India
Rajasthan

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  • Day52

    Pushkar day #3

    February 26, 2020 in India ⋅ ☀️ 28 °C

    Tom woke up at around 830 and I was still asleep so Very kindly he left me to it whilst I lazed in my bed for a little while...the beds were almost too comfy to leave. After a while I got up, used the hot showers and we chilled out in the room and then on the balcony, looking into our route for Nepal and booking some bits for India too. The music in the streets weals certainly still going, in fact this morning it was directly below our hostel. It was around 13:30 before we actually left the hostel today but, you certainly need those days when you’re travelling to just rest up a bit, especially when you’re not feeling too well.

    We went to the 50 rupee thali place for lunch, but again I couldn’t eat a thing so sat and watched Tom devour his meal. Tom very kindly gave me a scrap of chapati and some plain rice - making me feel like a stray dog - but this was all I could stomach. We wandered to the other side of the lake and came across a troop of big monkeys going about their business. We arrived to where the Brahma temple was - the only one in the world apparently. It was a big pink temple but no photos were allowed inside and we also had to leave our bags in a storage locker for free. It was pretty, but not as spectacular as the ones in Hampi or even on our day exploring north it Udaipur, so we left pretty quick and decided we’d go and find a bum bag to hold our things for during the Holi festivities. We looked around with some guy insisting his bag was real Diesel branded but I’m pretty sure diesel was spelt wrong. We eventually found one which would do the job and bartered it down to 300 rupees. I was still feeling pretty awful, so we headed back via the Sikh Temple where we had to wear funny little headscarves before going in. It was dead quiet and actually a beautiful temple made of white marble. We went back for some more chill time on our beautiful rooftop and we looked further into the Nepal route.

    We headed back out to town for dinner and I grabbed myself another falafel wrap as I was still not too keen on curry, but it still wouldn’t fix me!! Tom grabbed yet another thali on the way back to the hostel and we just got ourselves a hot shower and an early night again - these beds were amazing!!!
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    Sally-Anne Marsland

    Lovely!

    3/11/20Reply
    Sally-Anne Marsland

    Tom x!

    3/11/20Reply
    Sally-Anne Marsland

    Oh George you poor thing xxx plain rice is the thing XX

    3/11/20Reply
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  • Day51

    Pushkar lake and Indian Wedding!

    February 25, 2020 in India ⋅ ☀️ 26 °C

    Tom has said that he woke up at 8am, and I was still asleep...the bed was so comfy and warm that he decided to try and get some more sleep as Wed been going non stop for weeks and needed to reset! He woke back up at 9 and I still wasn’t awake, this is how Tom knew I was ill...as I was always awake before him! I eventually surfaced just after 11 and found Tom chilling on the rooftop. He recommended that we go out and get some watermelon, apparently a good snack if you have diarrhoea...? So we did just that, on our way into town an old hippie Indian guy who was chilling out at the blue temple where the hippie men hung out offered Tom a drag of his joint...we didn’t have a clue what he was smoking, but certainly didn’t want to try it! We got into town and paid 100 rupees for a full watermelon, we found a spot around the lake where we weren’t being pestered by the scammer trying to “gift” us with a flower and a blessing and then demand money from us...nor were we being shouted at for carrying our shoes and we ate the entire watermelon!

    We then walked around the lake anti-clockwise, past numerous people bathing in the holy lake and were constantly being hassled for carrying our shoes. We chilled out at our favourite spot, just outside one of the Ghats on the steps and took in the surroundings whilst talking about random things including the purposes of fizzy water...why would you drink fizzy water!? We were obviously going crazy or running out of things to talk about. We made our way back to the hostel for some more chill out time before we made our way to the sunset viewpoint. We had agreed that we would meet the German guy (from Konstanz) from our hostel, Joel at the top of the viewpoint as he was going to get food first. We made our way up the tracks, walking past a woman who was suspiciously cleaning something up on one of the rocks...we come to the conclusion she had taken a shit at the side of the tracks and was now desperately trying to clean it up.

    We continued and before long we got to the top of the viewpoint, which was a temple and of course you weren’t allowed shoes inside...however it looked like an awful temple it was really the view you come here for...we decided to keep our shoes on and just perch on a nearby rock to enjoy the sunset. We were joined by Joel, we chatted and enjoyed a nice sunset. Before it got dark we made our way into the town where George and I grabbed a famous Pushkar falafel from lafa falafel, the spot in Pushkar where 3 falafel stores sit adjacent to one another and customers enjoy their food on-street-seating. It was pretty good, nothing on the ones we had in the Philippines though! We thought we’d make our way back to the hostel for a chilled night.....

    Upon arriving back at the hostel the guy behind the check-in desk said to Joel he had good and bad news. The bad news was that his washing wasn’t going to be done in time for his checkout because the man who does the laundry is getting married today. However the good news was that by means of an apology he was invited to his wedding. Seems like a pretty good apology to us! He proceeded to say the three of us were invited and even showed us the very official invitation card he had received. Tom was 100% up for it as he’s always wanted to attend an Indian wedding and even more so here in India. It took some convincing for me to be up for it with my current stomach situation but eventually I agreed to join.

    We changed into some jeans, still with my scruffy jumper on and got into the party TukTuk that was waiting for us outside the hostel. The wedding was in Ajmer, the town that we arrived into on the train and the “15 minute drive” turned into a 45 minute drive, hanging onto the back of the TukTuk as the driver (who was high) drove far too quickly, meandering through traffic and not slowing down for speed bumps. However, we got to talk to the guys who were working at the hostel, Amit and Micky and they were both really nice guys! Eventually we arrived at the venue, after checking it was the right wedding as so many weddings were taking place today. The entrance was very grand and I could feel 1,000 eyes looking at us as we entered the venue. However, everyone was warm and welcoming to us. Handshake and handshake and selfie after selfie we made our way round the wedding, enjoying the fantastic food that was on offer. I had a paneer curry, vegetable kofta curry, biriyani with freshly made chipatis and naan breads. As I was eating the delicious food, taking in my surroundings it hit me that it was a much more sophisticated than I was expecting. People were stood around chatting and enjoying their food, it felt more like a get together, not a wedding. After finishing the food I dumped my plate into one of the many huge buckets that had been put out to collect cutlery and we made our way over to meet the bride and the groom. I had spoken to Micky on the way and he told me that this was an arranged marriage by their parents, who also paid for this occasion...on average about 1 million Indian rupees, or £10,000 for a wedding of this scale. We waited in a queue to meet the bride and groom, got a picture with them, said our congratulations, got a sweet as hell coffee (Tom got 3 for him and had mine too!) and were back in the TukTuk on our way back to the hostel. The journey back was equally rough but we got back at around 11:30, where we made my way straight to bed having ticked off one more thing from the bucket list.
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    Sally-Anne Marsland

    Yum -reeee hydrate xx

    3/11/20Reply
    Sally-Anne Marsland

    So stunning -so Indiaxx

    3/11/20Reply
    Sally-Anne Marsland

    Hello George! Xxx⭐️😘

    3/11/20Reply
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  • Day50

    Pushkar and the infamous Delhi Belly

    February 24, 2020 in India ⋅ ☀️ 24 °C

    I didn’t get much sleep last night, it was very cold and I was unprepared for that and the India guys who had the beds around us were (of course) loud and obnoxious throughout the night. However, the train got to Ajmer 35 minutes early (without any notification). It was the classic case of get off then figure it out. We’d heard about a bus to Pushkar but had no idea where it went from. With various Tuktuk drivers offering us lifts costing the equivalent of two nights’ accommodation, we decided to walk the 2km to the bus station - quite nice after being cooped up on the train for 6 hours. We got to the bus station and asked where the bus to Pushkar was, one person told us it was the one leaving right now but we didn’t trust it so I went to the station master and asked...bus 22 it was then. We got on and waited for a driver to turn up. Meanwhile we tried to listen in on conversations to confirm of this was to Pushkar. After I demolished half my Oreos which I hadn’t eaten as I felt awful the previous night, we were on our way.

    The bus journey was only 14km and only cost us the equivalent of 16pence each and it seemed to stop for people wherever they wanted which was perfect as our hostel was a little walk from the Pushkar bus station. I got up and motioned to the conductor that we wanted to get off, after a while she blew her whistle and we were dropped just 500m from the hostel...result! We got there, groggy and in desperate need of sleep and as it was only 07:30 and check in was at 13:00 we headed to the rooftop in search of a makeshift bed for a few hours. In truth, we both slept until midday and we only woke because the sun started to bear down on us! We got up, checked in and then set out to have a look at Pushkar. I was still feeling pretty terrible with very frequent trips to the toilet, so we packed the loo roll just in case - the joys of India. On the way to town was a thali place we’d been recommended, only 50 rupees. Tom grabbed one and I just had our bottle of water. It was a massive thali, and obviously amazing value. I grabbed some bananas for the walk round town and we made our way to Pushkar Lake, or the holy lake.

    Pushkar is a prominent pilgrimage town where devout Hindus should visit at least once in their lifetime. We were both pleasantly surprised by this place, with a population of only 21,000 it was by far the smallest place we’d been in India, and it was refreshingly quiet and lacked the constant hassling we got in Mumbai and Udaipur. We chilled round the lake, which is a strict no shoes or socks zone - although cows can walk around all day and shit where they like. The town of Pushkar curls around the holy lake, which was said to have appeared when Brahma dropped a lotus flower...not sure if we believed that but it was pretty nonetheless. We found a shaded spot where there were a few pool with kids playing and the locals having their daily rituals. We had a few people come up to us and try some sort of scam where they give you a petal and then ask for money, and we also had a guy who started saying over and over “I am Indian” and then he stood right in front of me and blocked my view. Even though the town was clean for India, we still watched in awe as people came down to the lake, had a bath and then filled up their water bottles for later. From where we were sat we could see that the water wasn’t clear...these guys must have stomachs of steel!! After a while we went for a little walk and checked out some of the market street and a few other places we’d been recommended including a pizzeria and a falafel place. After seeing the pizza place, we’d decided there and then that we’d treat ourselves tonight and go for it! As we were both up for taking it easy, we headed back to the hostel as we knew they had hot water showers - a rarity in all of India it seems.

    On the way back the sudden urge to go to the toilet hit me in the worst way...I took a gamble on a fart and realised I needed to get to a western toilet in the next two minutes or I’d have to resort to the street! I grabbed the bag off Tom, which had to loo roll in, and ran back to the hostel and made it just in time. We showered and watched the sunset from our roof terrace and then headed back into town for our first western meal since leaving home. The pizza place was a little haven from the craziness of India...no roadside eating tonight, it was a beautiful courtyard with mellow music and a cool buzz about it. We ordered a good old margarita and a pepper onion pizza. We were even more excited when the table next to us had a pizza arrive...it looked bloody good. Ours arrived and we halved both to make two 50:50 pizzas and we savoured every mouthful...not much more can be said about this except that we splashed out and it only cost £3 each! Being very satisfied, we ambled back to the hostel, me stepping in a huge cow poo on the way back, chilled on the rooftop listening to music and writing the blog before hitting the extremely comfy beds for a well deserved rest, provided the Indian wedding happening nearby didn’t keep us up.
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    Sally-Anne Marsland

    So care free lovely -x

    3/11/20Reply
    Sally-Anne Marsland

    Beautiful xx

    3/11/20Reply
    Sally-Anne Marsland

    Stunning bath!!

    3/11/20Reply
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  • Day48

    Exlploring Udaipur on foot

    February 22, 2020 in India ⋅ ☀️ 25 °C

    We woke up at 8am, with the Indians in our room having a conversation at volume 100%, because they can’t do anything quietly. Up on the rooftop for 8:15 to wait for our free hostel breakfast. However, unlike yesterday we were not the only ones on the rooftop today so had to eat a normal amount today. We went for a walk to find some mopeds to rent today, however, we were unsuccessful and apparently all the mopeds were rented today...we tried our hostel and they said the same thing. We quickly moved around our plans for today, booked a moped for tomorrow through the hostel and then set off for Lake Sagar, about 2km away. After walking for about 2 minutes, Tom had placed his foot foot into the largest and wettest cow poo ever... today wasn’t going our way. After a little while we got to the lake, it was nice and much more local than Lake Pichola. We chilled out at a park near the water for a little while and then decided to walk a bit further to a nicer park. On the way we saw a Kayak competition taking place so we sat and cheered for a random team and then continued.

    We arrived at Saheliyon-Ki-Bari and when we realised you had to pay in we walked to a nearby park built onto a roundabout. There was a nice pond in the middle where you could rent out pedalos. We chilled here for a little while looking into Nepal, and whether we would need to get additional insurance or not...it was looking like it could cost us up to £600 each to get insured!! After an hour or two chilling on the grass we made our way back to Udaipur City Palace to check out the outside areas surrounding the place that you had to buy a separate ticket for. We chilled out here on the grass where we eventually got an answer about our travel insurance after talking directly with our insurance company, we didn’t need additional insurance to trek around Nepal!! This actually made us very happy and made me feel like we’d saved so much money! With a spring in our step we made our way back to the hostel rooftop where we watched sunset and then went for a dinner Thali with the Germans that we had met. The food was great again! Back to hostel, chilled out some more and then went to bed.
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    Sally-Anne Marsland

    I spy a Nelly heiffferrrt lump!!

    3/10/20Reply
    Sally-Anne Marsland

    Like your table!!!

    3/10/20Reply
    Sally-Anne Marsland

    Oh Tiger Tom!!

    3/10/20Reply
    Sally-Anne Marsland

    Beautiful xx

    3/10/20Reply
     
  • Day47

    Udaipur Shiva Festival

    February 21, 2020 in India ⋅ ☀️ 27 °C

    We were both awake by 8am and made our way up to the roof terrace to wait for our free breakfast. We were a little early but didn’t mind as we both really liked the view from the terrace. When breakfast came we kept eating more and more, the poor guy who worked at the hostel had to keep bringing more...we had 2 boiled eggs, 4 curry toasties and about half a loaf of bread worth of jam on toast (Jammie dodger jam). Very satisfied and now fuelled for the day we left our hostel and made our way across the bridge, it was a gorgeous day, clear blue skies and a nice warm temperature.

    Today was the Hindu festival of Shivaratri, a festival dedicated to the worship of Lord Shiva. We walked through the colourful streets and our first stop of the day was Jagdish temple, a large Hindu temple raised on a tall terrace that you had to climb up to via very steep stairs, plastered with beggars and people trying to sell us tat. Upon entering the temple there was a nice atmosphere, obviously fuelled by today’s festivities. There were people sat around a shrine in the centre of the temple singing and playing instruments, which we watched for a little while before walking round the rest of the old temple. Back onto the streets we then made our way over to the City Palace, however before we got there we were blocked by a large group of Hindu people dancing and singing in the street to incredibly loud music. We watched as they had their party and then went to look at getting tickets for the city palace. It was 300 rupees which we thought was quite a lot, but it was one of the main things to do here so we went for it. Inside the palace was quite busy, with it being the festival today. There were loads of Indians, so we sat and let the majority of them feed through before we started our walk round. The palace was really well kept, and pretty interesting as each reigning Maharaja had added bits onto it over a period of 400 years so each bit was different. We were enjoying it as the palace was nice and cool with amazing views out over Pichola Lake and the rest of Udaipur. However, we quickly became annoyed at pretty much everyone else in the palace as all they seemed to want was a picture of themselves in front of some artefact, without even looking at it or taking it in. We were ushered out the way numerous times for one of these photo shoots which we felt was a bit silly...but Indians love a picture of themselves.

    We spend a good three or four hours at the palace before we left to check out a viewpoint we’d seen on maps.me. It was a pretty easy walk to the bottom of it and not too hot, so we started to climb. There was a cable car you could take up, but you couldn’t get to this viewpoint. On the way up we saw a. Abandoned pink tower which had a little rooftop, so we went off the path and clambered up the hillside to get to it. Up three flights of stairs and to the roof and we were treated to an amazing view of the lakes, palace, and temples of Udaipur. After a bit, we climbed even higher up try hill to get the sunset view.m and found these two pagoda things which seemed to have the best view of the city. We were up here quite early for the sunset, but we got some really nice pictures and just watched the scenery change as the sun went down. It was absolutely gorgeous, and as it got darker the city palace and other buildings started to get lit up.

    After soaking it all up, we made our way down (via the top of the pink tower again) and then began the walk back to the hostel. On the way back, this man on a bike pulled up and showed us a WhatsApp text, it had words like ‘bull’ and ‘guys’ and ‘massage’ in it at a quick glance. We walked on, but I turned to Tom and insisted that was some sort of sexual offering. He wasn’t so sure, but I was certain. Out of curiosity, we slowed down a bit and sure enough the man stopped next to us again. We asked him what he wanted and he plainly responded saying “I want sex, you have sex with my wife”. We were speechless and couldn’t actually believe what he said. He then clarified and said that he and his wife were swingers...we had to politely decline his offer but wished him luck. After this, we were really keen for food, so stopped at a place which looked busy, always a good sign, and we decided we’d get a mixture of dishes after we’d had thali for what felt like weeks. We got vegetable pakora, this guys own veg biriyani and a peanut masala, the latter of which arrived with a flame coming out of it! All the food was amazing and safe to say we gobbled it all up.

    As it was the Shiva Festival today in Udaipur there was a load of people now out on the streets and we got offered this creamy/green drink. This western guy said to me that it wasn’t strong, so we both took a cup. When we drank it we couldn’t even taste any alcohol, so it must have been really weak. It wasn’t the nicest of drinks, so Tom only had a little bit, whilst I had the whole thing as we were in front of the guys who gave it to us and I didn’t want to seem rude. We walked up the street so Tom could dump his in the bin, as two kids followed us desperate for the drink but Tom refused to give it to them. We made it back to the hostel finally and went to the rooftop to chill out for a bit. Up there we met an English girl and a Finnish guy and we were all just chatting about generic travel stuff. It was at this point I started to feel a bit weird in my stomach and I immediately thought the drink had poisoned me. However, I then overheard the Finnish guy say that the drink the locals give out on the street is a ‘special lassi’. In other words it’s a drink laced with marijuana. I hadn’t been poisoned, I’d got accidentally high. Tom has looked over to me and I was in fits of giggles at absolutely nothing at all...at least I was happy high and not depressed. Everything made me laugh, even the name of the state we were in ‘Rajasthan’ and even more so the people called ‘Rajasthani’s’ nearly had me on the floor. This went on for a while, and even Tom started to just laugh, more so at the state I was in. We went downstairs as I had some chocolate biscuits, so we demolished them and then decided we’d go on a midnight hunt for Oreos. We went down to the main door, and it was shut, but couldn’t be locked as you can’t lock people in or out of a hostel. We spent about 5 minutes pushing and pulling, looking for a lever, trying to twist bolts and pulling chains that were on this door but for the life of us we couldn’t figure it out! We had to find and ask the hostel manager how you open the door and he just said ‘slide them’...actually so simple. We got our Oreos smashed them and then duly went to bed. It had been a long and eventful day, but a fun evening.
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    Sally-Anne Marsland

    Love this xxx

    3/10/20Reply
    Sally-Anne Marsland

    Oh George -our favourite person xx

    3/10/20Reply
    Sally-Anne Marsland

    Wow what a view and what a George xx India is stunning x

    3/10/20Reply
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  • Day46

    Exploring Udaipur City

    February 20, 2020 in India ⋅ ☀️ 29 °C

    I woke up at around 8am with 40km still to go until Udaipur. I had a really good nights sleep! I opened the curtain watching the world go by and then put a film on until the bus conductor loudly started screaming “Udaipur, Udaipur” with a lot of other incomprehensible words. We got off the bus where we got an Ola to take us to our hostel for only 27 rupees thanks to my online discount. The hostel was right in the middle of Udaipur, on the island connected by bridges on Pichola lake.

    We found our hostel, Whereabout Hostel, checked in and then chilled out on their roof terrace which had an awesome view of Pichola lake. We read through some of the Lonely Planet books which were there to get a better sense of what what here in Udaipur as we hadn’t done much research about here. After a little while our room was ready for us to check in, so we dumped our bags and then went to grab some lunch at a place called “Queen Cafe” that we had read about in Lonely Planet book. This place was tiny, and run by these two old people and their daughter Meera who also did a cooking school. As it turned out, Meera also did the cooking for the cafe and soon after ordering she brought us two biriyani. It was a bit odd as she just sat there and watched us eat the food, clearly doing the hard sell on her cooking school. After the food, she even insisted on taking us to her kitchen to show us where we’d cook. We were up for the idea, but it was so expensive so we would consider it long and hard.

    We walked around the old part of the town over the little bridges which connected little islands and lakes and we were quite surprised at how pretty it was here after coming from Mumbai. Even though we’d had some good sleep on the bus, we were still quite tired, so we went to the hostel rooftop and had a little planning session for Udaipur and the next few places we were going. We knew of this view point which overlooked the Palace Island Hotel to watch the sun go down. This was a place which had been a main filming point in James Bond Octopussy and it was really nice and quite grand.

    By this point we were quite hungry, and looked around a few different parts of town but they were all quite expensive. So we went back to near our hostel and got a Thali for 120 rupees. We were sold, and it was all fresh too, so we sat down and almost immediately there was a power-cut. Luckily the guy doing our cooking was creating enough light with the occasion flame up of his pan, so it didn’t delay our food. The power came back on and we were served an enormous thali which was delicious. We went back to the rooftop and tried to watch Slumdog Millionaire on the iPad, but there was no subtitles and half of it was in Hindi...oh well, so we just headed to bed for a good sleep.
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    Robert Marsland

    Stunning!

    2/29/20Reply
    Robert Marsland

    What a view x

    2/29/20Reply
    Robert Marsland

    Udaipur was one of TT’s and Paw Paw’s favourite places ! Xx

    2/29/20Reply
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  • Day2

    First Impressions

    February 24, 2020 in India ⋅ 🌙 16 °C

    I have long held the ambition to visit India and in particular Rajasthan and have to keep pinching myself to believe that Lesley and I are actually here. It’s quite difficult to know where to begin after our first day, so I guess the beginning is the place to start! We arrived here in Jaipur late last night after a long and tiring journey. Our hotel, Alsisar Haveli, is a converted Maharaja’s palace and as exotic and ornate as you might imagine. There are some 35 such establishments in Jaipur as the old ruling families find ways to diversify and keep their ancestral homes alive.
    Despite only a few hours sleep, we were up and out by 7.30 am to catch the flower market at its peak. On the way, we stopped to view the Palace of the Winds, a world famous pink sandstone edifice, which to my surprise is beside a busy road. Sadly, it is only a facade for a more mundane building and has some 350 screened windows, for the ladies of the family to look out on the the scene below in privacy! The flower market is held within the walls of the old city and we entered through one of the main gates, the East or Sun Gate. There is a west gate known as the Moon gate and many other smaller entrances beside. The flower market was a complete assault on the senses; perfume, colour, people, monkeys, noise and surrounding ramshackle buildings, all in one glorious kaleidoscope. The flowers are mainly in head form, for making into garlands as offerings at the many temples. We watched both ladies and men making them up deftly and with a great eye for colour. It was almost more than our tired brains could assimilate, but what a beginning.
    We wandered on to the fruit and vegetable market, which was equally fantastic. The produce, both fruit, vegetables and flowers are gathered in the early hours of the morning 365 days a year and brought in daily for the public to buy. The selection and quality is astonishing. Ladies wander by with enormous bundles balanced on their heads (great posture), men are chattering incessantly (well they would), handcarts full of wares push past and a barber is wet shaving a client on the side of the path and so it goes on. Everything you could imagine and more.
    From there we walked the streets to meet our coach. You are accosted by a jumble of smart buildings, temples, telephone wires, ruins, sacred cows and the odd pig. Scooters whip past you with whole families piled on top. Chaotic would not be too extreme, but it is also lively, friendly and not at all intimidating.
    Our next stop was the Citi Palace, home of the last ruling Maharaja of Jaipur. The first Maharajah built the old city as his new capital between 1727-48. The family still live in the adjoining Moon Palace, but the head of the family can no longer call himself Maharaja according to modern Indian law. The palace is out of this world architecturally and decoratively. Like all of the old city it is painted saffron pink, hence the moniker ‘Pink City’. This came about due to the visit in 1867 of the then Prince of Wales, the future Edward V11. A ‘Durbar’ (Council meeting) was held to decide how best to welcome the Prince with suitable aplomb and the decision taken to paint the whole of the city pink. It certainly created the desired impression and it has been this way ever since. When Edward ascended to the throne, the Maharaja was invited to the coronation and set off to attend with his large retinue and two huge silver flagons of Ganges water. These were specially transported, for the Maharaja’s drinking water as he flatly refused to contemplate drinking ‘Thames water’! These are the largest silver vessels in the world made from one single sheet of metal, with no joins. They are on display in glass cases and the thought of moving them anywhere is quite mindboggling.
    We wandered around this huge exalted complex and found ourselves in the Peacock courtyard.
    It is very beautiful and has four superb peacock doorways to depict the four seasons and has to be seen to be believed. Having admired the textile museum, which was crammed full of glorious costumes and locally made fabric, we went to met our coach and were driven through teeming ever narrower streets until arriving quite unexpectedly at Samode Haveli for lunch. This is an oasis of calm and tranquility hidden, in plain sight, in the middle of the hustle and bustle of the old city. Here are beautiful gardens full of flowers and plants. There is a luxurious swimming pool and outdoor lounging courtyards full of running water, fountains and greenery. This is another Maharajas palace full of heavily decorated rooms and now operating as a hotel.
    Lunch was really good and my preconceived notions of Indian cuisine are changing rapidly!
    After lunch we were taken by tuk tuk across town to the site of the filming of the Exotic Marigold Hotel Series. We careered down backstreets with all of life being lived out in the street. It was a barmy, white knuckle, but exhilarating ride. The traffic is utterly mad. They come from all directions, weaving in and out like lunatics, horns blaring and how there are not constant collisions I’ll never know. I suspect viewed from above it would like a intricately choreographed group dance! As a driver you certainly need incredible reflexes. The owner of the Haveli used in the filming is a very tall, retired, distinguished Indian Army Brigadier. He and his wife were charming and very hospitable, conversing all the time in perfect English with little accent and it brought our first day in India to a lively and modern close. A slice of India both ancient and modern has been offered up and absorbed with fascination. We headed back to the tuk tuks to retrace ours steps back to the coach and ultimately our hotel. It has been a mind blowing day and my mind is reeling, but in a thoroughly good way. Roll on tomorrow!
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    Alyson Wise

    Well Dulcie , your first day seems jam packed ! Roll on a good nights sleep 💤......... Aly X

    2/26/20Reply
    Margaret Thursfield

    Good to read about first days too, sounds an amazing trip & continue to enjoy! Love M x

    2/26/20Reply
    Cheryl Daubney

    Sounds wonderful. Wish I was there!

    2/26/20Reply
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  • Day49

    Indien Tag 22

    February 18, 2020 in India ⋅ ☀️ 27 °C

    Start in den Tag:
    7️⃣:0️⃣0️⃣

    Tag in 6 Worten:
    ▪️Morgenyoga
    ▪️Nepaltrekkingplantag
    ▪️Instagramchellange
    ▪️Healthy food day *hust*
    ▪️Hostel nur für 1h verlassen (Schnutcrémeshopping&food)
    ▪️Wir können schon die Hälfte des Tee Bedarfs eines Inders trinken🤗☕ + Nachtisch

    Was hat uns heute ein Lächeln auf die Lippen gezaubert:
    Ich durfte Dart gegen die Einheimischen spielen.. Hab nur einmal in die Wand geworfen 😁
    Und.. Heute war ein lustiger Tag..

    Es gab Pink sauce noodles zum Abendessen. 🍝 Die Sauce war orange.. Wie die pink city.. Die haben einen sehr guten Humor hier. 😂🤣

    Mealplan:
    🕗 Veg Omelette
    🕗 Pancakes with honey
    🕐 Veg Fried Rice (very spicy)
    🕐 Masala Dosa
    🕕 Pizza Margarita
    🕧 Pink sauce noodles

    Besondere Begegnungen:
    Mal wieder unser Zimmer Genosse.. Er hat uns auf einen Tee eingeladen (den gratis Tee, den es jeden Tag von 18-19 Uhr gibt).

    Informatives:
    Wenn einem nicht die Lippen beim Essen abbrennen sollen, nicht vergessen spicy abzubestellen. 😁 Ist immer noch spicy genug.🌶️

    Video 2:
    Mukhwas ist eine bunte indische bzw. pakistanische Süßigkeit und Verdauungshilfe. Durch seine Zutaten gibt es vor allem einen frischen Atem. Es gibt verschiedenste Mischungen, einige bestehen aus Kräutern, Samen und Körnern wie Fenchel, Anis oder Sesam andere beinhalten auch Nüsse (z. B. Stücke von Kokosnuss oder Betelnuss). Diese Zutaten werden entweder direkt so angeboten oder aber mit einer Hülle aus Zucker überzogen. Zusätzlich kommen dabei Farben und Aromen / ätherische Öle Pfefferminz, Eukalyptus oder Rosenöl zum Einsatz. Nach dem gründlichen Kauen von Mukhwas wird empfohlen Wasser zu trinken, um den Geschmack zu intensivieren und den Mund von den Spänen der Kräuter/Körner zu befreien.
    Quelle: Wikipedia 😁 (PS. Ja ich weiß Wikipedia ist keine Quelle 🙈😁)
    Read more

    Annette Mayer-Schmitt

    Habt ihr warme Kleidung?

    2/18/20Reply
    B Thart

    Was ist das? Kräuter, Salz, Chemikalien..... ??

    2/18/20Reply
    Jana.alive

    Gute Frage 🤗 siehe aktualisierte Informationen 😁

    2/18/20Reply
    2 more comments
     
  • Day48

    Indien Tag 21

    February 17, 2020 in India ⋅ ☀️ 27 °C

    Start in den Tag:
    7️⃣:0️⃣0️⃣

    Tag in 6 Worten:
    ▪️Sightseeing with Gani
    ▪️Poor Elephants ☹️🐘 & Behind the Bollywood Movie Scenes
    ▪️Heritage Village Textile (in Handarbeit gefertigte Stoffe 😍) ➡️ erneuter Besuch notwendig sobald das Themenzimmer unseres B&B's gestaltet werden kann
    ▪️Büroarbeit
    ▪️Tuk Tuk Fahrt durchs "Kriesengebiet" 😁
    ▪️Tote Hosen gehört 😍

    Was hat uns heute ein Lächeln auf die Lippen gezaubert:
    Herzlicher Tuk Tuk Fahrer.

    Mealplan:
    🕗 Cheese Omelette with coffee
    🕗 Cheese Sandwich with coffee
    🕐 Veg Fried Rice with dal, lemon soda
    🕐 Uttapam, lemon soda
    🕕 Grilled Veg. Sandwich
    🕧 Chicken Club Sandwich

    Besondere Begegnungen:
    Ein Inder der jetzt unter mir schläft hat uns bestimmt 2 Stunden lang über den Bildungs- und Anstellungsstatus seiner Familie aufgeklärt. 😁 Zum Glück hat er ein ganz schlechtes Englisch gesprochen, was die Sache gezogen hat wie Kaugummi.

    Informatives:
    Fortbesuche lohnen sich nicht! Viel zu teuer und überfüllt.
    Read more

    Annette Mayer-Schmitt

    Sieht doch cool aus im Fort

    2/17/20Reply
    Jana.alive

    Den Raum hat auch niemand gefunden 😁

    2/17/20Reply
    B Thart

    So ein schönes Foto! 😊

    2/17/20Reply
    Jana.alive

    Dankeschöön 🤩🤗

    2/18/20Reply
     
  • Day47

    Indien Tag 20

    February 16, 2020 in India ⋅ ☀️ 27 °C

    Start in den Tag:
    4️⃣:4️⃣0️⃣

    Tag in 6 Worten:
    ▪️Sleepertrain to Jaipur
    ▪️Hawa Mahal von gegenüber betrachtet
    ▪️Schickes Hostel😍 (Moustache)
    ▪️Pink city eher light orange city
    ▪️Mittagessen mit nem Pärchen dem wir begegnet sind, die auf der Suche nach dem selben Restaurant waren.
    ▪️Sonnenuntergang mit Soshanna und Miles am Nahagarah Fort geschaut (200 Eintritt pp fürs Restaurant - > was totally worth it!!)

    Was hat uns heute ein Lächeln auf die Lippen gezaubert:
    Ramondischer Sonnenuntergang auf mystischer Anhöhe. 😁

    Mealplan:
    🕗 Cornflakes whit milk, chocolate Muffin, Lemon iced tee
    🕗 Vegetable Omlette with buttertoast, Lemon iced tee
    🕐 Masala Dosa, Lemonsoda
    🕐 Thali, Lemonsoda
    🕕 Club Veg Sandwitch with french fries, Ginger, honey tee, Lemon iced Tee

    Besondere Begegnungen:
    Ein ca. 16 Jahre altes Mädchen (mit ihrer Mum), das am Bahnhof mit mir reden wollte, da es noch nie mit einer Ausländerin gesprochen hatte.. Total beeindruckend, da sie ein Weltklasse Englisch spricht, das sie sich selbst nur über Filme usw. beibringt.

    Informatives:
    Im sleeper train (AC.. Upps. 🙈) sollte sich auf jeden Fall warm angezogen werden! 🥶
    Read more

    Susanne Krebs

    Wow!👍😍

    2/17/20Reply
     

You might also know this place by the following names:

State of Rājasthān, State of Rajasthan, Rajasthan, راجستان, ৰাজস্থান, Раджастхан, Раджастан, राजस्थान, রাজস্থান, Rádžasthán, Racastan, ރާޖަސްތާން, Ρατζαστάν, Raĝastano, Rajastán, Rajastan, રાજસ્થાન, ראגסטאן, Radźastan, Rádzsasztán, ラージャスターン州, რაჯასტანი, ರಾಜಸ್ಥಾನ, 라자스탄 주, Rajasthana, Radžasthanas, Rādžastāna, Раџастан, രാജസ്ഥാൻ, ରାଜସ୍ଥାନ, ਰਾਜਸਥਾਨ, Radżastan, راجستھان, Rajastão, राजस्थानराज्यम्, Radžastan, இராசத்தான், రాజస్థాన్, Роҷистон, รัฐราชสถาน, Rojasthon, ראדזשאסטהאן, 拉贾斯坦邦

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