Iceland
Laugar

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14 travelers at this place

  • Jul28

    Grafarkirkja, Akureyi, and Godafoss

    Yesterday in Iceland ⋅ ☁️ 48 °F

    We were able to see Grafarkirkja in North Iceland today. It’s the oldest turf church in Iceland. Parts of the church date back to the 1600's, while the rest is from 1884. The black trim has an old Norse design that was carved by a well-known wood carver of the time, Guðmundur Guðmundsson. Back in the olden days, Icelanders used to live in turf houses and the churches were made of turf. Now only a handful of turf churches remain in Iceland. The wind was calm (and the midges didn't attack us) so I was able to use the drone. 🙂

    We then drove around the peninsula through Siglufjordur and into Akureyi for lunch. Akureyi is the second largest city in Iceland and it’s smaller than Olympia. 😳

    After lunch we drove to Godafoss on the Skjalfandafljot river. The name Goðafoss means either waterfall of the gods or waterfall of the 'goði' (i.e. priest/ chieftain). The reason for this is its fascinating history.

    When Iceland was first settled in the 9th and 10th Centuries, the vast majority (who were not slaves, at least) were Norwegians who followed the Old Norse religion, worshipping deities like Thor, Odin, Loki and Freya. However, after the Commonwealth was established in 930 AD, pressure to convert began to push from Christianising Europe.

    By 1000 AD, it seemed that Norway would almost certainly invade if the country were to stand by their pagan beliefs. The issue was thus discussed at Þingvellir, where the parliament met once a year. The lawspeaker at the time, the Ásatrú priest (or goði) Þorgeir Ljósvetningagoði, was given the responsibility to make the decision.

    It is said he lay under a fur blanket for a day and a night in silence, praying to his Old Gods for the right decision. Eventually, he emerged and said, for the good of the people, Christianity would be the official religion, but pagans could practice in private. To symbolise his decision, he returned to his home in north Iceland and threw idols of the Old Gods into a beautiful waterfall. Since then, it would be known as Goðafoss.

    We are camped 10 minutes away from Godafoss in Laugar. Tomorrow, we head to the Mývatn.
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  • Day8

    Goðafoss (Göttlicher Wasserfall)

    August 4, 2019 in Iceland ⋅ ☁️ 8 °C

    Nach ca. 1 1/2 Std. Busfahrt konnten wir unseren 2. Wasserfall (Göttmicher Wasserfall) besichtigen. Das Wasser des Skjálfandafljót stürzt über einer Breite von 158 m, die von drei Felsen unterbrochen wird, etwa 11 m in einem weiten Bogen in die Tiefe.Read more

    Margit Geistl

    🙋🤗😍

    8/7/19Reply
    Margit Geistl

    Wahnsinn! Total schön!

    8/7/19Reply
     
  • Day8

    Laugar

    March 26, 2016 in Iceland ⋅ ☁️ 0 °C

    I've been taking white on white pictures all day. Yesterday's blizzard around Olafsfjordur never let up and we woke to snow everywhere. Thank goodness Iceland does a better job clearing the roads than Denver. Still, it felt like a fierce, winding drive around the cliffs overhanging the fjords, back down to Akureyri.

    That, however, was nothing compared to the drive I just undertook back from Myvatn Nature Baths this evening. The white on white landscape, where the ground, mountains, and sky all bled into one, turned into complete darkness, where only the driving snow 10 feet in front of my face was visible. To the right: nothing. To the left: nothing. Above me: nothing. Ahead of me: nothing. To either side of the road, the little snow posts had pieces of reflective tape at the top, the only things guiding me through the vast void I was driving through. As the road sloped up into apparent nothingness, I felt like I was slowly driving into heaven.

    The nature baths, themselves, were also a bit transcendent. Situated at lake Myvatn, the sulfury water had that unreal blue, slightly opaque tinge to it. The cold snowy day created steam off the water obscuring everything and casting it mysteriously. Jennifer and I soaked and soaked. The hot water coming out of a pipe felt like a deep tissue massage. We followed it up in their cafeteria with a sampling of the local geyser bread - rye bread baked in the ground geothermally. It's a flat, dark rye, which is covered in butter and smoked trout. Very much hit the spot.

    A lovely end to a beautiful day of driving through this exceptional landscape. On the way we stopped at Godafoss, meaning waterfall of the gods. While not the largest or tallest, it is considered one of the most beautiful, crashing through a lava field. In the year 1000, the law speaker Porgeir was forced to decide on Iceland's national religion. After 24 hours of meditation, he decided on Christianity. Afterward, he tossed all his pagan carvings of the Norse gods into the waterfall.
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    Lorna McMurray

    Hey you two snowflakes!

    3/26/16Reply
    Lorna McMurray

    i was in a scary driving situation like that before only it was heavy, heavy fog

    3/26/16Reply
    Randy Reames

    Wow!

    3/27/16Reply
     
  • Day3

    Erste Nacht in Narfastaðir

    July 9, 2020 in Iceland ⋅ 🌧 16 °C

    Unsere erste Nacht verbrachten wir in einem Farm Hotel. Wir hatten ein riesiges Zimmer und fühlten uns herzlich willkommen. Es waren leider nur drei Familien dort. Viel Ruhe durch Corona. Das Hotel wurde von einem Ehepaar geführt die sich sehr um uns bemühten. Die Gegend war wunderschön. Man sah grüne Wiesen rundherum.
    Abends gab es Tüten Suppe und Dosenbrot.
    Morgens hatten die beiden uns tatsächlich ein Buffet aufgebaut.
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Laugar