Spain
The Alhambra

Here you’ll find travel reports about The Alhambra. Discover travel destinations in Spain of travelers writing a travel blog on FindPenguins.

16 travelers at this place:

  • Day5

    Recuerdos de la Alhambra

    April 19, 2017 in Spain

    Originally constructed by the Moors in 889 AD, this small fortress was built on Roman foundations. Gradually it expanded to become a sumptious palace. Our guide at the Alhambra was a brilliant man named Juan, of German and Spanish descent. He told us about the concept behind the architecture of this Moorish palace. For example there is a sort of hypostyle hall that contains 142 pillars. Muslims consider the number seven perfect. If you add up the digits in 142: 1, 4 and two equal seven. In many of the rooms there are five windows symbolizing the five duties of a good Muslim. The palace was built by king Alfonso the 13th as a permanent seat for the royalty of Spain. However, he died young, and his brother Philip the second moved the Spanish capital to Toledo. As we were boarding the bus we came upon a group of schoolchildren. I asked who wanted to speak English with me. All hands went up they began speaking English and I begin practicing Spanish. After visiting the palace we had a nice dinner a paella and roasted chicken. Finally we drove back to the ship by way of the coast road. Tonight we plan to go to the restaurant downstairs to have a meal of prime rib Yorkshire pudding and a good wine.Read more

  • Day252

    Alhambra

    January 3 in Spain

    Diese Festung ist echt unbeschreiblich. Sie dominiert die ganze Stadt neben der drittgrößten Kathredrale der Welt, welche im Stadtkern liegt. Es gibt verschiedene Aussichtspunkte auf die Festung aber der Beste ist von "San Nicolas" da man dann direkt im Hintergrund auch die weisen Berge der Sierra Nevada sieht. Das ist auch das typische Bild was einem auf den Postkarten entgegenlacht. Es war erstmal ein Akt noch in die Festung zu kommen und diese zu besuchen. Die Haupteingänge boten keine Karten mehr, angeblich waren die Tickets bis M;ärz ausgebucht, und über die offizielle Homepage konnte man mit Glück wohl nachts um 12 Uhr noch welche erlangen. Einmal probiert aber hat nicht funktioniert schreib ich meinem ersten Kontakt den ich bei der Ankunft in Granada am Busterminal kennen gelernt hatte. Pedro konnte uns nur noch ein Paket mit einer Walkingtour durch Albazin und Sacromonte und eben dem Besuch der festung (ohne den berühmten Palast Nazin) für stolze 40Euro verkaufen. Zwei Wochen in Granada ohne die festung zu sehen konnte ich nicht durchgehen lassen und überredete somit Christian dies zu buchen. Bereut haben wir es auch bis heute nicht da mir uns mindestens drei Stunden allein in der festung aufhielten. Diese bot so viel und war echt verschachtelt und leider auch nicht so gut ausgeschildert. Trotzdem ging es vom vorderen Bereich wo der Hauptturm stand neben dem die Soldaten wohnten über eine Art Kolloseum weitere. Letzteres hatte noch zwei Ausstellungen die man sich kostenlos ansehen konnte. In den Palast durften wir ja leider nicht aber liefen dann durch einen tollen großen Garten mit Wasseranlage über die Brücke zum Generalife und dem dazugehörigen Garten, wo damals Obst und Gemüse angebaut wurden. Bei jedem Schritt den wir taten staunten wir über die beeindruckende Konstruktion, stabilen und dicken Mauern und was die Moslems als sie 700- 1400 nach Chr. in Spanien waren schon geleistet haben. Faszinierende Wasser- und Brunnensysteme wurden anhand von Videos erklärt. Die waren echt schon schlaue Füchse und wussten auch, dass hygiene wichtig war um Krankheiten zu vermeiden. Da rätselte ich mal wieder warum aus alten Fehlern oftmals nicht gelernt wurde und die Nachkommen solche Gewohnheiten nicht beibehielten und dadurch mit zig Krankheiten konfrontiert wurden. Damals wie heute ist es wahrscheinlich alles mal wieder leichter gesagt als getan.Read more

  • Day8

    Granada, Spain

    May 19, 2016 in Spain

    This one is long but hopefully worth the read, once again I am way behind on updating the blog but I'm just having way too much fun on the trip. Will be working harder to update more frequently but no promises.

    After taking an afternoon bus leaving Seville,  we arrived in Granada at supper time. During our stay in Granada, we airbnd'ed with a lovely Spanish family.  This was the first time I had used airbnb so I didn't know what to expect, but it was a great first exprience.

    The son, José (a huge Toronto Raptos fan), was the one who organized the airbnb and gave us tons of great local food and drink recommendations.  His mother was incredibly nice and a great cook who spent hours in the kitchen everyday cooking up delicious meals.  Her apple cake she served us for breakfast on the day we were leaving was incredible.

    When we arrived we were craving tapas, and José directed us to his #1 spot located on a street opposite the university. Popular with students for the cheap beer and food, it did not disappoint. $2 for a beer and two big plate of tapas, it was the cheapest meal so far on the trip.  After getting back to the house we did a bit of trip planning and got some sleep for day two.

    Our second day in Granada we explored the old Muslim neighbourhood,  a colourful and vibrant part of the city that stuck out with the narrow winding streets that seemed to be neverending. After making our way out of the neighbourhood we arrived at the river beside the famous Alahambra muslim castle to admire the view. That night we headed to a famous spot at the top of the city that overlooked the entire town. The view was incredible, we went right at sunset and the sun hitting the town and surrounding area was amazing.

    The most unbelievable part of the trip so far (and I'm finishing writing this almost two weeks later), was hiking Los Cahorros. Los Cahorros is a hiking trail in the Sierra Nevada National Park in Spain, taking roughly 4 hours to complete. Accessed from Granada by taking a bus to the nearby village of Monachil, nestled at the edge of the mountains of the national park. We arrived at the village and followed the colourful graffiti signs to the start or the hike.

    I'm glad I was able to record most of the hike on my gopro as it was breathtaking. Following a river most of the hike, you are surrounded by heavy forest with rare breaks of sunny skies. Waterfalls and swinging bridges covering ravines 50 ft below. The path was steep, and some areas you had to grasp iron handles attached to the rock face to shimmy your way across as the path disappeared into the rock wall for multiple sections. Our problems started the signage of the trail, there was none.

    There were signs early on with the name of the hike, but on three different occasions we came to an area with two separate paths to take. With dense forest everywhere, it was hard to tell which way to go. We spent way too much time walking down a path and then hitting a dead end 15 minutes later. At one point "the path" lead to the side of the gate of a hydroelectric dam building. This was one of the scariest parts of the hike as the path was just a rock face to the right and two feet to the left was a 100 ft drop to a raging river. No railings, nothing. After once again hitting a dead end we turned around and ended up at what we thought was the only option at the time (it wasnt), climbing a mountain.

    We met another couple at the base of the path leading up the mountain, they had tried another path opposite the dam one we tried and it was also a dead end. So not wanting to turn back and with no other clear way to go (we thought), we started climbing up the mountain, thinking that it would lead across it and not over it. This unfortunately wasn't the case. We spent roughly two and a half hour climbing this mountain in 30+ degree heat with not nearly enough water. Having to take multiple breaks in shade provided by overbearing rocks, it was a very rough climb up. The path we were on was very wide, enough for a truck to fit on, and as we later discovered this was because the "path" was a service road for the hydroelectric company we saw earlier.

    So our four hour hike through a beautiful national park turned into a seven hour trek up a mountain. When we finally reached the top however I realized it was all worth it. A 360 view of the surrounding area for about 100 miles. The most amazing view I have ever seen. Ben used his phone to calculate that we were at an elevation of 1600m at the top, and we had started the climb at 700m. After taking some pictures and video from the top of the mountain we started our climb down. Unfortunately the path down went over and to the side which took us in the opposite direction of Monachil. We finally reached the end of the service road to a gate reading, "Prohibited area, dangerous", and then the name of the electric company. We had a good laugh when we realized that we were not supposed to climb the mountain at all.

    We started walking down the highway back to town and were lucky to hitchhike a ride back to Monachil with a German couple on vacation. After grabbing some celebratory beers in town we bused back to Granada, showered and went downtown to grab some amazing seafood tapas at Los Diamontes. In the morning Ben and I had breakfast with José's parents, and then took a 10 AM bus to Valencia.

    About a week and half later in Barcelona, I got a tattoo on my arm of the Sierra Nevada mountain range to commemorate the scariest and funnest day of my life.
    Read more

  • Day1688

    Alhambra

    February 21, 2015 in Spain

    The Alhambra and the Albaycín, situated on two adjacent hills, form the medieval part of Granada. To the east of the Alhambra fortress are the magnificent gardens of the Generalife, the former rural residence of the emirs who ruled this part of Spain in the 13th and 14th centuries.
    Info: http://whc.unesco.org/en/list/314
    Video: https://youtu.be/-CGqAiVoXn0

  • Day21

    The Alcazaba

    January 20 in Spain

    The Alcazaba is the 13th century fort at the Alhambra. There were some great views of the city. The old guy was happy that the route home was all down hill, although he still found a few rest stops. I, or he, would be in trouble if he stopped for a pint every time he needed a break! Although I know some of you would think that would be a great idea! In all fairness, we did over 13,000 steps or 9.2 km this day.Read more

  • Day9

    Alcazaba

    October 31, 2015 in Spain

    Nächste Station ist die Alcazaba, die Zitadelle der Alhambra. Die roten Türme der Alcazaba bilden den ältesten Teil der Alhambra. Der Blick zurück zeigt die Warteschlange vor den Palästen, die wir morgens umgehen konnten.
    Mohammed I. baute die drei Türme: den Zerbrochenen Turm, den Ehrenturm und den Wachturm. Natürlich zu Verteidigungszwecken gebaut ermöglichen die drei Türme heute nur noch einen herrlichen Blick ins Land, auf die Stadt Granada, die Kathedrale, und sogar auf die schneebedeckte Sierra Nevada am Horizont.Read more

You might also know this place by the following names:

Alhambra, The Alhambra

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