Sweden
Jokkmokks Kommun

Here you’ll find travel reports about Jokkmokks Kommun. Discover travel destinations in Sweden of travelers writing a travel blog on FindPenguins.

16 travelers at this place:

  • Day476

    More driving today, turning away from the coast and heading northwest inland towards Jokkmokk. About 4 hours to get there, where we started exploring the Laponia region WHS. This is a series of national parks that has great scenery and home to the indigenous Saami people as well - nomadic reindeer herders.

    It was cold and rain/snow were in the forecast so we opted for a cabin instead of just camping tonight. Nothing flash, just a basic room with a bathroom! Once that was sorted we spent the afternoon checking out a nearby national park, though it was mostly taiga forest and boreal tundra type terrain - densely packed and not super interesting sadly.

    Though we did cross the Arctic Circle on our way into Jokkmokk! I didn't realise but it's actually the line above which you get the midnight sun at least once (and the polar night during winter as well). So it's not a fixed point, but actually moves around year by year. But we're definitely above it - shame it was cloudy tonight and not visible.
    Read more

  • Day359

    The Arctic Circle!

    June 20, 2017 in Sweden

    It was the day before midsummer and we were looking forward to crossing the Artic Circle! Sweden is so vast and sparsely populated that the road network is very spread out, meaning there weren't many opportunities for Vicky to take a wrong turning! We therefore set the sat nav to display the coordinates of our position and continued North West on the 97 towards Jokkmokk, watching the longitude count up the degrees and minutes.

    The Arctic Circle, the southernmost latitude from where the midnight sun can be seen on the summer solstice, moves north and south in an oscillation that is 180km wide and lasts 40,000 years. There is a shorter oscillation too and both are controlled by the gravitational pulls of the sun, moon and planets. The line is currently on a northwards track at 66°33.778'.

    At the midpoint of the large oscillation we pulled into a rest area that had a sign and information. Flagpoles stood along the line and darker flagstones ran through a modern looking, wooden pyramidal shelter to mark it out. We'd been planning and looking forward to visiting the Arctic for years so were very excited! Our mental health is something we both need to actively manage and at exciting times like these we both need to keep an awareness of Will's bipolar, assessing whether his high is a direct result of what is happening and within reasonable limits or whether it has escalated. We thought there was no better way to show this in photos than Will standing across the polar line. We feel very glad that since we've been travelling, it has been easier to spot early warning signs and therefore manage our mental health effectively.

    Several other vans used the rest area while we were parked (they make up a significant proportion of vehicles on the road up here). We talked to a Norwegian couple who lived near Nordkapp, one of the most northerly points in Europe. They said Spring had been late this year and the snow had only just melted from the lowlands, although it was still on the mountains. Talking of snow, the temperature had turned perceptibly colder, so we lunched inside the van before driving on and crossing the current line of longitude into the Arctic!
    Read more

  • Day359

    An Arctic Midsummer at Vajkijaure

    June 20, 2017 in Sweden

    Approaching the town of Jokkmokk we could hardly believe our eyes when we passed a small herd of reindeer grazing the verge just meters away from the road! We'd been keeping our eyes peeled for them and for elk, but hadn't expected to see them in this context.

    Our overnight spot was about 5km beyond the town, a stone's throw from Vajkijaure reservoir. Being midsummer's eve we'd planned to have a traditional Swedish köttbullar (meatballs) dish, but in our excitement we'd forgotten to buy potatoes, so Will put his excess energy to good use and cycled back to fetch them, narrowly dodging the rain showers.

    We had very much hoped to see the midnight sun but although it was definitely daylight, the sky was full of rain clouds that blotted out the sun. We'd also thought we might have a midnight canoe or swim but the intermittent rain, the cold and wind dissuaded us. As is sometimes the case with highly anticipated events such as summer solstice in the Artic, the idea can overtake the reality.

    Rain mixed with hail woke us on Midsummer's Day and warned us of the cold Artic wind that had set in. It was definitely a day to turn the heating on and snuggle up in a throw, unlike the scorching summer's day back in the UK! The weather meant it wasn't suitable for canoeing, so after a morning of relaxing and watching the Goldeneyes diving for food in the reservoir, we wrapped up and took a walk along the shore.

    As we were reaching the dam, sirens began to wail and a thunderous rush of water was heard as one of the floodgates began to open. We were able to look down on the raging torrent and walk downriver in time to see the second gate open and the white water surge forward. The dam and outbuildings had been decorated by a few high profile artists to symbolise the way of life of Sweden's indigenous people; the Sami. The paintings showed a drum covered in symbols, representations of the Sami gods and a reindeer caravan. The Sami are reindeer herders and we found out the animals we'd seen earlier were probably in the area to be branded.

    Walking a little further we explored some deserted forest trails (possibly made by the reindeer) before returning to the van, picking up some driftwood on the way. After warming up and getting some food in us, Will lit a fire in one of the concrete fire pits and we sat watching the flames, feeling our cheeks become rosy with the heat. Two fishers approached us to check we knew the Swedes celebrate midsummer on Friday, we did, but explained that in England it is celebrated today and that we were planning to celebrate both! Will played a couple of songs on his guitar before we retreated to the comfort of Martha Motorhome.
    Read more

  • Day2

    Husky Tour

    January 27 in Sweden

    Es geht zur Husky Tour - von weitem hört man die Hunde schon ... nach kurzer Einweisung gibt’s noch dicke Overalls (nicht für mich - Danke TOK 😉) und nach Meinung der Guides dicke Boots (Stiefel) damit wir keine kalten Füße bekommen (wir hatten zum Schluss Eisfüsse in den Dingern - unsere Schuhe wären 100 mal besser gewesen - aber egal)
    Dann geht’s zu den Schlitten in denen die Hunde schon ungeduldig warten, ziehen, springen und jaulen in der sehnsüchtigen Erwartung dass es doch endlich losgehen sollte.
    Dann geht’s endlich los - wir fahren über zugefrorene Seen und verschneite Wälder - eine märchenhafte Winterlandschaft.
    Nach ca. 1 Std. halten wir an einem Tippi (sieht aus wie ein Indianerzelt). Hier gibt’s einen ganz rustikalen Imbiss. Matti, Stina und Patrick (unsere Guides) entfachen im Zelt ein kleines Feuer und dann wird über offener Flamme gegrillt, Wasser für Tee und Kaffee gekocht...
    Da es schon nach 16 Uhr ist (um 14:50 war Sonnenuntergang) fahren wir in der Dämmerung zurück zum Ausgangspunkt.

    Ein wahrlich wunderschönes Erlebnis...

    Hier noch einige Daten zur Tour:
    - Gefahrene Strecke ca. 16 km
    - 4 Personen + Fahrer pro Schlitten
    - 3 Schlitten
    - 12 Hunde pro Schlitten
    - Matti und Stina haben 57 Hunde
    Read more

  • Day1

    Nördlicher Polarkreis

    January 26 in Sweden

    Mehrfach müssen wir anhalten oder langsam fahren - Grund hierfür- Rentiere die gemütlich auf der Straße spazieren und sich von einem Bus nicht aus der Ruhe bringen lassen.

    Kurz vor Jokkmokk erreichen wir den Nördlichen Polarkreis - wir halten an und verlassen alle den Bus und stellen uns südlich des Polarkreises auf - mit einem kräftigen Sprung überqueren wir ihn...

    Anschließend singt unser Fahrer Tor auf Schwedisch noch ein Lied und wir stoßen alle zusammen mit schwedischem Vodka an.

    Skål
    Read more

  • Day3

    Rentierfarm Vajmart

    January 28 in Sweden

    Auf dem Weg zur Farm überqueren wir wieder den Polarkreis...
    Hier muss jetzt mal erwähnt werden dass hier die Straßen alle schneebedeckt sind, gestreut wird gar nicht - unser Busfahrer Tor fährt mit dem Bus als wenn die Straße trocken ist... Sagenhaft...

    Auf der Farm begrüßen uns Helena und Richard. Die beiden Sami Geschwister betreiben die Farm seit Generationen und auch deren Kinder sind schon mit dabei...
    Wir lernen viel über die Kultur und das Leben der Sami (indigenes Volk Lapplands) und der Rentierhirten.
    „Als Rentierhirte wirst du nie Millionär, aber du bist immer ein freier Mensch“ erklärt uns Richard. Weiter führt er fort: „Du kannst es nicht lernen Rentierhirte zu sein, du wirst dazu geboren“

    Man ist oft alleine in der Tundra um nach der Herde zu sehen und auf sie aufzupassen. Nur kranke, alte, verwaiste und verletzte Rene leben auf der Farm. Die Herde ist immer frei im Umland und so muss man täglich mit dem Schneemobil die Herde umrunden (eine Runde ca 40 -50 km) um zu sehen, ob alles in Ordnung ist.

    Die größten Feinde der Rene sind Wolf, Luchs, Vielfraß, Bär und der Adler. (Wobei nur Wolf und Bär an ausgewachsene Rene gehen)

    Zum Abschluss sitzen wir alle zusammen in einem großen Tippi und es gibt ein traditionelles Essen:
    Rentierfleisch auf Fladenbrot mit Blaubeersoße.

    Dies mag jetzt etwas krass klingen, aber die Sami leben mit der Natur und den Rene im Einklang. Wenn ein Ren geschlachtet wird ist dies eine Notwendigkeit und es wird mit entsprechendem Respekt getan, ebenso wird alles vom Ren verwendet...

    Helena und Richard erzählen uns weiter vom
    Hirtenleben - im Mai wenn die Jungtiere geboren werden, zieht die Herde weiter nach Norden und die ganze Hirtenfamilie zieht ihnen nach um auf die Herde aufzupassen - die Jungtiere sind besonders gefährdet (nur 40% kommen durch)
    Hierzu wird die Familie mit dem Hubschrauber zu den Weidegründen geflogen - da es hier weder Straßen, Wege oder sonstiges gibt. Ebenso sieht es mit Handyempfang oder ähnlichem aus. Die einzige Kommunikation zur „Zivilisation“ ist ein Funkgerät und ein Satelitentelefon. Dieses wird nur für den Notfall benutzt da die Verbindungen sehr teuer sind...

    Es war ein sehr schönes und interessantes Erlebnis welches wir nicht vergessen werden...
    Read more

  • Day3

    Nachdem wir von der Rentierfarm zurück sind geht es nach kurzem aufwärmen wieder raus in die Kälte ( -10: für hier Bikini Wetter)

    Leider hat es mit den Polarlichtern (Aurora Borealis) nicht geklappt - es ist wie gestern komplett bewölkt und die Sonnenwinde waren auch nicht stark genug - so das, selbst bei klarem Himmel, nur eine 5%ige Wahrscheinlichkeit bestand überhaupt welche zu sehen...

    Naja dann müssen wir wohl wiederkommen...👍

    Damit Werners Unterweisung für Nachtaufnahmen nicht ganz umsonst war, nehmen wir Kamera, Stativ etc. mit und machen ein paar Nachtaufnahmen von Jokkmokk und Umgebung.

    Außerdem haben wir Tretschlitten vom Hotel mitgenommen, um diese zu testen - was ein Spaß - mit Anna ging zum Schluss der Italiener durch und sie hat einen satten Abflug hingelegt 😂 - hat aber außer einem blauen Fleck & Beule keinen Schaden davon getragen...

    Wie jeden Abend, machen wir es uns auch heute am offenen Kamin im Hotel gemütlich...
    Read more

  • Day58

    Jokkmokk

    August 17, 2017 in Sweden

    Small town right at the arctic circle. A center of or meeting place for Sami culture. Right now the annual reindeer herders Congress is in process here. Unfortunately, it rained heavily yesterday and I wimped out. So the only pics are the town common and statue (that is sadly in the shade). Outdoors folks will enjoy this part of the world as much about the Sami and the culture has to do with living in this environment, the flora and fauna that make it possible and how it all functions together. In other words, ecology. And this time, including human presence in and interaction with, this environmentRead more

  • Day57

    Inlandsbanan day one

    August 16, 2017 in Sweden

    The Inlandbanan is a passenger rail that runs in the summer along a route through the middle of Sweden. I am spending 4 days along the route and will post pictures along the way. Today, the train chased a reindeer off the tracks, but my picture didn't come out. Most of this part of the trip was through national parks and one of the largest bogs in Europe and is included in the UNESCO cultural area of Laponia, what I knew as Lapland growing.Read more

You might also know this place by the following names:

Jokkmokks Kommun

Join us:

FindPenguins for iOS FindPenguins for Android

Sign up now