ich von diesem schönen Wandervirus angesteckt und habe danach noch diverse weitere Wanderwege gemacht. Ich orientiere mich immer an den sehr handlichen und informativen Wanderbüchern „Hikeline“ vom Esterbauer Verlag. Die Rhön erstreckt sich etwa 90 Kilometer von Gemünden am Main im Süden bis Vacha an der Werra im Norden und in einer Breite von ca. 50 Kilometer von Fulda im Westen bis Meiningen im Osten. Kernstück der Rhön ist die sogenannte Hohe oder Lange Rhön im Osten, die etwa bogenförmig verläuft. Dabei handelt es sich um eine überwiegend von Wiesen und Mooren bedeckte Hochfläche auf ungefähr 800 Metern Höhe. Sie besteht aus dunklen vulkanischen Gesteinen und wird vor allem an ihren Rändern von etwas höheren Kuppen überragt. Eine solche Kuppe ist z. B. die Wasserkuppe, mit 950 Metern die höchste Erhebung des Gebirges. Die Hohe Rhön ist weitgehend von einem Saum aus Muschelkalk umgeben. Westlich und nordwestlich der Hochfläche befindet sich die sogenannte Kuppenrhön, die aus zahlreichen einzelnen Bergen besteht, deren Inneres meistens helles vulkanisches Gestein enthält. Die weiten unbewaldeten Flächen, die blumenreichen Bergwiesen, die oft gute Fernsicht, doch auch der Nebel über den Mooren und im Winter der Schnee schaffen Landschaftsbilder von großer Schönheit und erinnern häufig an alpine Verhältnisse. Man sollte es in der Tat einmal erlebt haben, hier über den von Nebel erfüllten Tälern auf sonnigen Höhen zu wandern und in die Ferne zu blicken. Spätestens dann erschließt sich die Rhön als das „Land der offenen Fernen“. Durch die hohen Niederschläge und die teils wasserundurchlässigen Böden gibt es zahlreiche Quellen und ausgedehnte Moore. In der Rhön entspringen die zur Weser orientierten Flüsse Fulda, Felda und Ulster sowie die zum Main und damit Rhein fließende Fränkische Saale und die Sinn.

    Editiert am 11.02.2021
    Text von Wolfgang
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