Russia
State Kremlin Palace

Here you’ll find travel reports about State Kremlin Palace. Discover travel destinations in Russia of travelers writing a travel blog on FindPenguins.

11 travelers at this place:

  • Day3

    Privet Moskve

    April 3 in Russia

    Privet!

    Well I have had almost 48 hours in Moscow, let's get you caught up with what I've gotten up to.

    Day 1
    I had an early start today as I had to find the Real Russian offices, located in the north of the city, to pick up my train tickets from Ulan-Ude (Russia) to Ulanbator (Mongolia). I initially thought I could walk there but after consulting my trusty Maps.Me app I realised the metro would be the more sensible option. This time my metro journey involved a change of line. I found the first line (purple) easily and travelled the two stops to change onto the orange line. The metro stopped and I got off and saw that the orange line was leaving on the opposite platform, result! I got on the train felt very happy with myself. That was until it pulled into the next station and I realised I was travelling in the wrong direction! I quickly got off and thought I could just cross the platform and travel back the other way on the same line, like on the tube in London. Well Moscow hasn't quite followed the same logic. To find the same line travelling the other way you have to go upstairs, over the platform you were on and down to the other side. It makes much more sense... So after working out that little quirk I found the right train going in the right direction and was on my way again. After exiting the subway I followed the directions I'd been given and found the Real Russia offices, on the third floor of a nondescript building, in a random residential looking suburb, and picked up my tickets. Now I could actually start some sightseeing.
    I got the metro back to the centre of the city to Kitay-Gorod square where I had been informed that the Moscow Free Walking Tour would meet. On my return journey I noticed another quirk of the metro here. Unlike in London there are no station names on the walls when the train comes to each stop. The only way you know which station you are at is from the overhead announcement which is in Russian and English (though only from last year). So if you didn't understand Russian or English, you may well get lost down there... I later learned on the tour that the station names are on the floor... of course!
    The Moscow Free Walking Tour was fantastic, an absolute must if you come to the city. Most capital cities have these tours and they are a brilliant way of getting your bearings in the city from a local. Our guide, Elena, was so enthusiastic and rally engaged us for the whole 2.5 hour tour. We learnt a brief history of the city and Russia in general, saw the main sites - St Basil's cathedral (which is actually called "The Cathedral of the Intercession of the Most Holy Theotokos on the Moat"... I can't imagine why they would shorten that...), the Kremlin and Red Square. On the tour I met a lovely Mexican girl and chatted with her most of the way between each stop. This is one of the best things about these tours. There are always fellow solo travellers to meet and become friends with.
    After the tour I had a quick lunch and then went to see the Kremlin. The only way I can describe it would be to imagine if a smaller version of Buckingham Palace plus 10 downing street plus a few churches and other admin buildings were clumped together and then surrounded by a wall. It is basically a self contained hamlet within a city, with streets and official cars driving around. I walked around for about 20 minutes, took some pictures and then left, as there wasn't really a huge amount to see.
    The final stop of the day was the Museum of Societ Arcade Games (as seen on Travel Man with Richard Ayoade and Greg Davies). You pay about £6 to go inside and get given some old Russian coins to use on the machines and a map of each game and how to play. Most of the games were very confusing or didn't appear to work properly. But there were a couple that I managed to work out. As far as random kitsch museums go this one was quite good and I would recommend it, especially as its nice and warm inside!

    Day 2
    My second day in the city started with a visit to Lenin's Mausoleum, which for the small cost of queueing outside in the cold for 20 minutes (longer if you don't get there 20 minutes before it opens I the morning) you can see the perfectly preserved ACTUAL BODY OF LENIN! Seriously. Think a creepier version of Madame Tussauds with the irrational fear that he's going to suddenly open his eyes and go "boo!" (or the Russian equivalent. Let's just say I'm glad you are only allowed about a minute inside, walking around him in single file.
    After that jaunty start to the day I then made my way across the river to Gorky Park (Moscow's version of Hyde Park) where there is an open air statue museum just before it, with statues of Gandhi and Einstein among others. It was refreshing walking around the quiet park away from the hustle of the city centre.
    There are only so many pictures you can take of random statues though, so after a while I headed back to the centre for some lunch and managed to stumble across a vegetarian café and filled up with a soy meat wrap and a quinoa salad and had some much needed wifi time to get my bearings. By chance I had stopped nearby a shopping mall that had a viewing deck on the roof and so headed there to see Moscow from above. By this point I am starting to get quite tired (20,000 steps a day after a home average of 1,500 will do that to you!) and so decided to call it a day and head back to the hostel to recoup before my first overnight train to Kazan. And that is where I am writing this from.

    So there you have it folks. Moscow in a 48 hour nutshell.
    Apologies for the long post... I seem to have word vomit.

    Until next time.
    Dosvidaniya!
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  • Day18

    Red Square

    April 23 in Russia

    We mooched around in the apartment for a bit and then decided to head out and reacquaint ourselves with The Red Square. The wind seemed to have died down a bit which made walking more pleasant.

    There was lots of activity in the Red Square from both tourists and also workmen. They were setting up seats and looked like they were cleaning the Kremlin walls and tidying up the place. Lenin’s mausoleum was ensconced bu scaffolding and stuff! At first we thought it was for the world cup but we found out later it was preparation for Victory Day parade and celebrations which is when they parade their military and weapons through the street. We just wandered around and enjoyed the atmosphere - went for a wander over the bridge and then crossed the road to check out some filming that was going on. A lady who seemed to be with the film group said it was a Mexican TV series.

    We decided it was time to look for dinner so we roamed the streets for an appropriate eating place. The few on the Red Square has exorbitant prices so we decided to walk down the mall there instead. Again they had pretty fairy lights and butterflies - this is another mall, not the one I have referred to before.

    We eventually settled on a restaurant which specialised in steaks. It was only after we’d ordered drinks though that the menu was explained more clearly - most cuts of meat had a minimum weight to be ordered. It was about $20 for 100g of the cheapest cut and you had to order a minimum of 400 - 800g. This seemed a very strange way to run a menu and quite expensive! So we just had drinks here and ended up going to a cafe we’d previously had breakfast at and ordering something light as it was getting late and Heidi was tired.

    Eli walked home with Heidi and I walked for a bit with Mike and Kyria enjoying the night lights before heading home with a nice hot cup of cocoa.

    We looked outside our apartment windows before we went to bed and they had blocked off the main road and soldiers were lining the road - spaced out, they seemed to be doing measurements and stuff. I guess in preparation for their victory day.
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  • Day14

    Sochi

    June 24 in Russia

    Frequent stops and occasionally we can hop off to buy something to eat.
    Catherine and Matt from Melbourne who we kept bumping into. Their daughter Sophia (4) still asleep.
    Me asleep, thanjs Brownie.
    The first class carriage was still a bit squeezy and the bed narrow but much preferred to the boredom and monotony of an airport.
    But overnight the landscape has changed from the vast Russian plains farmed and forested to lush mountains with wide and flowing rivers to the shores of the Black Sea.
    Its Sunday and the beaches are full.
    Our motel The Razin is small but clean, comfortable and a lazy fifteen minutes to the beaches past fruit stalls, park vendors and happy beach going families.
    My first ever swim iin the Black Sea and remembered it had to be salt.
    The city would have to be the Amalfi of Russia, pebbly beaches but great swimming and wonderful promenade, seafood restaurants and cafes, and shops of all sorts for all the girls.
    That is a confectionary shop and the confectionary is a cherry flavoured jelly filled with walnuts.
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  • Day7

    26.-29.08.2016 - Moskau, Russland

    August 30, 2016 in Russia

    Die Kurzfassung, Moskau:

    Eindrücklicher Kreml, wunderschoene Basilik-Kathedrale, Militaer-Musikfestival auf dem roten Platz mit Feuerwerk-Show, FreeWalking Tour durch die Stadt, Unterwegs mit Ines und Sarah aus Deutschland und Aline von Moskau, das geniale Wetter in den riesigen Gruen-Parkanlagen geniessen, Russische Essens-Spezialitaeten ausprobieren, Party-Hochburg Moskau, rund um den Kreml und quer durch Moskau mit dem Velo, Gemuetliche Abendstunden im Hostel mit musizierenden Russen und und und.. =) sowie offizieller Start meiner Transsib-Zugreise.Read more

  • Day110

    Kremlin

    October 8, 2017 in Russia

    Kremlin, in Russian, simply means fortress, and historically, every town and city had one. Today, saying "Kremlin" implies this one in Moscow that is the seat of government. All the pics are taken inside the Kremlin except the first one which catches the changing of the guard at the Kremlin gates. The second is the Senate building (with no senators) . This is where the Russian President's office. Unfortunately, Mr. Putin was too tied up to see me. ;o)) The next was built by Kruschev as the Hall of the Congress of the Soviet Communist Party. It is now an office building, since the purpose for which it was built no longer exists. Then a couple of the cathedrals within the Kremlin walls (no interior pictures were permitted). These are the Cathedral of the Annunciation and Dormition Cathedral, if I remember rightly. Finally one picture of the Kremlin Gardens. All in all, and extraordinary place.Read more

You might also know this place by the following names:

National Kremlin Palace, Staatlicher Kremlpalast, State Kremlin Palace, Государственный Кремлёвский Дворец

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