United Kingdom
Robin Hood's Bay

Here you’ll find travel reports about Robin Hood's Bay. Discover travel destinations in the United Kingdom of travelers writing a travel blog on FindPenguins.

5 travelers at this place:

  • Day25

    Cream teas and sore knees

    June 22 in the United Kingdom

    But there was a lot more to our 300+ kilometre journey. Tomorrow we disperse to visit relatives, return home or continue our travels to Sardinia, Shetlands, Norway .......
    We had a rest day today, many of us took the opportunity of the local bus to Whitby. We’d seen it from up on the moors, now a look up close. Another ruined Abbey. Some of the buildings around the abbey were fine, a youth hostel in one.

    We’ve seen Fells and moors, becks and tarns, sheep, dry stonewalls, more sheep, narrow gates, stiles, muddy bogs, baby grouse and Nine Standards, St Sundays, Kidsty Pike. Three national parks, Lakes District, Yorkshire Dales and North York Moors. We’ve seen ruined abbeys and quaint old local churches, stone way-markers and old barns and country pubs. We’ve squeezed into tiny rooms and little attics up steep steps.
    We’ve met fellow walkers and the locals. There were miracles along the way, a pole found, sun glasses replaced, new boots acquired just when needed.

    The views have been spectacular, the moors and fells wild.

    Our group was just the best, full of fun and good cheer. We coped with blisters, sore knees and feet, tired muscles, a thunder storm, not enough toast, and one day, no breakfast at all. We tried lots of local beers, had fish and chips and steak and ale pies.

    This is the last post, happy travels everyone.

    Group Two, Melbourne Womens Walking Club, C2C, 2018
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  • Day24

    Are we there yet?

    June 21 in the United Kingdom

    Yes of course we are!!!
    Our last day was just perfect. We were a little daunted by the distance, about 28 kilometres, the longest yet, but it wasn’t so hard. The weather was sunny but cool, perfect for walking and the route varied.

    We started early and headed for Grosmont where the local station is a out of Harry Potter, old fashioned level crossing gates and a beautiful little station. They still run steam trains on the regular route from here to Whitby sometimes. Today the steam train was in for service so we missed it.
    Then it was up to the penultimate Moor. The route up was on a road but incredibly steep, a grade sign on the way up said 33%. Try riding up that Dianne.

    From Sleights Moor we could look down on Whitby. Then it was down to Little Beck and a walk through Little Beck Woods passing the Hermitage, a large hollowed-out rock, then Falling Foss, a little waterfall and coming out to Midge Hall. Midge Hall is an old game keepers cottage beside the Beck that now runs a little tea room. More cream tea anyone. Luckily the midges weren’t biting.

    Then onto Sneaton Low Moor. We had our lunch stop looking down to Whitby, the North Sea getting closer.

    Finally we were onto the cliff top path, for the last 5 kilometres into Robin Hood’s Bay. So we finished as we started, along a cliff top.

    Robin Hood’s Bay is tucked around a headland so we were almost there before we got a glimpse of it. The end in sight!

    The path brought us to the top of this little holiday village, right past our B&B, so had a quick pit stop, met our host, dropped our bags and headed down the steep narrow road to the “beach”. The tide was out so it wasn’t the most attractive beach but we duly performed the ritual of tossing our pebbles into the North Sea. On the way down we had tied a Coast to Coast tea towel to a walking pole. We lowered the flag on the beach, folded it and gave it to Allison our leader.

    The final ritual is a beer at the Bay Hotel and signing their book. The beer? A Wainwright’s of course.

    We had dinner with Group One and swapped stories about the trials and tribulations of walking the Coast to Coast.

    We now have a rest day before heading off tomorrow. Anyone like to go for a walk? Last post tomorrow.
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  • Day39

    Rieuvaulx

    May 30 in the United Kingdom

    Tuesday 29th May:

    Packed up and left Barbon at around 9.30am. We drove to Rievaulx Terraces and Abbey. The traffic was busy - a combination of Half-term traffic and then through Gargrave where there was a combination of Travellers - very slow moving with their horses and caravans. Coupled with that, there were temporary traffic lights in the other direction! Anyhow we got to the Abbey at Rievaulx at about 12.30 but no parking spaces so we then went and parked at The Terraces and paid to enter. By now, the sun was shining and we enjoyed our picnic lunch sitting on a bench overlooking the Abbey ruins below. The Ionic Temple had a veryinteresting exhibition in the basement (which used to be the kitchen) describing life in the building from the 18th century onwards
    when it was owned and built by the Duncom family who still live on the Duncombe Estanear Helmsley. A member of the National Trust staff opened the upstairs room and we were able to view the magnificent fresco ceiling and the dining table was set out with china as it might have been in the 18th and 19th centuries when the building was used for entertaining the gentry.

    The views of the Abbey from the Terraces are fantastic with gaps in the trees at all the right places. Isabel and Sarah - you will remember when we went to Rievaulx around the time of my 60th birthday.

    We then drove back to Helmsley and to our campsite which was basically a big open field with a few electric hook-ups. Only two other caravanners here! Very friendly owner and good facilities so no complaints. We struck camp quickly as we have now got it down to a fine art. We enjoyed some fine wine and dinner which we had brought from home and heated in the microwave. Then we enjoyed a game of scrabble where M slaughtered P.
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  • Day41

    Robin Hoods Bay

    June 1 in the United Kingdom

    We were woken early again by birdsong but managed to doze off again and slept until 8.30am, which is late when camping! We set off at around 10am and walked to Robin Hoods Bay. We thought it was delightful with lots of little streets and alleyways. We wonder how many actual residents live here - we think the majority of the cottages are holiday lets. We enjoyed some delicious ice-cream down by the harbour and then enjoyed visiting the National Trust shop and an Art Exhibition with watercolours by a local artist. We then wandered back to the campsite via St. Stephen’s Church, Fylingdale with an interesting tall tower. Back at the campsite for lunch and we are now enjoying a lazy afternoon in the sunshine. So that has been our day!Read more

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