France
Corsica

Here you’ll find travel reports about Corsica. Discover travel destinations in France of travelers writing a travel blog on FindPenguins.

121 travelers at this place:

  • Day16

    Bastia/Korsika

    October 14 in France

    Ein typischer Sonntag wie in Deutschland. Nur ist es schön warm und so viele Leute sind draußen, auf dem Markt, flohmarkt und in all den Cafés an den Straßen. Total idyllisch und lokal 😊

    Hab auf dem Markt ein leckeres Baguette und einen Aufstrich gekauft sowie ein typisches fromagge gegessen. Mjami 😃 wirklich ein schöner Ort.Read more

  • Day10

    Corsica, France

    June 16, 2017 in France

    Corsica, less than an hour's ferry ride, and you get to speak a little French, or at least attempt to. The port of Bonifacio is where we entered Corsica....and what an entrance! The fortress walls dominated the view. We took the little tourist train up to the top of the fortress and old town . Great views from here. Perfect day for Alan's birthday!Read more

  • Day15

    Today, we left Bavella to make our way to the coast for a small crag right by the ocean. Mareike had seen it in our climbing guidebook and immediately loved the look of the climbs as well as the setting. Since there are just a few climbs and only two of them within our skill level, it was going to be an easy day with plenty of time to rest and enjoy the scenery. So far the theory :)

    We got there mid-day and immediately loved it. The climbing was mostly crack climbing. It looked super fun and hard at the same time, so we decided to set up a toprope (Leo was able to hike from the other side of the climb). Since the falls in toprope are so much shorter than on a lead climb, it is a lot less scary to do hard moves and makes climbing a lot easier mentally.

    Yet, this kind of climbing was totally new to Mareike - a lot of jamming your feet and hands in the crack and moving up one move at a time. She (and Leo from below) really had to push herself to trust those moves and keep climbing. So much fun to figure it out! She ended up climbing the harder climb three times and got more "graceful" each time :)

    Feeling great and well protected, we decided to venture out of our climbing comfort zone and try a 6a+ route, two levels above our hardest climb so far. It was a super challenging start but once Leo figured it out, he sent the route! Trying all sorts of moves for this hard route, we had totally lost track of time and realized the sun was setting already - what a full day of climbing fun! And we realized that we also finally learned what it means to run out of skin on our fingers ;)

    Since it was so late and we were tired, we decided to stay in a Bed and Breakfast. Such a good decision! It was an apatment attached to a lovely house up in the countryside. The owners Claude and Marie-France were the best, most friendly hosts and we had a few nice conversations in Mareike's broken French :)
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  • Day10

    Clanca Murata - T6 route

    May 27 in France

    After being forced into a seaside resort for the night due to a big rally car race around the Northern peninsula of Corsica, we spent the day in Bastia trying to figure out the most economical way to Bavella for climbing.

    Since buses don't make there way there until July and camping is a 10 minute drive away, we rented a car for 14€ a day. And yes, the car runs.

    In Bavella we took to the hills and spent a couple hours route finding our way up Clanca Murata. With no large packs today we were able to do some more intensive scramble climbing to the top.

    It was another great experience in route finding. There weren't any markers this time but we came across some old climbing bolts so we felt like we did a great job reading the rock.
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  • Day14

    Leo's pretend project

    May 31 in France

    We like to talk about having a project climb. Basically a climb that's one level above what you think you can climb and will take numerous attempts to complete. When we arrived in Bavella to climb we were 5b climbers (according to the French system). 5b is one of many climbing grades given to each route so you know whether you have a fighting chance to climb a route.

    While flipping through the guidebook in camp Leo saw a picture of a beautiful looking 5c route. "This should be our project". Mareike agreed that the route looked amazing and it was set, we had a project. This meant we would spend some time attempting the route, trying to reach the top figuring out the moves.

    The climb was a beautiful dihedral that had a couple slices running up the gut creating flakes to use as hands or foot jams. When we looked at the bottom of the climb the start was a great bouldery start (gymnastic type moves to get up). From there it was up a face and then you gain the final crack.

    As far as a project goes, well we both completed the climb first try. The start was a blast to figure out and took a series of about 5 moves to gain maybe a meter. Then after the first face, there was a large block to climb around/on top of using some holds underneath the block. At the top of the final crack we both agreed that after the last piece of protection you had to commit and make the final moves to the anchor.

    We've never felt so excited to finish a climb before. Both of us let out yells of excitement upon reaching the top. It might not have been a project, but we both agreed it was the funnest climb of the trip yet.
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  • Day2

    Ready and excited :)

    May 19 in France

    After the longest trip for Leo to get to Corsica (cancelled flights + sleeping in 3 airports + bad rerouting), we're finally together and all prepared for our hike!

    We ran some last errands yesterday and are now ready for our bus to take us south for the trailhead of our 2 week journey across Corsica.

    Off we go!
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  • Day16

    An actual rest day

    June 2 in France

    Today, we had a real rest day! We hiked up a stream to a 50m tall, narrow canyon with cascades running through. We set up our hammock by a little waterfall, slept in the sun, read our books, swam in the freeeeezing water, planned our next climbs, and enjoyed Corse pastries and fruits. Our bodies say thanks!Read more

  • Day5

    The rain just won't stop

    May 22 in France

    Sunshine! We feel it on the tent in the morning and get to work quickly to dry our stuff in the sun :) As we start the day, we talk to our fellow hikers - all the groups are unsure what to do. Everyone got soaked to the bones, a few hikers much more than us. We decide to give our stuff a good dry and then do a half day, as others start heading out. BUT we still play by nature's rules and so our half day for drying is cut awefully short by the next rain clouds - so we run and pack everything as quickly as possible. Around 10am, we start with a steep uphill and then a nice easy downhill into the forest.

    For our half day camp spot, we had read about an old hikers hut in our guide books, an abandoned refugio in the middle of the forest. It lays a bit off route and we get to play the trail finding game again, but manage to find old trail markings one by one. I will admit, we are both a bit creeped out the deeper we go into the unknown forest. We get there about 20 minutes away from the GR20 and start to look around. It's an old vacation hut that's barely been used in the last few years but otherwise in good shape. There are pots above a stove in the kitchen, beds and a fireplace in the other room. It looks like the mice have taken over here and we decided to dry our stuff off the clothes lines but sleep outside in the tent.
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  • Day7

    Route finding a must

    May 24 in France

    Waking up with out the sound of rain on the tent gives us hope, and when we stick our heads out for a peak and see blue sky we look to each other and say "we're clear for our summit bid". We kick it into high gear to leave camp as quickly as possible, our goal for the day is another alpine variant over the top of the South's highest peak, Monte Renoso.

    As we walk out of camp Mareike mentions a trail that will save us an hour getting to our approach. We quickly agree this is the best option and vear from the GR20, climbing the forested hills from rock cairn to rock cairn in route to the i'Pozzi bivouac.

    From the base of the approach we keep a close eye on the skies around us, we both know that thunderstorms end our journey to the top. We use our ice axes and crampons to reach the first saddle and pull out the map and GPS to confirm and discuss our route. From here we find the trail to not be much more difficult than other parts of our journey. We are able to reach the summit with only a couple short climbing sections and celebrate the top of Monte Renoso with sugary dragon tongue candy.

    Mareike brings up another variation to our trail down that would save us a day on the trail and keep us out of the valley. It's a ridge trail that connects into another trail that is supposed to be fun for kids, in the end we both highly doubted people take their kids here.

    There's not enough space to tell the story of the next 6 hours of our journey. It's a story to share over a hot meal or a cold beer with friends and family. We became stronger yet as a team as we negotiated thick fog, trails that seemed to end in cliffs, trails that were nonexistent, looming rock towers and snowfields that would play hide and seek and numerous up and down climbs through the granite. In the end we felt like we had the best adventure yet and truly used all of our mountain knowledge along the way. We also couldn't have been happier to get off our feet and lie down after a 12 hour day.
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  • Day8

    Rest day turned last day

    May 25 in France

    Today's goal was mostly to investigate how to best continue our journey. We head on a short one hour hike to Vizzavona, where the southern part of the GR20 ends and the northern higher altitude part starts.

    Besides finding a big lunch at a local restaurant, we also find Emile, the local "wise old man" when it comes to mountaineering in this area. We go over maps of the upcoming hikes and he shows us all the potential hazards (=mostly snow on steep parts of the trail as well as snow slides due to all the late snow they got this year).

    The result: most of the days (including tomorrow's) are still covered in too much snow on dangerously steep slopes too continue. And we decide to come back for the North half of the trail another year, instead of going around all the fun and most scenic parts of this trail now. And the alternative isn't bad: 2 weeks of climbing the mountains we've already fallen in love with :)
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You might also know this place by the following names:

Corse, Korsika, Corsica, Còrsega, 코르시카

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