India
Sāvitri Pahār

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    • Day38

      Auf den Savitri Pahar zum Sonnenaufgang

      October 20 in India ⋅ 🌙 20 °C

      Wir sind heute früh auf. Nach einer Stunde Fußmarsch und unzähligen Stufen erreichen wir um kurz vor 6 den Gipfel Savitri Pahar. Von hier genießen wir den Sonnenaufgang und schauen den Affen beim klettern zu.Read more

      Traveler

      Ihr. seid ja mega aktiv und sammelt damit tolle Eindrücke und Erlebnisse auf euren Trips durch die fernöstlichen Kulturen. Und wir dürfen das Dank eurer tollen Bilder und interessanten Reiseberichten sehr nah miterleben - danke! 🤩

      10/21/22Reply
      Traveler

      💯❤️

      10/21/22Reply
      Traveler

      Wow. Mega. Echt tolle Bilder.

      10/21/22Reply
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    • Day50

      Pushkar and the infamous Delhi Belly

      February 24, 2020 in India ⋅ ☀️ 24 °C

      I didn’t get much sleep last night, it was very cold and I was unprepared for that and the India guys who had the beds around us were (of course) loud and obnoxious throughout the night. However, the train got to Ajmer 35 minutes early (without any notification). It was the classic case of get off then figure it out. We’d heard about a bus to Pushkar but had no idea where it went from. With various Tuktuk drivers offering us lifts costing the equivalent of two nights’ accommodation, we decided to walk the 2km to the bus station - quite nice after being cooped up on the train for 6 hours. We got to the bus station and asked where the bus to Pushkar was, one person told us it was the one leaving right now but we didn’t trust it so I went to the station master and asked...bus 22 it was then. We got on and waited for a driver to turn up. Meanwhile we tried to listen in on conversations to confirm of this was to Pushkar. After I demolished half my Oreos which I hadn’t eaten as I felt awful the previous night, we were on our way.

      The bus journey was only 14km and only cost us the equivalent of 16pence each and it seemed to stop for people wherever they wanted which was perfect as our hostel was a little walk from the Pushkar bus station. I got up and motioned to the conductor that we wanted to get off, after a while she blew her whistle and we were dropped just 500m from the hostel...result! We got there, groggy and in desperate need of sleep and as it was only 07:30 and check in was at 13:00 we headed to the rooftop in search of a makeshift bed for a few hours. In truth, we both slept until midday and we only woke because the sun started to bear down on us! We got up, checked in and then set out to have a look at Pushkar. I was still feeling pretty terrible with very frequent trips to the toilet, so we packed the loo roll just in case - the joys of India. On the way to town was a thali place we’d been recommended, only 50 rupees. Tom grabbed one and I just had our bottle of water. It was a massive thali, and obviously amazing value. I grabbed some bananas for the walk round town and we made our way to Pushkar Lake, or the holy lake.

      Pushkar is a prominent pilgrimage town where devout Hindus should visit at least once in their lifetime. We were both pleasantly surprised by this place, with a population of only 21,000 it was by far the smallest place we’d been in India, and it was refreshingly quiet and lacked the constant hassling we got in Mumbai and Udaipur. We chilled round the lake, which is a strict no shoes or socks zone - although cows can walk around all day and shit where they like. The town of Pushkar curls around the holy lake, which was said to have appeared when Brahma dropped a lotus flower...not sure if we believed that but it was pretty nonetheless. We found a shaded spot where there were a few pool with kids playing and the locals having their daily rituals. We had a few people come up to us and try some sort of scam where they give you a petal and then ask for money, and we also had a guy who started saying over and over “I am Indian” and then he stood right in front of me and blocked my view. Even though the town was clean for India, we still watched in awe as people came down to the lake, had a bath and then filled up their water bottles for later. From where we were sat we could see that the water wasn’t clear...these guys must have stomachs of steel!! After a while we went for a little walk and checked out some of the market street and a few other places we’d been recommended including a pizzeria and a falafel place. After seeing the pizza place, we’d decided there and then that we’d treat ourselves tonight and go for it! As we were both up for taking it easy, we headed back to the hostel as we knew they had hot water showers - a rarity in all of India it seems.

      On the way back the sudden urge to go to the toilet hit me in the worst way...I took a gamble on a fart and realised I needed to get to a western toilet in the next two minutes or I’d have to resort to the street! I grabbed the bag off Tom, which had to loo roll in, and ran back to the hostel and made it just in time. We showered and watched the sunset from our roof terrace and then headed back into town for our first western meal since leaving home. The pizza place was a little haven from the craziness of India...no roadside eating tonight, it was a beautiful courtyard with mellow music and a cool buzz about it. We ordered a good old margarita and a pepper onion pizza. We were even more excited when the table next to us had a pizza arrive...it looked bloody good. Ours arrived and we halved both to make two 50:50 pizzas and we savoured every mouthful...not much more can be said about this except that we splashed out and it only cost £3 each! Being very satisfied, we ambled back to the hostel, me stepping in a huge cow poo on the way back, chilled on the rooftop listening to music and writing the blog before hitting the extremely comfy beds for a well deserved rest, provided the Indian wedding happening nearby didn’t keep us up.
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      Traveler

      So care free lovely -x

      3/11/20Reply
      Traveler

      Beautiful xx

      3/11/20Reply
      Traveler

      Stunning bath!!

      3/11/20Reply
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    • Day52

      Pushkar day #3

      February 26, 2020 in India ⋅ ☀️ 28 °C

      Tom woke up at around 830 and I was still asleep so Very kindly he left me to it whilst I lazed in my bed for a little while...the beds were almost too comfy to leave. After a while I got up, used the hot showers and we chilled out in the room and then on the balcony, looking into our route for Nepal and booking some bits for India too. The music in the streets weals certainly still going, in fact this morning it was directly below our hostel. It was around 13:30 before we actually left the hostel today but, you certainly need those days when you’re travelling to just rest up a bit, especially when you’re not feeling too well.

      We went to the 50 rupee thali place for lunch, but again I couldn’t eat a thing so sat and watched Tom devour his meal. Tom very kindly gave me a scrap of chapati and some plain rice - making me feel like a stray dog - but this was all I could stomach. We wandered to the other side of the lake and came across a troop of big monkeys going about their business. We arrived to where the Brahma temple was - the only one in the world apparently. It was a big pink temple but no photos were allowed inside and we also had to leave our bags in a storage locker for free. It was pretty, but not as spectacular as the ones in Hampi or even on our day exploring north it Udaipur, so we left pretty quick and decided we’d go and find a bum bag to hold our things for during the Holi festivities. We looked around with some guy insisting his bag was real Diesel branded but I’m pretty sure diesel was spelt wrong. We eventually found one which would do the job and bartered it down to 300 rupees. I was still feeling pretty awful, so we headed back via the Sikh Temple where we had to wear funny little headscarves before going in. It was dead quiet and actually a beautiful temple made of white marble. We went back for some more chill time on our beautiful rooftop and we looked further into the Nepal route.

      We headed back out to town for dinner and I grabbed myself another falafel wrap as I was still not too keen on curry, but it still wouldn’t fix me!! Tom grabbed yet another thali on the way back to the hostel and we just got ourselves a hot shower and an early night again - these beds were amazing!!!
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      Traveler

      Lovely!

      3/11/20Reply
      Traveler

      Tom x!

      3/11/20Reply
      Traveler

      Oh George you poor thing xxx plain rice is the thing XX

      3/11/20Reply
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    • Day39

      Hier lässt es sich aushalten...

      October 21 in India ⋅ ☀️ 24 °C

      Da Pushkar dem Schöpfergott Brahma geweiht ist, sind alle Speisen innerhalb der Stadtgrenzen streng vegetarisch: Fleisch, Eier und Alkohol sind verpönt – wobei uns zumindest Bier in fast jedem Lokal, abseits der Getränkekarte, angeboten wird. Außerdem ist die Kleinstadt auf viele Touristen, vor allem Israelis eingestellt. Warum genau so viele Israelis hierher kommen, habe ich noch nicht verstanden. Dank ihnen gibt es aber oftmals israelische Gerichte, wie Hummus oder Shakshuka auf der Speisekarte. In vielen Cafés und Restaurants gibt es aber auch noch weitere leckere Alternativen zur indischen Kost.

      Besonders gut gefallen uns hier auch unsere Unterkünfte. Sowohl das Inn Seventh Heaven im Zentrum als auch das Schwesterhotel DIA Homestay etwas außerhalb, haben Flair, schöne Zimmer, einladende Aufenthaltsbereiche, wahnsinnig hilfsbereites Personal und bieten tolle Ausblicke. Im Seventh Heaven steht außerdem ein schöner Massageraum bereit, indem wir uns eine ayurvedische Massage gönnen. Zum Frühstück gibt es auch endlich Mal was anderes als Marmeladentoast und Cornflakes als nicht-indische Frühstücksvariante.

      Restaurantempfehlungen:
      - The Sixth Sense im Seventh Heaven
      - Laura's Café mit tollem Seeblick
      - The Funkey Monkey
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      Traveler

      Hier kann man 's wirklich aushalten 😀👍

      10/23/22Reply
       
    • Day13

      פושקר - סיור בשוק

      October 10 in India ⋅ ⛅ 23 °C

      אחרי ארוחת בוקר במלון (Brahma Horizon Hotel), שהיתה מאד טובה הלכנו רגלית לכיוון השוק.

      עברנו דרך מקדש סיקי ומקדש הינדי. בשניהם הצילום היה אסור, אז דילגנו עליהם.

      השוק הוא שוק רגיל שמוכרים בו כל מה שתייר מחפש, החל מאוכל ישראלי , דרך פריטי לבוש, צמידים ותכשיטים וכלה בדוכני שתיה טבעית.
      בשוק יש הרגשה טובה ונעימה. המוכרים לא מנסים לשכנע אותך לבוא אליך.
      חווית הקנייה היא ממש טובה וקנינו שם פריטים רבים - היו גם כאלה שקנינו לפי דרישה מהבית. בתמונות ניתן לראות תמונות של מוכרים שקנינתי מהם גם בטיול הקודם (לפני כ-3 שנים).

      שתיתי מיץ מקל מתוק (בסרטון ניתן לראות איך מכינים).

      בתחילת השוק (כשמגיעים מהאיזור הישראלי) יושבת אישה עם שני בנות (כנראה הבנות שלה) ומוכרת תכשיטים.
      התכשיטים לא יפים ואין לה מבחר גדול - אבל האישה והבנות נראות וואו.
      האישה לא מוכנה שיצלמו אותה אלא אם כן תקנו משהו.

      את ארוחת הצהריים אכלנו במסעדת Mali Thali שהישיבה היא על מזרונים.
      הרבה חבר'ה ישראלים ואפילו הביאו לנו תפריט בעברית.

      עדכון: עקב בעייה של העלאת קבצים גדולים - הסרטון יעלה בהמשך.
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      תלכו לחתונה הודית [הממליץ]

      10/11/22Reply
      Traveler

      אתה יודע איפה יש?

      10/11/22Reply

      מי גונב לי את השם ? [הממליץ המקורי]

      10/11/22Reply
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    • Day37

      Kamelsafari in Pushkar

      October 19 in India ⋅ ☀️ 31 °C

      Zum Sonnenuntergang haben wir heute Abend eine Kamelsafari gebucht. Gegen halb 5 werden wir am Hotel abgeholt. Auf einer Honda Hero - dieses Modell machen gefühlt 90 % der Motorräder in Indien aus - fahren wir zu dritt zum Stadtrand. Hier warten schon die gesattelten Kamela auf uns. Gemeinsam mit unseren Kamelführern geht's in Schrittgeschwindigkeit in die überschaubare Wüste von Pushkar. Von den beiden erfahren wir, dass hier in zwei Wochen die Pushkar Mela - die größte Kamelmesse der Welt - stattfindet. Nach gut einer Stunde Kamelritt erreichen wir den Sunset-Point. Während wir den Sonnenuntergang verfolgen genießen wir noch einen Masala Chai. Dann geht's auf direktem Weg - inzwischen ist es auch schon dunkel - wieder zurück.

      Die Kamelsafari hat echt Spaß gemacht. Ganz so idyllisch, wie ich es mir vorgestellt habe, war der Wüstentripp aber leider nicht. Gerade am Anfang der Strecke begegnet uns sehr viel Müll. Sowohl Kleinmengen wild verstreut aber auch ganze Berge davon. Der immer präsente Müll gehört leider zu Indien. Außerdem werden Kamelsafaris - egal ob Ausritt oder mit Wagen - von den motorisierten Jepps und Quads verdrängt, die deutlich mehr Lärm und Müll mitbringen.
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      Traveler

      die Kamele sehen ziemlich hochnäsig aus.

      10/21/22Reply
       
    • Day34

      Pushkar not so bad

      December 16, 2019 in India ⋅ ☀️ 17 °C

      So as I said in the previous post we decided to stay a bit longer. Pushkar is actually quite beautiful when it cleared up and we got some sun. We met a lot of travelers here too which was cool. Still we wouldn't go back here unless we wanted to buy hippie clothes for really cheap. It was too western orientated like all the shops were selling these hippie clothes which you never see any Indian person in. And the streets are subsequently filled with white people hahaha. So it felts more like being at a psy trance festival (as psy trance was also playing in many shops and restaurants) not a bad thing, just not what we were looking for in India lol.Read more

      Traveler

      Nona would be in HEAVEN!

      12/21/19Reply
      Traveler

      I love the photo from the front of the hotel!

      12/21/19Reply
      Traveler

      I don't really get this photo. What's going on? Is that a real cow or a statue?

      12/21/19Reply
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    • Day48

      Pushkar - Stadt der Tempel

      October 18 in India ⋅ ☀️ 33 °C

      Es gibt 3 Hauptgründe nach Indien zu reisen. Kultur, Tradition und Essen. Eigentlich reisen wir nach Pushkar weil es hier schöne Hemden geben soll. Bei unserem Stadtrundgang mit Manish lernen wir, dass Pushkar eine Pilgerstadt ist und das es uns an einen der heiligsten Orte in Indien verschlagen hat. Das ist schon ein bisschen magisch. Jeder Hindu sollte mindestens einmal im Leben hier gewesen sein. Gemäß Manishs Erzählungen gibt es 68 heilige Plätze in Indien, die Stadt Pushkar ist eine davon. Die Stadt schlängelt sich um einen heiligen See, und soll entstanden sein, als der Gott Brahma eine Loutusblüte hier abgelegt hat. Am See gibt es 52 Bade Ghats. Ghats sind wichtige Stellen für die rituellen Waschungen der Hindus um sich eben reinzuwaschen und um Gesundheit für die Familien zu erbitten. Ebenso wird ein Teil der Asche der Toten dem See übergeben, dazu Wünsche und Segen. So soll sich zum Beispiel auch die Asche von Gandhi im Pushkar See befinden. Gut, wir gehen trotzdem nicht baden. Wir laufen stattdessen barfuß - weil heilig - mit Manish einmal um den gesamten See, besuchen Tempel um Tempel und bekommen unendlich viel Input zum Hinduismus. Freundlicher Weise werden wir von den Badegästen und Manish aber auch gewarnt, wenn irgendwo Schlangen zugegen sind, die gelangen nämlich von den Bergen in den See. Bei den Kühen und dazugehörigen Kuhfladen müssen wir jedoch selbst aufpassen. Langsam wächst in mir auch ein kleiner Hindu. Wäre gelogen, wenn ich sagen würde, dass mich die Idee zu Religion & Tradition kalt lassen würde. Das Ganze krönt zum Ende der Tour die Teilnahme an einer spirituellen Zeremonie. Wir werden am Brahma Ghat gesegnet. Mit heiligem Wasser aus dem See auf Stirn, Kinn und Schulter, dazu gibt es ein rotes Pünktchen auf die Stirn - unser drittes Auge - und ein Familienband wird sorgfältig um unser Handgelenk gelegt. Der Brahmane spricht uns Wünsche und seinen Segen für Gesundheit und ein glückliches Leben in Hindi aus und ich bekomme Gänsehaut. Wenn mir jetzt noch einer sagen würde, dass ich in den See springen soll, würde ich es wahrscheinlich in genau diesem Moment auch tun und mich zu Gandhi begeben. Stattdessen übergeben wir unsere Wünsche jedoch nur in Form von Blumen, Reis und buntem Farbpulver dem See. Wow. Krasse Erfahrung. Brauche jetzt erstmal ein Malpua Snack von der Straße. Viel Zeit zum Verdauen des Snacks und der ganzen Eindrücke bleibt jedoch nicht, denn mit dem Moped (beladen mit 3 Personen) geht es direkt weiter zum indischen Kochkurs, den ich mir so gewünscht habe. Wir fahren zur Familie unseres Hotelkochs und basteln hoch professionell an Dhal, Palak Paneer, Chala Masala, Chiabati, Paratha, Reispudding und Chai Masala. Es sei euch gesagt: Ich habe alles mitgeschrieben und wenn ich wieder zu Hause bin, seid ihr meine Versuchkaninchen! 🐇 Wir vernaschen unsere Köstlichkeiten im Schlafzimmer der Familie und schwatzen zu Themen wie Schule, Ferien, Festlichkeiten und Träumen. Am Ende möchte die Tochter meine Hände mit Henna bemalen. Ich freue mich riesig über dieses persönliche Andenken und gucke der kleinen Künstlerin gespannt zu. Auf dem Weg zurück ins Hotel geht es mit dem Moped durch Ziegenherden, vorbei an Affen auf Kühen, durch den Lärm und den Dreck der Straßen. Erstaunlicherweise gewöhnt man sich recht schnell daran und so verrückt und vielleicht auch schlimm wie am Anfang, finden wir es gar nicht mehr. Kinder kommen auf uns zugerannt und wollen mir die Hände geben...aber ich kann nicht, wegen dem Henna. Sooo viele Eindrücke. Könnte noch nen Kilometer weiteren Text verfassen, weil soviel Wunderbares und Einmaliges umrahmt von krasser bis grenzwertiger Umgebungen auf einen einprasselt. Zurück im Hotel buchen wir unseren Zug für morgen nach Jaipur und freuen uns auf das nächste Indienabenteuer.

      P.S. Wir haben keine Hemden gekauft ;)
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    • Day51

      Pushkar lake and Indian Wedding!

      February 25, 2020 in India ⋅ ☀️ 26 °C

      Tom has said that he woke up at 8am, and I was still asleep...the bed was so comfy and warm that he decided to try and get some more sleep as Wed been going non stop for weeks and needed to reset! He woke back up at 9 and I still wasn’t awake, this is how Tom knew I was ill...as I was always awake before him! I eventually surfaced just after 11 and found Tom chilling on the rooftop. He recommended that we go out and get some watermelon, apparently a good snack if you have diarrhoea...? So we did just that, on our way into town an old hippie Indian guy who was chilling out at the blue temple where the hippie men hung out offered Tom a drag of his joint...we didn’t have a clue what he was smoking, but certainly didn’t want to try it! We got into town and paid 100 rupees for a full watermelon, we found a spot around the lake where we weren’t being pestered by the scammer trying to “gift” us with a flower and a blessing and then demand money from us...nor were we being shouted at for carrying our shoes and we ate the entire watermelon!

      We then walked around the lake anti-clockwise, past numerous people bathing in the holy lake and were constantly being hassled for carrying our shoes. We chilled out at our favourite spot, just outside one of the Ghats on the steps and took in the surroundings whilst talking about random things including the purposes of fizzy water...why would you drink fizzy water!? We were obviously going crazy or running out of things to talk about. We made our way back to the hostel for some more chill out time before we made our way to the sunset viewpoint. We had agreed that we would meet the German guy (from Konstanz) from our hostel, Joel at the top of the viewpoint as he was going to get food first. We made our way up the tracks, walking past a woman who was suspiciously cleaning something up on one of the rocks...we come to the conclusion she had taken a shit at the side of the tracks and was now desperately trying to clean it up.

      We continued and before long we got to the top of the viewpoint, which was a temple and of course you weren’t allowed shoes inside...however it looked like an awful temple it was really the view you come here for...we decided to keep our shoes on and just perch on a nearby rock to enjoy the sunset. We were joined by Joel, we chatted and enjoyed a nice sunset. Before it got dark we made our way into the town where George and I grabbed a famous Pushkar falafel from lafa falafel, the spot in Pushkar where 3 falafel stores sit adjacent to one another and customers enjoy their food on-street-seating. It was pretty good, nothing on the ones we had in the Philippines though! We thought we’d make our way back to the hostel for a chilled night.....

      Upon arriving back at the hostel the guy behind the check-in desk said to Joel he had good and bad news. The bad news was that his washing wasn’t going to be done in time for his checkout because the man who does the laundry is getting married today. However the good news was that by means of an apology he was invited to his wedding. Seems like a pretty good apology to us! He proceeded to say the three of us were invited and even showed us the very official invitation card he had received. Tom was 100% up for it as he’s always wanted to attend an Indian wedding and even more so here in India. It took some convincing for me to be up for it with my current stomach situation but eventually I agreed to join.

      We changed into some jeans, still with my scruffy jumper on and got into the party TukTuk that was waiting for us outside the hostel. The wedding was in Ajmer, the town that we arrived into on the train and the “15 minute drive” turned into a 45 minute drive, hanging onto the back of the TukTuk as the driver (who was high) drove far too quickly, meandering through traffic and not slowing down for speed bumps. However, we got to talk to the guys who were working at the hostel, Amit and Micky and they were both really nice guys! Eventually we arrived at the venue, after checking it was the right wedding as so many weddings were taking place today. The entrance was very grand and I could feel 1,000 eyes looking at us as we entered the venue. However, everyone was warm and welcoming to us. Handshake and handshake and selfie after selfie we made our way round the wedding, enjoying the fantastic food that was on offer. I had a paneer curry, vegetable kofta curry, biriyani with freshly made chipatis and naan breads. As I was eating the delicious food, taking in my surroundings it hit me that it was a much more sophisticated than I was expecting. People were stood around chatting and enjoying their food, it felt more like a get together, not a wedding. After finishing the food I dumped my plate into one of the many huge buckets that had been put out to collect cutlery and we made our way over to meet the bride and the groom. I had spoken to Micky on the way and he told me that this was an arranged marriage by their parents, who also paid for this occasion...on average about 1 million Indian rupees, or £10,000 for a wedding of this scale. We waited in a queue to meet the bride and groom, got a picture with them, said our congratulations, got a sweet as hell coffee (Tom got 3 for him and had mine too!) and were back in the TukTuk on our way back to the hostel. The journey back was equally rough but we got back at around 11:30, where we made my way straight to bed having ticked off one more thing from the bucket list.
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      Traveler

      Yum -reeee hydrate xx

      3/11/20Reply
      Traveler

      So stunning -so Indiaxx

      3/11/20Reply
      Traveler

      Hello George! Xxx⭐️😘

      3/11/20Reply
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    • Day38

      Wir erkunden Pushkar

      October 20 in India ⋅ ☀️ 30 °C

      Brahma, ist neben Vishnu und Shiva einer der drei wichtigen Hindu-Göttern. Obwohl Brahma der Schöpfer des Universums ist, steht der einzige Tempel der Brahma geweiht ist in Pushkar. Dieser Ort ist daher für Hindus heilig und eine Pilgerstätte.

      Nach der Überlieferung wurde Pushkar geboren, als der Schöpfergott Brahma eine Lotusblüte (pushpa), die er in seinen Händen (kar) hielt, fallen ließ. An den drei Stellen, wo die Lotusblätter zu Boden fielen, entsprang wundersamerweise mitten in der Wüste Wasser, das drei kleine blaue Seen bildete. Der Legende nach hat Brahma außerdem das wunderschöne einheimische Mädchen Gayatri geheiratet, da er eine Gehmahlin zur Vollendung eines Rituals benötigte und seine erste Frau Savitri unzulänglich war. Als Savitri davon erfuhr, eilte sie nach Pushkar und verfluchte Brahma, dass er nirgendwo sonst verehrt und Pushkar der einzige Ort sein würde, an dem es einen ihm gewidmeten Tempel geben würde.
      Heute liegen an den gegenüberliegenden Enden von Pushkar zwei Hügel mit jeweils einem Tempel. Der höhere ist Savitri gewidmet - hier waren wir für den Sonnenaufgang, während der kleinere Gayatri gewidmet ist.

      Diese und andere spannende Hintergrundgeschichten zu Pushkar, dem Hinduismus und der indischen Kultur im allgemeinen lernen wir von unserem Guide Manish (@ThePushkarRoute) bei einer empfehlenswerten Stadtführung kennen.
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      Traveler

      Hier sind wohl die Kühe die Chefin 🐂

      10/23/22Reply
       

    You might also know this place by the following names:

    Sāvitri Pahār, Savitri Pahar

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