Turkmenistan
Ahal

Discover travel destinations of travelers writing a travel journal on FindPenguins.

Top 10 Travel Destinations Ahal

Show all

12 travelers at this place

  • Day8

    A Day in Ashgabat

    May 15, 2019 in Turkmenistan ⋅ ⛅ 17 °C

    Last night I walked around the area near the hotel and finally found a restaurant, on the way home I discovered that there are places I’m not allowed to go and key amongst these is anywhere within a city block of the Presidential Palace (which along with any government building I’m not allowed to photograph). When I got too close the police and security people were very fast to let me know I was not welcome there.
    Today I looked at Ashgabat which everyone is fast to tell me is noted in the Guinness Book of Records as having the most marble clad buildings in the world, along with several other records (they seem a little obsessed with these records).
    I wandered around the remains of Old Nisa then headed off to the Spiritual Mosque, one of the biggest mosques in Central Asia I’m told, then off to the Monument of Neutrality (they are very proud of being a neutral country). I visited another mosque and the Independent Park and spent a while looking through the National History Museum which was good.
    Unbelievably in this city in the desert it rained today quite heavily for a short time.
    Tonight I will play it safe and look for somewhere to eat in the opposite direction to the Presidential Palace
    Read more

  • Day126

    Asghabat

    September 16, 2018 in Turkmenistan ⋅ ☀️ 31 °C

    *Wikipedia:
    Ashgabat: (Turkmen: Aşgabat, pronounced [ɑʃʁɑˈbɑt][2]; Russian: Ашхабад, tr. Ashkhabad, IPA: [ɐʂxɐˈbat]) — named Poltoratsk (Russian: Полтора́цк, IPA: [pəltɐˈratsk]) between 1919 and 1927, is the capital and the largest city of Turkmenistan in Central Asia, situated between the Karakum Desert and the Kopet Dag mountain range. The city was founded in 1881, and made the capital of the Turkmen Soviet Socialist Republic in 1924. Much of the city was destroyed by the 1948 Ashgabat earthquake but has since seen extensive renovation under President Saparmurat Niyazov's urban renewal project. The Karakum Canal runs through the city, carrying waters from the Amu Darya from east to west. Ashgabat is a relatively young city, having been founded in 1881 as a fortification and named after the nearby settlement of Askhabad (see above for the etymology). Located not far from the site of Nisa, the ancient capital of the Parthian Empire, it grew on the ruins of the Silk Road city of Konjikala, first mentioned as a wine-producing village in the 2nd century BC and leveled by an earthquake in the 1st century BC (a precursor of the 1948 Ashgabat earthquake). Konjikala was rebuilt because of its advantageous location on the Silk Road and it flourished until its destruction by Mongols in the 13th century. After that it survived as a small village until Russians took over in the 19th century.

    A part of Persia until the Battle of Geok Tepe, Askhabad was ceded to the Russian Empire under the terms of the Akhal Treaty. Russia developed the area as it was close to the border of British-influenced Persia, and the population grew from 2,500 in 1881 to 19,428 (of whom one third were Persian) in 1897. It was regarded as a pleasant town with European style buildings, shops, and hotels. In 1908, the first Bahá'í House of Worship was built in Askhabat. It was badly damaged in the 1948 earthquake and finally demolished in 1963. The community of the Bahá'í Faith in Turkmenistan was largely based in Ashgabat. Soviet rule was established in Ashgabat in December 1917. However, in July 1918, a coalition of Mensheviks, Social Revolutionaries, and Tsarist former officers of the Imperial Russian Army revolted against the Bolshevik rule emanating from Tashkent and established the Ashkhabad Executive Committee. After receiving some support (but even more promises) from General Malleson, the British withdrew in April 1919 and the Tashkent Soviet resumed control of the city.

    In 1919, the city was renamed Poltoratsk (Полторацк), after Pavel Poltoratskiy, the Chairman of the Soviet of National Economy of the Turkestan Autonomous Soviet Socialist Republic. When the Turkmen SSR was established in 1924, Poltoratsk became its capital. The original name (in the form of "Ashkhabad") was restored in 1927. From this period onward, the city experienced rapid growth and industrialisation, although severely disrupted by a major earthquake on October 6, 1948. An estimated 7.3 on the Richter scale, the earthquake killed 110-176,000 (⅔ of the population of the city), although the official number announced by Soviet news was only 40,000. In July 2003, street names in Ashgabat were replaced by serial numbers except for nine major highways, some named after Saparmurat Niyazov, his father, and his mother. The Presidential Palace Square was designated 2000 to symbolize the beginning of the 21st century. The rest of the streets were assigned larger or smaller four-digit numerical names. Following Niyazov's death in 2006, Soviet-era street names were restored, though in the years since, many of them have been replaced with names honoring Turkmen scholars, poets, military heroes, and figures from art and culture. In 2013, the city was included in the Guinness Book of Records as the world's highest concentration of white marble buildings.

    Editiert am 08.04.2019
    Text von Wolfgang
    ÖFFENTLICH
    Read more

  • Day128

    Start of good news from Dragoman again

    September 18, 2018 in Turkmenistan ⋅ ☀️ 32 °C

    Hi everyone!
    Everything is going to be fine. We are looking forward to meeting you all along the way to Istanbul. We now head on much more comfortable on the last lap to Istanbul.

    ————————————————————————————————————
    E-Mail vom 24.09.2018
    Thanks George

    As Rob was keep telling us we are saisoned travellers. With Intrepid we did about more than 25 trips before they became soft. With Dragoman we did 3 trips and we still recommend you lads. Since those nasty and unpleasant kids left the DRAGOMAN group everyone left on the trip is enjoying the remaining trip to Istanbul. Therefore we have a WIN-WIN Situation. We are greatfull that you refund as the fare and the kitty from Asghabat to Istanbul as well as our deposit on the PANAMERICA. We take that money to travel privately on rather the same track than Rob und Prime and all our buddies, but a bit more in comfort. We have learned one lesson on that fantastic journey: We are to old to travel with groups let’s say more than 90 days. Therefore there is a chance that we join DRAGOMAN in the near future. Let me finish by telling you that Rob and Prim are the best tour guides we ever had and that we enjoined every bit from Ulaanbatoor to Asghabat.

    Wolfgang and Heidi Schneider

    ————————————————————————————————————
    Am 24.09.2018 um 12:36 schrieb Dragoman :
    Dear Wolfgang

    My name is George and I am the managing director of Dragoman. I am very sorry to hear about the events that occurred on your trip. We know that you have travelled with us extensively before and we do value your custom. Events such as this are extremely rare but we do have some strict rules relating to violence on trip. It was not an easy decision but in the end, our operations team decided that they had to make the decision that they made at the time. Again, I am very sorry that you were excluded from the trip but as Heather said we would welcome you back on a Dragoman trip in the future. If you have any further comments, please let me know.

    Best wishes George
    George Durie | Managing and Operations Director

    Editiert am 08.04.2019
    Text von Wolfgang
    ÖFFENTLICH
    Read more

  • Day126

    Ashgabat

    September 16, 2018 in Turkmenistan ⋅ 🌬 29 °C

    *Wikipedia:
    Halk Hakydasy Memorial Complex (People's memory): is a memorial complex to the honor of those killed in battle Geok Tepe, World War II, and the commemoration of the victims of the 1948 Ashgabat earthquake. It is located in the southwestern part of Ashgabat, Turkmenistan.

    Monument of Neutrality (Turkmen: Bitaraplyk arkasy): was a monument located in Ashgabat, Turkmenistan. The three-legged arch, which became known locally as „The Tripod“, was 75 metres (246 ft) tall and was built in 1998 on the orders of Turkmenistan's President Saparmurat Niyazov to commemorate the country's official position of neutrality. It cost $12 million to construct. The monument was topped by a 12-metre (39 ft) tall gold-plated statue of Niyazov which rotated to always face the sun. The arch was located in central Ashgabat where it dominated the skyline, being taller than the nearby Presidential Palace. The statue was illuminated at night. The arch featured a panoramic viewing platform which was a popular attraction for visitors. On 18 January 2010 Niyazov's successor as president, Gurbanguly Berdimuhamedow, signed a decree to begin work on dismantling and moving the arch. There were reports that the arch would be dismantled as early as 2008, but the president did not approve the move until 2010. The dismantling was officially said to be a move to improve urban design in Ashgabat but is seen as part of Berdimuhamedow's campaign to remove the excesses of the personality cult that Niyazov had created in his two decades at the head of one of the world's most totalitarian regimes. Niyazov also named cities and airports after himself, ordered the building of an ice palace and a 40-metre (130 ft) tall pyramid, but the gold-plated statue has been described as the most notorious symbol of his legacy. Berdimuhamedow has replaced the arch with a 95-metre (312 ft) tall „Monument to Neutrality“ which is located in the suburbs. The president appointed Turkish construction firm Polimeks to carry out the demolition of the arch and the construction of the new monument. The removal of Niyazov's golden statue was completed on 26 August 2010, although it then became part of the new Monument to Neutrality. The statue no longer rotates, but the viewing platform is usually open for visitors still. There are elevators inside the „legs“ of the monument.

    Editiert am 08.04.2019
    Text von Wolfgang
    ÖFFENTLICH
    Read more

  • Day128

    Ashgabat

    September 18, 2018 in Turkmenistan ⋅ ☀️ 31 °C

    Wir bewegen uns heute nicht mehr weg vom Swimming Pool. Der hat unglaubliche Dimensionen und NUR Heidi und ich nutzen den. Ashgabat ist eben eine bizarre Stadt aus Marmor geschnitzt - leider ohne Menschen. Wo in China vermutlich auf 5.000 qm bebauter Fläche gefühlte 2.000 Menschen kommen sind es hier gefühlte 0,1 Menschen.

    Unsere Enttäuschung über die „dramatischen Ereignisse“ der letzten 2 Tage weichen langsam der Vorfreude auf 4 Übernachtungen in Baku in Azerbaijan. Morgen um ca. 03:00 a.m. geht unser extrem teurer Flieger (Lufthansa). Da nur Lufthansa direkt von Ashgabat nach Baku fliegt, gibt es leider keine Alternative. Außerdem müssten wir unser e-Visa (230 USD) neu beantragen. Die geplante Überfahrt über die Kaspische See fällt leider wegen der “besonderen Situation” für Heidi und mich aus.

    Videos gibt es erst wieder aus Baku, da Turkmenistan noch konsequenter Google und Co. sperrt als es China tut. Selbst unser VPN bringt hier keine Lösung.

    Editiert am 08.04.2019
    Text von Wolfgang
    ÖFFENTLICH
    Read more

  • Day38

    Auf nach Asgabat

    September 2, 2019 in Turkmenistan ⋅ ☀️ 31 °C

    Der Start Richtung Aşgabat ist dementsprechend spät. Während der Fahrt sehen wir wieder unzählige Polizeikontrollen. Außerdem ist in allen Orten Schulanfang. Mit den ganzen hübschen Schuluniformen sieht das alles sehr festlich aus.

    Um einer Strafe in Aşgabat wegen unseres dreckigen Autos zu entgehen, wollen wir an einen See fahren wo Einheimische ihr Auto waschen. Auf dem Weg dahin kommt uns ein Pickup mit Offiziellen entgegen. Nach einem kurzen Gespräch dürfen wir nur kurz schauen und müssen dann wieder weg fahren. Das Ganze war schon etwas unheimlich und so ganz verstanden haben wir es nicht.

    In der wüstigen Landschaft sehen wir öfters kleine Sandtornados. Einmal sehen wir sogar 3 Stück.

    Während wir die Landschaft beobachteten ließ mich die gute Straße immer schneller fahren. Ein Polizist hatte es verstanden und wartete hinter einer Kuppe auf uns. Er stoppte mich und hielt mir die 106 km/h statt der erlaubten 100 km/h auf der Radarpistole vor die Nase. Was passiert denn jetzt?
    Er sagte daraufhin, dass das ok ist, weil wir Gäste sind. Wir durften also ohne Strafe weiter fahren. Zum Glück! Vorher hatten wir gelesen, dass andere schon wegen 2 km/h schneller angehalten worden.

    Gleich danach hält uns noch ein Polizist an. Was will der denn jetzt noch? Wieder Glück, nach einer freudigen Begrüßung und einem Handschlag dürfen wir weiter fahren.

    Da die Straße gesäumt von Weinanbaugebieten ist, entschließen wir uns direkt ein paar mitzunehmen. Den Preis von 15 Cent für zwei große, frisch geerntete Reben könnte man öfters haben.
    Read more

  • Day38

    In Asgabat muss das Auto blitzen

    September 2, 2019 in Turkmenistan ⋅ ⛅ 28 °C

    Wir freuen uns nach den 33 Polizeikontrollen, die wir heute passiert haben, in Asgabat angekommen zu sein. Sowas haben wir wirklich noch nie erlebt.

    Beim Tanken rechnen wir aus, dass wir nur 7,2l auf 100 km verbraucht haben. Das muss von den geraden Straßen kommen. Wir können uns das jedoch nicht so richtig vorstellen.
    Nach der anschließenden Autowäsche mit Handpolitur sieht unser Auto aus wie neu. Sogar die Reifen sind geschrubbt und glänzen schwarz. So kann es nun nach Aşgabat gehen, ohne eine Strafe zu kassieren. Hier sind dreckige Autos nämlich verboten.
    Read more

  • Day38

    Erster Eindruck von Asgabat

    September 2, 2019 in Turkmenistan ⋅ ⛅ 28 °C

    Uns erwarteten glänzende Asphaltstraßen und eine verrückte Stadt. Überall stehen große weiße Bauwerke und alles sieht sehr sauber aus.
    Die ganze Zeit erleben wir einen Wow-Moment nach dem Anderen und können alles gar nicht so richtig fassen. Die Straßen wirken überdimensioniert, aber dadurch lässt sichs ganz gut fahren.

    Bei einem Einkauf auf einem Basar sehen wir das erste Mal Festpreise für Obst und Gemüse. Wir kaufen eine Melone und danach Limonade auf der "Produkt einer wohlhabenden Epoche eines mächtigen Staates" steht. Wenn man es schon nicht ist, dann muss man es wenigstens schreiben. Die Limo hat leider nicht so wohlhabend geschmeckt...

    Wir mussten auch nochmal etwas Geld tauschen, dieses Mal aber nur 5 Dollar. Wir wollen ja nichts wieder mit ausführen. Das hat alles leider nicht so einfach gemacht. Es hat sich sogar eine Kundin auf dem Basar angeboten zu Tauschen, bei dem geringen Betrag aber Abstand genommen. Nach etwas Umherfragerei sind wir aber trotzdem fündig geworden.
    Read more

  • Day39

    Höhlenbad Köw Ata

    September 3, 2019 in Turkmenistan ⋅ ☀️ 21 °C

    Gleich nach dem Aufstehen gehen wir als Erste zum Bad, es wird extra für uns aufgeschlossen. Köw Ata ist eine unterirdische Höhle in der schwefelreiches Wasser ist. Leider riecht es auch so. Beim Heruntergehen in die düstere Höhle wird die Luft wärmer, was es noch unangenehmer macht. So nehmen wir früh mit den Tauben, die in der Höhle wohnen ein Heilbad. Die Höhle ist so schlecht beleuchtet, dass es echt gruselig ist. Hätten wir bloß unsere Kopflampe mitgenommen. Also sind wir auch ein bisschen froh, als wir wieder frische Luft atmen und die Sonne sehen können.

    Zurück auf dem Weg nach Aşgabat um von da aus zur Grenze zu fahren, sehen wir viele Frauen, die die Straße kehren. Wir fragen uns, ob das normal oder hier eine Strafe ist. Wir haben natürlich auch immer noch Angst vor einer Strafe, weil wir den eingezeichneten Weg verlassen haben.

    An unserem Weg liegt eine riesige Moschee. Die Türkmenbaşy Ruhy Moschee hat Turkmenistan 100 Millionen Dollar gekostet. Hier wird alles vom Militär bewacht. Die übertriebenen Parkhäuser darunter werden nur von den Mitarbeitern benutzt, weil es eigentlich keine Gäste gibt. Trotzdem ist die Infrastruktur auf mehrere tausend Menschen ausgelegt. Auch wenn wir spätestens bei den Toiletten merken, dass nur eine Toilette der 30 Kabinen in Reihe überhaupt geöffnet ist. Irgendwas stimmt hier wohl nicht.
    Read more

  • Day128

    Asghabat to Baku (Azerbaijan)

    September 18, 2018 in Turkmenistan ⋅ ☀️ 28 °C

    18.09.2018
    Wir haben um 13:30 im Hotel ausgeschleckt und verbringen bis 24:00 am Pool. Dann bringt uns ein Taxi zum Flughafen. Am nächsten Tag (19:09.2018) um 01:00 sind wir am Flughafen. Der hat eine hypermoderne Abflughalle mit einer Abfertigungskapazität von „gefühlt München“. Bis morgen Abend gehen hier aber nur 11 Flieger (!!!!). Da schafft Bremen sicher das Dreifache. Und überall grüßt der Präsident (Titelfoto). Der Taxifahrer hatte gar ein goldgerahmtes Portrait des Präsidenten in der Windschutzscheibe. Dieses Mal mit traditioneller weißer Fellmütze sitzend auf einem Pferd. Im Arm hatte er dann noch seinen Hund. Ich glaube es war ein weißer Pudel. Wenn der noch grüßend seine Pfote heben könnte, wäre das Bild perfekt. Bizarr!!!!!!

    Reisedaten: 19. Sep. 2018 - 19. Sep. 2018
    Bestätigung M64JM2 (Lufthansa)
    Buchungsnummer: M64JM2

    05:00 a.m.
    Wir sind im „Grand Hotel“ in Baku angekommen und haben noch 3 Stunden geschlafen. Das Hotel ist ok., liegt im Stadtzentrum und ist preiswert. Und es hat superschnelles WIFI. Meine angestauten YouTube Videos kann ich hier extrem schnell hochladen. Rob berichtet um Mitternacht aus Turkmenbashi, dass sie mit dem Truck seit 5 Stunden auf der Fähre sind und sich seitdem nichts bewegt. Wenn die Fähre irgendwann mal ablegt, braucht sie 18 Stunden bis Baku. Hier sind wir jetzt klar im Vorteil. Der truck musste gestern 2 Tagesetappen an nur einem Tag fahren, um noch eine Chance zu haben eine der extrem unzuverlässigen Fähren zu erreichen.

    ————————————————————————————————————
    e-Mails:
    Thanks Rob
    That‘s great news.
    Yes, yes ...Whisky on the rocks for everyone will be great. The chocolate was great according to Heidi. We will be flighing tonight.

    Am 18.09.2018 um 15:28 schrieb Robert Dunn :
    Yes for sure. We are crossing the Caspian tonight. Will be in Baku tomorrow eve. Shall i put the whiskey on ice? Enjoy your last evening. Did Heidi enjoy the chocolates?

    On Tue, 18 Sep 2018, 19:02 Ewald W. Schneider, wrote:
    Hi Rob
    hi Prim
    We are both looking forward to see you all along the way to Istanbul in privat

    ————————————————————————————————————
    Yes Jane
    We are happy to see all of you in Baku. We are comforting each other as much as possible. Heidi loved the chocolate and the grapes as we both have to gain wait.
    Cheers
    Mr. Wulf
    ————————————————————————————————————

    Am 18.09.2018 um 13:36 schrieb Primrose Miller :
    Wolf!!!! Heidi Hiii!!
    We miss you both!! We are crossing on the ferry tonight so will be in Baku tomorrow.
    Very much looking forward to seeing you too!! Rob asks if Heidi enjoyed her chocolates and grapes?
    Lots of love to you Both!!

    ————————————————————————————————————

    Fazit des Draxit:
    Nach einigen Tagen der Ungewissheit haben wir von DRAGOMAN die schriftliche Zusage erhalten, dass sie uns den gesamten Preis für die Restreise bis nach Istanbul einschließlich Kitty erstatten werden. Von diesem Geld haben wir dann die Restreise bis nach Istanbul in etwa finanzieren können. Die drei grauenhaften Engländer haben in Ashgabat fluchtartig die Gruppe verlassen. Sie hatten mit ihrer Aktion vermutlich erreichen wollen, dass ihnen DRAGOMAN den Ausstieg zumindest teilweise finanzieren würde. Das ist glücklicherweise nicht geschehen. Die Gruppe war anschließend glücklich die drei Typen endlich los zu sein; auch wenn das alles zu unseren Lasten geschehen ist. Am Ende als wir in Istanbul angekommen waren, hatten wir mehr von Georgien gesehen, als wenn wir weiter mit DRAGOMAN gefahren wären. Von der Türkei haben wir dagegen leider weniger gesehen, als wenn wir weiter mit DRAGOMAN gefahren wären.

    Editiert am 08.04.2019
    Text von Wolfgang
    ÖFFENTLICH
    Read more

You might also know this place by the following names:

Ahal, Ahal welaýaty, Wilayah Ahal, Ahal vilayəti, Ахал, Província dAhal, Provinco Ahal, Provincia de Ahal, Ahali vilajett, استان آخال, Ahalin maakunta, आख़ाल प्रान्त, Ահալի վելայաթ, Provinsi Ahal, Provincia di Ahal, アハル州, ახალის ველაიათი, 아할 주, Ahalo velajatas, Ахал муж, Wilajet achalski, صوبہ اخال, Provincia Ahal, Ахалский велаят, Ahal Province, Achal, Вилояти Аҳал, Ahal vilayeti, Ахалський велаят, Ahal viloyati, 阿哈爾州

Join us:

FindPenguins for iOSFindPenguins for Android

Sign up now