France
Saint-Laurent-sur-Mer

Here you’ll find travel reports about Saint-Laurent-sur-Mer. Discover travel destinations in France of travelers writing a travel blog on FindPenguins.

18 travelers at this place:

  • Day44

    We were lucky to see a Flowers of Memory ceremony in which French children were putting flowers on the specific graves of servicemen they’d “adopted”. Our national anthem was played on bells—we’d never heard it that way before and it was very moving! The atrocities the French suffered are still remembered, as well as their gratitude to the Allies for their freedom.

    The children also visited a site where the cemetery overlooks a D-Day Landing area at the base of the hill.Read more

  • Day4

    D-Day

    June 16 in France

    This will probably be my favorite day. We are going to the beaches of Normandy, D-Day memorial and the American cemetary.
    But first, we stop for breakfast. It's McDonalds for convenience sake. We got our first look st the kiosks that will put teenage kids out of work in a few years. The problem is, they reduced the counter help and the ones preparing the food.
    We stopped first at the batteries in Lounges-sur-Mur. The 155mm guns had a range of12 miles and wreaked havoc on ships off of Omaha and Gold beaches. June 6, 1944 was their last day of operation since the British obtained the surrender of the guns the morning of June 7th.
    Next we went to, in my estimation, the most significant place in history, short of of Calvary. The American Cemetary and memorial overlooking Omaha beach. It was such a moving experience to stand on the same soil where so many men made the ultimate sacrifice. I was disappointed to find out that we were not able to go down to Omaha beach itself. I overheard that the steps have been closed off for about two years.
    The memorial itself was great. So many informative videos, timelines, and stories of different people.
    And the cemetery itself made it all worth the trip. I can't express it in words.
    We then headed to the village of Sainte-Mere-Eglise. Hours before the main invasion on D-Day, over 13K paratroopers dropped in behind enemy lines. Many were dropped away from their intended drop zones and some of them were in Sainte-Mere-Eglise. German troops were waiting for them and many were killed before they ever hit the ground. One was John Steele, who's parachute was caught on the balusters of the church in the middle of the square. He hung there for several hours pretending to be dead. The church has a mannequin hanging from a parachute to assimilate what it was like.
    The stained glass in the church pays homage to the events of D-Day and to the paratroopers that helped liberate them from Nazi occupation. One of the windows shows Mary surrounded by paratroopers.
    The town itself is more commercialized than what we have seen so far. Lots of little shops selling military memorabilia.
    For lunch, I went into a patisserie and bought a baggett and butter and washed it down with
    water. Kroger's deli doesn't have anything on this place.
    Our last stop of the day was at Pointe du Hoc. A German battery built on high cliffs south of Omaha beach. It is most impressive because it has been more preserved than other sites. The craters from bombs dropped by planes and shells from battleships are deep and to numerous to count. You can tell where some of the heavily fortified bunkers had direct hits and huge blocks of concrete weighing tons were strewn about. It just happened that the battleship USS Texas participated in that attack. The USS Texas currently sits in a Houston ship channel next to the San Jacinto monument, which we visited with the kids and my sister several years ago.
    We had dinner in Bayeux again. I had a pizza. I'm getting better at ordering in French. It is here I am reminded of Europe's aversion to ice. I just don't get it.
    Read more

  • Day44

    Omaha Beach, Normandy

    June 14 in France

    “No mission too difficult. No sacrifice too great. Duty first.” (Quoted from the stone monument on the beach.) This D-Day Landing site is also commemorated by the metal sculpture, “The Braves”. We imagined the hardships the servicemen had landing and making it up the hill behind the beach. Overwhelming how so many lost their lives in the first 24 hours!

    We stopped in the little town, Vierville-sur-Mer, and bought apple cider and calvados, which the business owner makes himself. There were some WWII pictures on the outside walls of the shop. One was of nurses who were shipped in to care for the wounded children, something we don’t usually think about.Read more

  • Day44

    What a beautiful memorial! Excellent sculptures and a circular chapel with a mosaic ceiling. They didn’t start the landscaping until 1956, when all of the soldiers were moved that families wanted in the States instead of here.

  • Day64

    D-day beaches

    September 5, 2017 in France

    Snapshot
    Where - Pegasus Bridge and Normandy beaches
    Weather - fine

    This was Brad's day, visiting the war related sites he has read, and watched movies and documentaries about. First we visited Pegasus Bridge where British glider bourne troops were the first troops to see action on D-day and they had to capture the bridges crossing the Orne River and hold them intact so that the allies coming from the beaches could cross. It was an incredible feat of flying in WWII as troops landed pnly 50m from the bridge and captured in in a matter of minutes. A replacement bridge now crosses the river and the original forms part of the museum outlining the events that occurred in that area. The original was too narrow to cope with modern day traffic, but the replacement looks much the same.

    From there we headed to Point du Hoc which was an area overlooking Omaha and Utah beaches and was occupied by the Germans with large guns. The job of the American Rangers was to capture and disable the guns so that the American troops could land on the beaches without being fired upon (D-day, June 6, 1944). After heavy fighting and the Rangers had to scale the cliffs only to find the large guns they thought were there were actually tree trunks as the Germans had stored the guns as they were afraid they may have been destroyed by the shelling that was happening. As it turned out, the Rangers found the store of guns and managed to disable them by putting thermite grenades in that melted the firing breech. (See, look at how much I have learned about D-day)

    After some lunch overlooking Omaha beach, we went to the American War Cemetery - over 9000 graves of the American soldiers killed during the battle for Normandy. It is located above Omaha beach and all the headstones are arranged in perfectly straight lines , regardless of which direction you look at them. Beautifully maintained.

    We also visited the Airborne Museum which was to do with the 82nd and 101st airborne which landed inland of Utah and Omaha Beaches in the early hours of D-day. One of the paratroopers was entangled on the church tower and was lucky not to be killed by the Germans. They stll have an effigy of him hanging from the church tower in the town of Sainte-Marie-Eglise where the museum is. We did visit another museum, but frankly I have just about exhausted the amount of information I can take in about war and battles etc. that I cannot even remember what it was about.

    These activities were done over 2 days - next we move away from the battlefields and look at some things I am more interested in - next post.
    Read more

  • Day11

    Omaha Beach

    August 6, 2016 in France

    Omaha beach is our pit stop and a perfect starting point for tomorrow as we will take a tour of D Day. We had a picnic on the beach, as the hotel (fortunately for us) restaurant just closed. We had the views you see in movies: miles long sandy beaches, horses riding by and you could hear only the sound of the ocean. Thor was estatic about the ocean and the sand, he just couldn't stop running around. The best of all - sunset was amazing! 😍 What an end to a very colorful day!Read more

  • Day17

    Colleville sur Mer

    August 24 in France

    The American military cemetery located above the East end of Omaha beach. A look at the cemetery and the statue at the entrance. Third is the oval wall listing all MIAs from the battle of Normandy. 4th is the chapel followed by the chapel ceiling. Last is a map of operation Neptune, the part of operation overlord the was the name of the D-Day landings and battle for Normandy it is located in the entry structure to the right.Read more

You might also know this place by the following names:

Saint-Laurent-sur-Mer, 14710

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