October - November 2020
  • Day17

    Büyükada

    November 11, 2020 in Turkey ⋅ ⛅ 16 °C

    Now, for a last post from Turkey: Büyükada is the largest of the Prince Islands (sometimes called Prince's Islands), a 9 island archipelago in the Sea of Marmara, southeast of Istanbul.
    The 1st picture looks from the ferry to the island. The next 4 are typical scenes around Büyükada. The last looks from the island harbor across to part of the Asian half of Istanbul.Read more

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  • Day16

    Gallipoli

    November 10, 2020 in Turkey ⋅ ⛅ 15 °C

    In recognition of my down under friends. Gallipoli was a major battle of WW 1 that involved troops from Australia and New Zealand. Having been at the ANZAC memorial in Alice Springs, I can understand a bit more of the importance all this holds.
    The 1st picture is ANZAC Bay where that expeditionary force landed. 2nd is a statue commemorating a Turkish soldier who carried a wound allied soldier back to the allied lines. 3rd is the Lone Pine Australian memorial and cemetery. 4th is a look over the battlefield. 5th is an NZ memorial.
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  • Day16

    Dardanelles

    November 10, 2020 in Turkey ⋅ ⛅ 15 °C

    Major transportation artery that controls water borne shipping to Istanbul and the Black Sea from the Mediterranean. This has always been a strategic prize and economic generator for whoever could control it. (See posts for Troy and Gallipoli for examples.)
    The posts look at both the Asian and European sides, then both directions from the ferry crossing at the narrowest point near Çannekale.
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  • Day15

    Troy

    November 9, 2020 in Turkey ⋅ ☀️ 19 °C

    Hugely important ancient city, known to most of us from Homer's Iliad. Troy is located at the mouth of the Dardanelles, the entry to the Sea of Marmara, Istanbul, the Bosporus and Black Sea. They had great wealth from controlling the major trade route, which, when you come right down to it, is what the Trojan War was probably all about. It seems likely that Helen running off was an excuse.
    Troy dates back 5,000 years and has 10 distinct layers. Troy of the Iliad is the 6th layer or Troy VI.
    The 1st picture is a life size construction of what the horse may have looked like. 2&3 are the south and east gates to the city that are thought to have been part of Troy VI. 4th is a later ceremonial area. 5th is the original well dating back to Troy I. Last is a decorative ceiling piece. Even today, ceiling pieces are often recessed like this to reduce weight.
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  • Day15

    Pergamom Acropolis

    November 9, 2020 in Turkey ⋅ ☀️ 20 °C

    The upper city of a typical Greco-Roman city and one of the better preserved jn Asia Minor. The lower city was mostly built over. Sadly, the altar of Zeus was in great shape, but is in a museum in Berlin.
    The 1st two pictures are of the temple of Trajan, built by Hadrian in the 2nd century. The lower arches held a sacrificial altar. The 3rd looks across what was a royal palace. 4th is the theater, said to be the steepest in the world. It is hellenistic architecture, as much as 400 years older than other theaters I've seen. The 5th looks across what was the hero's house, and last is the view from the top.
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  • Day15

    Red Hall, Pergamon

    November 9, 2020 in Turkey ⋅ ☀️ 19 °C

    One of the few ancient structures remaining from the lower city of Pergamom, now called Bergama. Red Hall is the local name for the building, made of brick.
    The building was originally constructed as a temple to Isis that was later converted to a church. Pergamon is another of the cities mentioned in Revelation, but this building is newer than 1st century when Revelation is usually dated. The biblical text references the throne of Satan which may have been the altar to Zeus.
    The 1st picture looks down on the Red Hall from the road to the acropolis. The next 3 are closer looks at the building, including a newer statue with an Egyptian style. Last is the interior of one of the towers.
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  • Day15

    Temple of Artemis

    November 9, 2020 in Turkey ⋅ ☀️ 11 °C

    One of the 7 wonders of the ancient world, destroyed in the 4th century. Only 1 column remains. Most were reused elsewhere, including in Hagia Sophia (see post from last year). In the 1st picture overlooking part of the temple, you can see 3 religions: The pagan the temple; a mosque up the hill to toward the left; and the 4 pillars at the top right are at the basilica of St. John. The 3rd photo shows the original floor.Read more

  • Day14

    Sirince

    November 8, 2020 in Turkey ⋅ ☀️ 21 °C

    An old town that had been Greek prior to the population exchange in 1923 like Karaköy (see other post). The difference, of course, is that this is still an active village that gives a sense of what such places were/are like--particularly the houses on the hillside.
    The pictures are a couple looks at the houses, a couple street scenes and finally a wine shop. There is a bigger wine industry in Turkey than I expected. After tasting several reds, I can says they weren't bad.
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  • Day14

    Mary Church

    November 8, 2020 in Turkey ⋅ ☀️ 22 °C

    The first church named for the mother of Jesus and the site of the third ecumenical council in 431 AD. The building from that time has been rebuilt, replaced, etc. What remains are the ruins and restorations of later buildings on the site.
    The photos start from the courtyard. Next is a doorway to the church. The next 3 step progressively forward from the doorway, past what appears to be a water bath for ablutions, and then approaching the apse. I'm told the building is about 140 meters long.
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  • Day14

    Ephesus, Lower City

    November 8, 2020 in Turkey ⋅ ☀️ 20 °C

    This is where everyone else lived, worked, played, traded, etc. This area ran from the harbor up to the gate of Herakles (1st picture) which divided the upper and lower cities. Due to sedimentation, the seashore is now 9 km from here. That is why the city was abandoned.
    The 2nd picture is of the facade of the 3rd largest library in antiquity. The gates in the 3rd picture are adjacent to the library and were built by 2 slaves, thanking an emperor for becoming his slaves. (Once a people were conquered, they became slaves, even the wealthy. Hence a couple rich guys said thanks for being taken into the emperor's service.) 4th is the commercial agora in the lower city where all the business, shopping, trading, etc. was done. Adjacent to the lower agora is the street to the harbor that runs to where the harbor used to be. Last is the largest theater in Asia Minor, seating about 25,000.
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