Japan
Iwakuni

Discover travel destinations of travelers writing a travel journal on FindPenguins.
Travelers at this place
    • Day 16

      Hiroshima 2. Teil

      April 29 in Japan ⋅ 🌧 19 °C

      Liebes Tagebuch, am Abend haben wir uns noch das Castle angesehen und tatsächlich kam noch der Spielmannszug Vahrenheide vorbei. RESPEKT.
      Am nächsten Tag waren wir im Museum.
      Anschließend ineinem wunderschönen Park mit absoluten Kaiser-Wetter.
      Dann auf ein Hochhaus, wo auf einer Riesenleinwand das Heimspiel von Hiroshima gratis gezeigt wurde. Auf meine Frage, ob hier auch die Roten gezeigt werden, wurde ich milde belächelt.
      Abends endlich mal wieder italienische Küche, die dann doch (Gott sei Dank) sehr japanisch daherkam.
      Dann Darts und anschließend in eine Bar, in der wir den Besitzer mit der Band Trio bekannt gemacht haben. Herrlich.
      Read more

    • Day 36

      Day 36

      April 5 in Japan ⋅ 🌙 10 °C

      Today we left Hiroshima and headed as far south as we are going on this trip which is Yamaguchi prefecture! This is the prefecture at the end of the the Honshu island of Japan. We’ve actually loved Hiroshima, it definitely has a lot of variety with its history, beautiful scenery, fun islands, fully blossomed cherry blossoms, and a bit more of a chilled city vibe it’s gone very quickly and I can’t quite believe we are already leaving!

      We travelled on the train to yamaguchi and dropped our bags off before taking a bus to go see Akiyoshido limestone Cave. After getting the bus and walking for about 20 minutes through a very sleepy town we came across the entrance. With a roaring river we entered the cave and it was absolutely HUGE. It’s over 11km long of which 1000m is open to the public and the ceilings were 80m high! It was an absolute sight to behold! The cave was actually once a coral reef - yes it was underwater but over millions of years it was pushed up onto land due to tectonic plate activity and the rainwater has eroded the land forming these HUGE floor to ceiling stalagmites and stalactites and of course the cave it was an incredible work of Mother Nature. I wasn’t sure what to expect but this was absolutely breathtaking! I think the highlight for me was the “100 plates” which were formed by limestone deposits and are also nicknamed “the rice fields” as they look like an Ariel view of rice fields it was just extraordinary we were absolutely fascinated!

      After wandering through for about an hour we then headed up to the observatory deck through a lift in the cave?? I couldn’t quite wrap my head around a lift being in the middle of this cave!! It takes you up 80m and then a 500m walk up to the top where we enjoyed the view of the limestone plateau and the grasslands of Akiyoshidai. Enjoying the Sun on our faces and the stunning views we sat and had an ice cream - what a treat!

      We then walked down and back to the bus stop to work our way back to our accommodation. Today was absolutely fascinating we both loved learning about the cave and formation of it!
      Read more

    • Day 7

      Roadtrip - Akiyoshido Cave 🤯

      May 13 in Japan ⋅ ☀️ 19 °C

      Næste stop var Akiyoshido Cave
      👁️👄👁️

      Et grottesystem, der går over 1 kilometer ind i et bjerg, fyldt med spektakulære drypstensformationer, der er blevet formet over 300 millioner år 🤯

      Gemt væk i en lille sidegade i en bitte by, træder vi gennem en tropisk skov 🎍🎋 ind i den forhistoriske hule 🪨🗿
      Read more

    • Day 261

      Crossing between Honshu and Kyushu

      November 26, 2019 in Japan ⋅ ☀️ 15 °C

      The following day I was a bit worried - how was I going to cross from one Japanese island to another? There seemed to be a huge bridge but I was unsure whether I could ride it. A blog informed me of the existence of an underwater tunnel, only for pedestrians and bicycles. Nice ! So I went across at night, among joggers and walkers who use this passage to do a bit of exercice. Inside the tunnel, no artistic lighting like in the tunnel of Croix rousse in Lyon, but some undersea life drawings, like in the Marne river tunnel (sorry for the 100% French references !).

      Since it was already dark and late when arriving on Kyushu, I found the closest park to camp. Not a great spot : not enough space and flat grass, too many fishermen and passerbys... And surprise, at 5:30 am, a loud group of retired people invaded the garden for their early morning gym. With them, a dog dressed in a "Christmas style flashing light garland coat" kept barking around my tent. A bit alarmed by all this noise, I packed everything and folded my tent very quickly. Aouch. Too early...
      Read more

    • Day 38

      Day 37-38

      April 7 in Japan ⋅ ☁️ 18 °C

      Day 37

      I can’t believe we are on day 37 already it’s honestly going by so quickly! Now spring has fully bloomed in Japan we decided to enjoy this to the fullest but going to the “rainbow tulip garden”. This sits right at the end of the honshu island so much so that it has a view of the MASSIVE bridge that connects Honshu and Kyushu. We aren’t venturing onto Kyushu but it was very cool to see the bridge that connects the two!

      The tulip garden was a train and a bus journey away and it’s absolutely stunning. It’s basically a smaller and quieter Amsterdam. Rows of tulips heading up the hill all colour arranged is just beautiful. Cherry blossoms dotted throughout the park provide nice places to sit and waste a few hours enjoying the view. As usual, we were the only foreign tourists there it all appeared to be domestic tourism visiting the garden and we got a few strange looks - I don’t think people are used to seeing foreigners here!

      Sitting under a cherry blossom tree and enjoying the Sun we had a few snacks and watched the world go by for a while.

      We discovered there was literally nothing else to do around the garden at all, it was frankly in the middle of nowhere apart from the bridge so we headed back. It was quite a long way to go just for the tulip garden but it was definitely worth it, it was so pretty!

      We finished the day with a teppanyaki, we’ve definitely got better at finding alternatives to noodles now!

      Day 38

      Today we decided to reattempt fishing so we travelled to a tiny little town by the sea and found a little rod rental shop. A very sweet old man rented us some rods and then gave us a massive bucket full of krill for bait which I was grateful for as I didn’t want it to be live worms! We went to the end of the pier and began fishing next to a few other Japanese families. There are definitely worse places to fish with a lovely view out of the bay and watching the fishing boats go in and out.

      After about an hour of not catching anything I was getting a little fidgety- those who know me well know I’m not the most patient person on earth! But I was saved by the very sweet old man. I feel a bit bad just calling him “old man” but i don’t know his name and even if I did I’m sure I wouldn’t be able to spell or pronounce it! He gestured for me to give him the rod so I did and he led me further down the pier and then showed me how he fishes. He definitely looked like he knew what he was doing more than us but I don’t think that’s very hard! After studying his techniques he passed me the rod back and about 5 minutes later I caught the first fish! I was absolutely chuffed with this. It was the smallest fish I’ve ever seen and I’m very glad that this wasn’t our plan for dinner as we definitely would have gone hungry! It didn’t matter to me though I was so excited until I then realised that I had to unhook it. Turning to Jacob he had the sudden realisation that I wasn’t going to unhook the fish and that it was now his job. You can call me girly and screamish if you wish and that’s probably fair but I really didn’t want to unhook the fish. In total I caught 3 fish and Jacob caught 1 but it’s not a competition and it’s not like I’m keeping track or anything ;).

      Handing back out rods we thanked our teacher and then went to catch the bus which didn’t arrive which was great. After an hour and a half we managed to catch a different bus to a train station and then catch the train back. Today was our last day in yamaguchi and we are headed to Osaka tomorrow with more fish activities on the agenda tomorrow- wish me luck!
      Read more

    • Day 260

      Morning tea with Spinoza (Yamaguchi)

      November 25, 2019 in Japan ⋅ ☁️ 18 °C

      One night I camp in a park next to a majestic five storeys pagoda. I feel blessed with this spot, all the more that the site stays open all night : I can watch the beautifully litten building and visit some temples while on my way to do the dishes. I even enjoy the luxury of choosing among three toilet blocks ! I elect my favorite : the one with large mirrors, clean sinks and... plugs ! Despite the relaxed atmosphere for camping in Japan, I set up my tent discreetly, between a zen garden and some bushes, so as not to disturb anyone.

      In the morning, in a bright mood after a good night of sleep, I have my breakfast comfortably seated in a wooden shelter. A couple arrives nearby and starts doing some harmonious (and sometimes odd) Tai Shi moves. An eye contact and a smile with the lady, and here she comes to start a chat with me. Her English is really good and she seems like a thoughtful and interesting person. Since we still have things to say to one another after a few minutes, she kindly invites me for a cup of tea. Here I am, pushing my bicycle through the narrow streets of Yamaguchi to reach their home, instead of getting started with my day. Why not? It is not as if I had an appointment anywhere...

      The lady, Keiko, is a self-taught potter. She shows me her workshop overlooking their garden. You can feel her inner joy and unboasting pride of creating beautiful objects. The man, Osamu, is a Spinoza scholar, probably one of the top-end specialists of Spinoza in Japan. Looking at his desk and at the bookshelves, I feel dumbstruck at my own ignorance. I would never have imagined that so many books had been written on Spinoza's philosophy and feel ashamed for not even being sure which country he was from and in which language he was writing... Shit, my philosophy classes seem like ages ago. Wikipedia reminds me of a few facts : Spinoza was neither Italian nor Swiss, as the name might suggest, but from Holland, originally from a Portuguese/Spanish jewish family, who had to flee the Spanish Inquisition. And he was writing in...Latin ! Like most intellectuals in 17th century Europe. But this was not an easy guess since this dear Baruch was fluent in "hebrew, aramean, spanish, portuguese, dutch and could also write in french, german, italian and ancient greek" (!). He almost became a rabbi but was soon expelled from his community at the age of 23 while he was starting developing his own philosophical stance, inspired by such major thinkers as Descartes, Hobbes, Leibniz.

      But anyway, during our tea I cannot even recall 1 or 2 titles of his works, so I carefully avoid the topic so as not to make a fool of myself. Instead, we gently talk about Japanese vs French culture (they lived in Paris for a while), travels, food... while tasting delicious red bean sweets. I leave them light-hearted in this wonderful sunny day. The flawless cycling lane along the river, edged by multicolor autumn leaves, creates a perfect setting for my ride. Today, everything seems smooth and effortless. I feel myself powerful and flexible, highly adaptable to what will come up next. Could this be the art of joy described by Spinoza ? 😊
      Read more

    • Day 63

      Yamaguchi Tagestrip

      August 20, 2023 in Japan ⋅ ⛅ 31 °C

      Letzten Sonntag haben wir uns zu 5. ein Auto gemietet und sind für einen Tagestrip in den Norden gefahren. Als Erstes waren wir in den Tropfsteinhöhlen im Akiyoshida Nationalpark. Anschließend sind wir weiter in den Norden, zunächst zu einem Schrein direkt am Meer. Als Letztes sind wir über die zweitlängste Brücke Japans zur Insel Tsunoshima gefahren. Insgesamt ein lustiger TripRead more

    • Day 11

      Kammon-Strasse

      March 9 in Japan ⋅ 🌙 5 °C

      In der Nacht durchfahren wir die Kammon-Straße. Sie gilt als die verkehrsreichste Wasserstraße der Welt, verläuft zwischen den beiden Hauptinseln Japans und verbindet das Japanische Meer mit dem Ostchinesischen Meer. An der schmalsten Stelle werden die beiden Inseln durch eine über 1.000 Meter lange Hängebrücke miteinander verbunden. Diese Brücke passieren wir etwa um 23.30 Uhr. Wir stehen trotz Kälte und viel Wind lange an Deck, um dieses Geschehen zu beobachten. Dafür müssen wir uns dringend mit Wiener Würstchen 🌭 in der Pazifik Lounge belohnen 😜.Read more

    • Day 43

      Iwakuni

      March 28, 2023 in Japan ⋅ ☀️ 18 °C

      Iwakuni ist wegen der Brücke bei Japanern sehr beliebt um sich die Kirschblüte anzusehen. Es ist wirklich hübsch da und wenn alle Bäume blühen sieht es so bezaubernd aus wie man sich die Kirschblüte eben vorstellt. Vielmehr gab's dort aber nicht zu machen, war ein entspannter Tag.Read more

    • Day 211

      Mioya shrine

      April 16 in Japan ⋅ ☀️ 19 °C

      I actually wanted to go somewhere else than this shrine, but it's to far.
      Kitakyushu is so small and cute. I got 6 porkbuns for 550¥, crazy.
      If you want something different than Osaka or Hiroshima come here.
      No tourists at all
      Read more

    You might also know this place by the following names:

    Iwakuni, إواكوني, ایواکونی، یاماگوچی, Ngàm-koet-sṳ, Ivakuni, איוואקוני, IWK, 岩国市, ივაკუნი, 이와쿠니 시, Iwakuni-chhī, Ивакуни, Івакуні, 岩國市

    Join us:

    FindPenguins for iOSFindPenguins for Android