Norway
Kautokeino

Here you’ll find travel reports about Kautokeino. Discover travel destinations in Norway of travelers writing a travel blog on FindPenguins.

10 travelers at this place:

  • Day365

    As we drove towards Finland, the land around us looked more and more like Arctic Tundra, a unique habitat where only a few plants and animals can survive. Vicky remembers learning about in school. Much of it was boggy, with mosses, lichens and short spindly Silver Birches. Even when the snows are melted, permafrost under the topsoil prevents water from draining and roots from growing deeper than about 25cm, making for very difficult growing conditions. The soils in this particular area were sandy and there were even some banks that looked like dunes.

    We entered Finland as we crossed a river. We soon started to see lots of enclosures and in one with some teepee type structures nearby, there was a herd of about 30 reindeer! We weren't intending to stay in Finland, but had cut through the narrow finger extending East-West between Sweden and Norway. We weren't the only ones doing this and local entrepreneurs had tried to lure in the passing trade by setting up several tourist businesses, such as reindeer petting, somewhere called 'Husky Cape' and souvenir shops.

    After about 100km we passed into Norway, the 19th country of our tour and the 10th we plan to do in-depth! Surprisingly quickly the landscape began to change, hills became higher, the roads undulated increasingly and wide, torrential rivers cut deep courses into the tree clad valleys.

    Laybys were larger, picnic sites were signed in advance and several were well off the road, reached via a hard mud track that ran through a corridor of trees. It in was one of these that we made our home for the night, above the swollen and raging Alta-Kautokeino River. The track opened up to a car park with a picnic bench, grass and plenty of interesting smells for Poppy. We spent a peaceful the night with three other vans and the constant ssshhh sound of the flowing water.
    Read more

  • Day373

    Silisjávri Lake, South of Alta

    July 4, 2017 in Norway

    There are many amazing things that we love about Norway; its wilderness, water and wonderful wild camping spots. However, it covers such a large area, and the only roads are sometimes so indirect, that even though we are here for 2 months, if we want to travel the whole country, we are needing to cover an average of 100- 150km every day. This means a lot of time spent sitting in the cab looking at the (admittedly beautiful) road ahead and not as much time for getting out and exploring on foot, bike or canoe.

    Today was one of those big driving days. From the North East, we travelled inland, South West then North towards Alta where we planned to rejoin the coast road. Menacing grey skies brought a dark backdrop to sunlit landscape before the clouds broke and the sunlight was replaced with flashes of thunder and huge raindrops that streamed away to join the already swollen brooks, rivers and waterfalls. There was a distinct lack of reindeer today compared to previous days. Whether they knew of the oncoming storm and had taken refuge in the forests or there were fewer in this part of Norway we don't know.

    We pulled up overlooking the beautiful Silisjávri lake, a relatively shallow body of water bordered by small Silver Birches. It tipped it down for most of the time we were there but at least this kept the mozzies away!
    Read more

  • Day6

    After waking from the first night of wild camping, (amongst snow outside a closed winter lodge in Masi) we woke roughly (first at 4am, then at 9am - the light was equally bright). Then started a cloudy, windy, bone chilling ride to Kautokeino, that included a stop in a Sami shop that included such luxuries as an indoor toilet, tap water and Reindeer Jerky.

    Along the road, we saw (or almost ran into) more reindeer and an Arctic fox.

    Oh, and I got chased by a dog for a out 200 yards (when my legs found new energy).

    As big spenders in our second 'big' city, we treated ourselves to a civilised meal (a burger in a children's restaurant, but it counts to us) and now we are bedding down in a camping lodge.

    Tomorrow - Finland
    Read more

  • Day5

    1st day cycling was a mix of comical incompetence and big payoffs.

    We left the hotel at 1, going the wrong way 3 times before finally finding our way out an hour later.

    I fell off within the first hour, damaging myself and the bike (neither beyond repair)

    After that it looked up (in all senses) as we climbed a mountain beside river rapids in a canyon.

    I Inadvertently herded 30 reindeer, as they panicked at the site of me and ran beside my bike, looking for a way of the road.

    Just as energy was giving out, a Cafe sign appeared on the horizon and there we met a Ukrainian student so interested in our British-ness (go figure) made us Ukrainian stew and fresh coffee for free (a cafetiere, no less!)

    Now, after a camping cooker dinner, we have our first night of camping - tuck in beside a closed winter lodge.

    Good stuff!
    Read more

  • Day3

    Alta to Masi

    May 14, 2016 in Norway

    43 miles under our belts (30 of which were uphill). Met a Sami reindeer herder, rode with a herd of reindeer, saw blue skies and frozen lakes, got fed borsch and coffee by a kind Ukrainian lady, had one crash and one bike malfunction, now set up overlooking a village. Exhausted, but first real day down!

  • Day5

    Masi to Kautokeino

    May 16, 2016 in Norway

    After a fairly restless night which brought in fresh aches, we set off from Masi just after midday. It was a 70km ride to Kautokeino which consisted of steep descents snd climbs throughout the day. The plateau remains fairly sparse in terms of population, but we managed to get water from a caravan site - where we had a good chat with some local who reassured us we'll have a few days off hill climbs when we reach Finland! - and a Sami woman opened her shop especally for Owen to buy dried reindeer meat for lunch. We saw a great number of reindeer which led to us herding thrm at one point as we followed them along the road (also mearly resulting in Owen crashing into one of them). We also saw an artic fox cross our path.

    Two days of pulling 20kg of luggage up hills had us both fairly exhausted so when we arrived in Kautokeino we went out for a meal in a rather classy establishment (see photo for evidence of this) and for a bargain price hired a hut to sleep in - luxury!
    Read more

  • Day7

    Als wir um 7 Uhr auf dem Ikea-Parkplatz erwachen, ist es um uns noch recht ruhig. Außer uns stehen noch 3 weitere Wohnmobile auf dem weitläufigen Parkplatz - es scheint nicht nur in unserem Reiseführer zu stehen. Wir frühstücken und machen uns abreisebereit. Gegen 8:30 Uhr geht es dann los.

    Ab über die unspektakuläre Grenze nach Finnland auf die E8/93 weiter Richtung Norden. Eine Überraschung zu Beginn: Die heutige Route ist kürzer als gedacht: Google sagt ca. 420 km statt 477, wie ich in meiner Reiseplanung geschrieben hatte. Das ist sehr erfreulich, denn leider gibt mein seit 2 Tagen muckender Ischias heute alles und mein rechtes Bein brennt fast von Beginn an. Ich versuche mich nicht zu sehr darauf zu konzentrieren, sondern auf die Fahrt in immer ländlicher werdende Regionen. Es sind 100 km/h erlaubt, wir entscheiden uns aber nach kurzer Zeit aufgrund der holprigen Straßenverhältnisse für 80 km/h. Tempomat rein und fertig, denn Verkehr ist hier Fehlanzeige. Vor und hinter uns meist gähnende Leere und nur ab und zu links und rechts der Straße ein paar Briefkästen, manchmal lässt sich nur erahnen, wo im Wald das zugehörige Haus steht.

    Die Natur hat hier das Sagen wie sich vor allem in dem sehr viel Wasser führenden Fluss Tornionjoki, an dem wir entlangfahren, zeigt. Es ist Hochwasser- oft bis an die Straße ran, aber die Häuser scheinen genau richtig hoch gebaut zu sein. Keines ist überschwemmt.

    Der erste Stop heute: Der Polarkreis! Ein Gasthof, in dem wir die einzigen Gäste sind. Egal, wir kaufen einen Kaffee und einen Kakao und genießen die Sonne, dann geht es weiter.

    Als nächstes machen wir Halt an einem Supermarkt - Suppengemüse steht auf der Liste und Joghurt. Wir werden fündig und nach diesem kurzen Stopp geht es weiter. Wir wollen bis zur Mittagsrast in Muonio sein - dort soll es Stromschnellen geben, die man aus der Nähe betrachten kann. Nach weiteren 2 Stunden Fahrt durch bewaldetes Land fahren wir mangels Schild erstmal an dieser Sehenswürdigkeit vorbei. Vielleicht hat der Winter das Schild auf dem Gewissen, Schnee scheint es hier viel zu geben, sonst wäre wahrscheinlich der Fluss auch nicht so voll. Schließlich führt Google uns doch noch zu den Stromschnellen.
    Am Ufer angekommen, trete ich ehrfürchtig erst einmal einen Schritt zurück. Der Fluss ist riesig und fließt so schnell mit starker Strömung, dass meine Augen irgendwie nicht mitkommen. Wahnsinnige Naturgewalt, die einen staunen lässt und auch - zumindest für mich - ein wenig beängstigend erscheint je näher ich ans Geländer trete.
    Der Platz im Wald ist jedoch wunderschön, es gibt eine Picknickbank und wir sind bis auf zwei weitere Touristen mit Hund ganz allein. Wir lassen uns das Mittagsmahl an diesem besonderen Ort schmecken und brechen dann langsam wieder auf. Gut 150 km liegen noch vor uns.

    Die Straße hat sich inzwischen deutlich gebessert, alles neu asphaltiert, hier ist der Reiseführer nicht ganz up to date. Wir tanken in Muonio für günstige 1,37 €/l (im Vergleich zu gestern in Schweden ca. 18 Cent weniger) und fahren dann weiter Richtung Norwegen.
    Unterwegs sehen wir heute so einige Rentiere - sie grasen seelenruhig neben der zum Glück wenig befahrenen Landstraße. Ein toller Anblick!

    Zwischendrin erfasst uns der Ausläufer eines kräftigen Schauers - ein wahres Naturschauspiel, weil Drumherum blauer Himmel glänzt und die Sonne scheint.
    Gegen 15:45 Uhr erreichen wir schließlich die norwegische Grenze. Sie ist offen und wir fahren einfach durch. Lediglich die LKWs müssen sich wohl einer Zollprüfung unterziehen.
    Nun sind es noch 50 km bis zum Ziel: Ein Samicamp in Kautokeino - wir sind gespannt.

    In Norwegen werden die Straßen nun kurviger und die Landschaft rauer. Um 16:30 Uhr erreichen wir das Camp - alles zu. Ein einsames Wohnmobil parkt auf der großen, allerdings abgesperrten Wiese. Hm...an der Tür steht die Rezeption öffnet in der Nebensaison von 17-19 Uhr. Wir warten und erkunden das Gelände. Es gibt einen recht neuen Sanitärbereich, der allerdings ziemlich kalt ist und eine coole, etwas abgerockte Küche in einer Holzhütte. Alles etwas ursprünglich und ungewohnt, aber brauchbar. Um 17 Uhr kommt tatsächlich ein junger Mann vielleicht um die 20 zu unserem Auto und fragt, ob wir über Nacht bleiben wollen und Strom brauchen. Der Preis würde 290 NOK betragen. Wir willigen ein und er deutet auf einen Steckdosenverteiler, der bei der geschlossenen Rezeption aus dem Fenster ragt. Er sagt er hätte keinen Schlüssel für das Haus, wir könnten aber einfach hier vorn stehen und den Strom dort anschließen. Warum nicht? Zum Kassieren würde er später wieder kommen.

    Wir schließen also den Strom an und genehmigen uns eine heiße Dusche. Dann beeilen wir uns in die Küche zu kommen, denn später soll es gewittern und wir wollen uns für die Tage eine Kartoffelsuppe zubereiten. Das klappt auch alles wunderbar. Während die Suppe köchelt, genießen wir die Reste vom Couscous mit Gemüse und den Nudeln der Vortage. Es ist sogar so warm, dass wir draußen essen können.
    Nachdem wir die Küche wieder in den Originalzustand versetzt haben, rolle ich neben dem Wohnmobil die Gymnastikmatte aus und dehne meinen schmerzenden Ischias. Nach knapp 30 Min. tröpfelt es leicht und wir verziehen uns in unser Gefährt. Als es kurz danach wieder aufhört, entscheiden wir uns noch für einen Spaziergang und landen schließlich nochmal im Supermarkt - Frischkäse ist aus, der wurde heute Vormittag vergessen.

    Die frische Luft tat gut und nun kann der Abend ruhig ausklingen.

    Gegen 21 Uhr stehen dann der junge Mann und ein Mädchen (vielleicht seine Schwester) wieder am Auto. Wir zahlen mit Kreditkarte auf einem mobilen Gerät und erhalten umgehend die Rechnung per Mail - so viel technischer Fortschritt mitten in der Einöde, das ist Norwegen!
    Read more

You might also know this place by the following names:

Kautokeino, Guovdageaidnu

Join us:

FindPenguins for iOS FindPenguins for Android

Sign up now