United States
Echo House (historical)

Here you’ll find travel reports about Echo House (historical). Discover travel destinations in the United States of travelers writing a travel blog on FindPenguins.

9 travelers at this place:

  • Day30

    Mesa Verde National Park, USA

    July 15, 2017 in the United States ⋅

    Comme vous le savez sûrement les indiens d'Amérique vivaient dans des tipis. Donc normalement, contrairement aux peuples d'Amérique du Sud, ils n'ont pas laissé de traces. Mais nous avons découvert qu'il y avait un peuple qui en avait laissé. Ce peuple s'appelait les Anasazis. Nous sommes donc allés voir les ruines de leurs constructions. Les Anasazis ont disparu en l'an 1300 (à peu près). Ils construisaient des tours et des maisons dans des grottes. Ils faisaient de la poterie. Eux n'étaient pas des nomades mais des cultivateurs et éleveurs.

    Amélie

    Hier nous avons fait 4h de voiture pour voir un site Anasazi. Je vais vous parler des constructions impressionnantes que nous avons vues et de leur positionnement. 

    Position : les sites se trouvent dans des grottes de la falaise ou à des endroits plats proches du vide, difficilement accessibles.

    Ventilation : les Anasazi avaient un système de ventilation très perfectionné qui permettait d'évacuer la fumée sans éteindre le feu et de rafraîchir l'intérieur des maisons. Ils creusaient des cheminées verticales (les ventilateurs) d'un mètre de profondeur où l'air s'engouffrait pour ressortir par un trou au fond puis rebondir sur un caillou devant l'entrée du trou (le déflecteur) qui faisait remonter l'air. Le flux d'air croisait la fumée du foyer et amenait cette dernière vers le trou situé au centre du toit.

    Olivier
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  • Day14

    Mesa Verde

    October 21, 2018 in the United States ⋅ ☁️ 15 °C

    The pics of these Pueblos look like they are in miniature but in reality they are quite large buildings where a lot of people lived to help stack rocks on top of one another to create a decent home.
    It makes your mouth water, I got as far as building a rock wall, that felt good and it has a good feel about it too so there is a little bit of envy with people who build a whole village out of that material.
    It’s a good material, you walk on top of this desert mesa to see houses built under massive cliff overhangs and the feeling they give sure beats something made out of treated pine and Gyproc with a vinyl floor.

    The one exception I would make though is to install a few aluminium windows, this is something they should have considered.
    This Mesa is 8,0000ft high, the place is cold enough but in winter it goes under snow so they had to store a lot of food to get them through.
    The places they built, the Pueblos housed themselves, their food stores and the ubiquitous scruffy mutt or two so you could imagine in the depths of winter, with a howling blizzard outside, people shivering, stores dwindling, dogs fighting and then someone complaining about who left the windows open.

    There was a huge population one and a half thousand years ago living on the Mesa and it started out by people digging holes in the ground to house themselves, a bit basic but being in the ground keeps you cool in the short summer and warm during the long winter.
    Eventually the houses rose a little higher and then after that the Pueblonians, (no I’m not having a go that’s what they call them) came along and looked at the enormous caves and thought well, we already have a roof now we just have to fill the bottom in.
    This was radical as I tried to build a house from the roof down once with disastrous results but anyway they really were radical and contemporary people as their ingenuity and art show from examples of beautiful designs on everything from bowls to plaster walls inside the Pueblos.
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  • Day5

    Spruce Tree, Mesa Verde

    August 11, 2015 in the United States ⋅

    Took a 1/4 mile walk down to the Sprice Tree dwelling. This is the best preserved site in the park and its easy to see why as it is nestled in a fertile valley. We were able to go down into a reconstructed Kiva and were surprised at how light it was down there. Fun pre-dinner mini-hike.

You might also know this place by the following names:

Echo House (historical)

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