United States
Ainahau Triangle

Here you’ll find travel reports about Ainahau Triangle. Discover travel destinations in the United States of travelers writing a travel blog on FindPenguins.

11 travelers at this place:

  • Day7

    Driving Miss Brenda

    October 25, 2016 in the United States

    On Tuesday we rented a car with the intent of driving to the North Shore to see the sights there. Before leaving, Brenda came across an App that acts as a tour guide and indicates points of interest along the way. We coughed up our $6.49 CDN and downloaded the Oahu Shaka Guide onto my smartphone. It turned out to be one of the best investments we made here. The guide took us way off the beaten track to places we never would have seen, pointed out recommended eateries and filled the trip with interesting stories of Hawaiian kings, legends and gods.

    The first stop the guide recommended was to a small gift shop that offered samples of different flavours of Macadamia nuts and Kona coffee. We knew from that point on that we had made a wise purchase!

    As we headed north, we saw Chinaman's hat, learned about the formation of the rugged and beautiful Koolau mountain range and made a quick stop at the very tourist oriented Polynesian Cultural Center.

    At the northernmost tip of the island is the town of Laie where we visited the largest Mormon temple outside of Salt Lake City. There is a huge Mormon population here. We also saw another of Mother Nature's works of art in the form of a sea arch that, according to legend, is actually the remains of the tail of a giant lizard that was killed by the legendary warrior Kana and his magic spear, cut into three pieces and thrown into the sea. Hmmm...I think the ancient Hawaiians may have been into the Maui Wowee.

    Our first glimpse of surfers came at Sunset beach where 10-15 foot tall waves were breaking along the shoreline. We were very impressed until we made our next stop at the Banzai Pipeline where the waves were even bigger and actually formed tubes that the surfers skilfully dove in and out of. In the winter months, waves here can crest at 30 feet! And if the thought of wiping out under that many tons of water isn't enough, there is a jagged coral reef beneath the surface where the waves break. I'll give it a pass, thanks.

    We were then guided inland and up a steep hill to the remains of an ancient temple, in Hawaiian a Luakini Heaiu, in which sacrificial ceremonies and even human sacrifices were performed to help ensure warrior's success in wars. The volcanic rocks that formed the 400 year old temple were hauled up the steep hill from the valley below.

    Back to the seashore and our next stop, Laniakea Beach where we saw a couple of sea turtles frolicking in the waves. The water was too rough for swimming, so we didn't stay there too long.

    Like visiting the Eiffel Tower in Paris or the Coliseum in Rome, one must have a Shave Ice when in Hawaii. In the town of Haleiwa we visited the iconic Matsumoto's Shave Ice and, after waiting n line for 20 minutes, we were served our treats. Brenda had ordered the Matsumoto special that was flavoured with pineapple, lemon and coconut. When she got her order, she thought they had given her the wrong one. It was coloured blue, yellow and red. She went back to the counter and they confirmed they got it right. The pineapple syrup is blue. Go figure. Anyway, the overall effect was very pretty and reflected the abundance of rainbows here. Mine was passionfruit, coconut and papaya with a sprinkling of condensed milk over the top. Quite tasty, but I don't really need to have another anytime soon.

    Our next to last stop was at the Dole plantation. With my love of pineapple, I was very anxious to arrive there, sample some of the fruit and maybe even buy a few pineapples for the coming days. I figured the price here would have to be better than in town, right? No middleman, no transport costs, no carrying fees etc, etc... WRONG!!! They were selling boxes containing two large pineapples for over $15.00 US. Robbery. Needless to say, we spent very little time there.

    Our last stop was an "off the beaten track" visit to the geographical center of Oahu which symbolizes the human belly button. The birthstones of Kukaniloko are located here and it was believed that women birthing here could do so with ease and no pain because of the magical powers emanating from the stones. Kukaniloko means "to anchor the cry from within". The women would squat atop one of the stones and had to push their babies out without flinching. These babies would often grow up to become chiefs and leaders of their villages.

    Overall it was a very entertaining day and I would recommend the Shaka Guide to anyone visiting Hawaii.
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  • Day2

    It's How Much?!?

    October 20, 2016 in the United States

    Our plane left YVR about 20 minutes late at 6:05 PM and we landed in Oahu at 9:10 local time. Air Canada never ceases to amaze me with their cost cutting measures. Despite this being a nearly 6 hour flight, there was no complimentary meal offered and no free booze. OK, I've gotten used to that one already, but on this flight, there was no in seat entertainment offered. Unless you had the Air Canada app installed on your computer or smart phone, you could not access the movies they were streaming on board. However, they were more than happy to rent you an iPad for $10.00. What's next, pay toilets? Anyway, by the time we de-planed and made it to our lodging, it was well past 10:00. which was, of course, 1:00 Vancouver time. Needless to say, we didn't do anything that first night but unpack and go to sleep.

    We rented a small condo very close to Waikiki Beach which, as it turns out, has spectacular views from it's 41st floor balcony. We awoke to a beautiful sunny day, around 24 degrees, and decided to make a Costco run to stock our pantry and buy some Champagne for our anniversary celebration. On the way to Costco we walked through Chinatown and did a little shopping there. That's when the sticker shock hit us. Fruits prices here are the same, or ofen more expensive, than they are in Vancouver! And they're in US dollars!!! And the same thing applies to restaurants. We stopped in a little Chinese restaurant for a plate of Lo Bac and a plate of Chow Fun and the bill worked out to be about $20.00 CDN. We knew coming in that things were expensive here, but we didn't realize HOW expensive. As a matter of fact, what we're paying for 12 nights accommodations here would cover our entire 3 month stay in Thailand this coming winter.

    But what can you do? Ya can't take it with ya.

    After our lunch, we continued on to Costo, further filled our bellies with store d'oeuvres (several trips to the organic dried coconut chunk lady) and picked up a few staples. You know, Costco is Costco pretty much anywhere you go, but the most striking deals available here were in the booze with wines and liquor at less than half the price of what the would be back home. So they can import Veuve Cliquot from France and sell it for $38.00 but they charge you $5.00 for a locally grown pineapple. Go figure.

    Sticker shock aside, Hawaii reminds us of Thailand, but with money. The weather is great, the locals are very friendly and helpful and the overall vibe is fantastic. The infrastructure here is as good as anywhere in the world, which is where Hawaii has it all over Thailand. But alas, the comforts of home come at a cost.
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Ainahau Triangle

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