Mexico
Morelos

Here you’ll find travel reports about Morelos. Discover travel destinations in Mexico of travelers writing a travel blog on FindPenguins.

44 travelers at this place:

  • Day6

    Vulkane von oben

    May 29 in Mexico ⋅ 🌫 23 °C

    Wenn auch nur aus dem Fenster unseres Flugzeugs, haben wir doch noch die beiden Vulkane 🌋 Popocatépetl und Iztaccíhuatl gesehen. Popocatépetl (rechts im Bild) bedeutet übrigens „Rauchender Berg, Iztaccíhuatl (links im Bild) heißt „Weiße Frau“.

  • Day56

    Teotihuacan

    September 22 in Mexico ⋅ ⛅ 12 °C

    Faith hat für fünf aus unsere Gruppe online einen englischsprachigen Tagesausflug nach „Teotihuacan*“ gebucht. Erstaunlicherweise ist dieses UNESCO Weltkulturerbe im Nordosten von México City nicht auf der Itinerary von Dragoman. Um 09:00 ist unsere kleine Gruppe mit einem Shuttle vom Hotel zur „Plaza de las Tres Culturas“ gefahren und haben uns die Ruinen des „Temple Mayor de Tlatelolco“* angesehen. Der zweisprachige Guide ist leider etwas nervig. Aber es macht eh mehr Sinn, sich die Details (evt.) noch mal bei Wikipedia durchzulesen. Danach sind wir Nordwestlich an diversen Favelas vorbeigefahren. Erst gegen Mittag waren wir an den Pyramiden, als der Touristen Ansturm am Größten war. Wir haben viel Zeit vergeudet schnell zu den Pyramiden zu kommen. Deshalb mein Tipp: Tour ohne Guide organisieren! Wer anschließend noch in den Souvenirladen will, kann das ja kurz vor der Rückfahrt noch machen. Dann ist der nervige Guide nochmal aufgetaucht und hat uns durch die “Basilika Unserer Lieben Frau von Guadelupe” geführt. Für die Mexikaner ist das was wichtiges. Ich fand das nur überflüssig.

    Wikipedia:
    * Temple Mayor de Tlatelolco ....
    * Teotihuacan /teɪˌoʊtiːwəˈkɑːn/ (Spanish: Teotihuacán) (Spanish pronunciation: [teotiwa'kan] is an ancient Mesoamerican city located in a sub-valley of the Valley of Mexico, which is located in the State of Mexico 40 kilometres (25 mi) northeast of modern-day Mexico City. Teotihuacan is known today as the site of many of the most architecturally significant Mesoamerican pyramids built in the pre-Columbian Americas. At its zenith, perhaps in the first half of the first millennium CE, Teotihuacan was the largest city in the pre-Columbian Americas, with a population estimated at 125,000 or more, making it at least the sixth largest city in the world during its epoch. After the collapse of Teotihuacan, central Mexico was dominated by the Toltecs of Tula until about 1150 CE. Not to be confused with Tenochtitlan.
    Teotihuacan is located in Greater Mexico City. The city covered 8 square miles; 80 to 90 percent of the total population of the valley resided in Teotihuacan. Apart from the pyramids, Teotihuacan is also anthropologically significant for its complex, multi-family residential compounds, the Avenue of the Dead, and its vibrant murals that have been well-preserved. Additionally, Teotihuacan exported fine obsidian tools that are found throughout Mesoamerica. The city is thought to have been established around 100 BCE, with major monuments continuously under construction until about 250 CE. The city may have lasted until sometime between the 7th and 8th centuries CE, but its major monuments were sacked and systematically burned around 550 CE. Although it is a subject of debate whether Teotihuacan was the center of a state empire, its influence throughout Mesoamerica is well documented; evidence of Teotihuacano presence can be seen at numerous sites in Veracruz and the Maya region. The later Aztecs saw these magnificent ruins and claimed a common ancestry with the Teotihuacanos, modifying and adopting aspects of their culture. The ethnicity of the inhabitants of Teotihuacan is the subject of debate. Possible candidates are the Nahua, Otomi or Totonac ethnic groups. Scholars have suggested that Teotihuacan was a multi-ethnic state. The site covers a total surface area of 83 square kilometres (32 sq mi) and was designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1987. It is the most visited archaeological site in Mexico, receiving 4,185,017 visitors in 2017. After the collapse of Teotihuacan, central Mexico was dominated by the Toltecs of Tula until about 1150 CE. Teotihuacan exported fine obsidian tools that are found throughout Mesoamerica. The later Aztecs saw these magnificent ruins and claimed a common ancestry with the Teotihuacanos, modifying and adopting aspects of their culture. The ethnicity of the inhabitants of Teotihuacan is the subject of debate. Possible candidates are the Nahua, Otomi or Totonac ethnic groups. Scholars have suggested that Teotihuacan was a multi-ethnic state. The city and the archaeological site was designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1987. It is the most visited archaeological site in Mexico, receiving 4,185,017 visitors in 2017.

    Koordinaten: 19°41′24″ N 98°50′23″ W
    Höhe: 2.280 müN

    Editiert am ....
    Text von Wolfgang
    ÖFFENTLICH
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  • Day13

    Mexico city and Teotihuacan

    January 5 in Mexico ⋅ ⛅ 22 °C

    It took 10 years but I hold my promise. Here I am in Mexico City visiting an old friend. There is nothing that meeting and holding an old friend after that long. Thanks for this warm welcome 🙏

  • Day9

    Temple of the Sun

    June 3, 2018 in Mexico ⋅ ☀️ 22 °C

    When we got to the Temple of the Sun there were massive crowd's, a lot of them stopping at the intermediate platforms to catch their breaths. I went straight up, jumping the queues 😁

    The Temple of the Sun has 365 steps representing the number of the day's, the Temple of the Moon 144 steps. Although shorter, the ground slopes down from the north southwards. So that the top of both Temple's are at the same height. Originally they would have had some sort of building on the top. You get a tremendous view over the whole complex from here.Read more

  • Day9

    To Cuernavaca

    January 26, 2018 in Mexico ⋅ ⛅ 9 °C

    Well, we were wrong. Cuernavaca is not some beautiful little town in a valley of eternal spring. It is a chaotic, congested, haphazard amalgam of people and way too many cars, bikes, and buses of all sizes. Totally not what we were expecting. Bad planning. I would not recommend coming here unless you are interested in just seeing what life here looks like. It gives new meaning to what urban planners mean when they talk about the perils of a lack of planning.

    Cuernavaca does have a few things to visit, but unfortunately our weekend trip planner neglected to research the extent of earthquake damage. Most of the main sights in town are closed to visitors (like the palace where Hernán Cortes lived after he conquered Mexico City and a cathedral that looks interesting from the outside) but one museum was open. It was the house of Robert Brady, a rich American painter who lived in Cuernavaca and jammed a million items into his very nice house. One Frida self-portrait and a few other notable paintings crammed in between figurines, paintings, plates, wall hangings, and random other collectibles of all types.

    At least it looks like the ruins at Xochicalco are open, so we will head there tomorrow. Sunday's plan looks like a mariachi mass (I am serious) and some waterfall that may be dry because there has been no rain. I would not say this has been the best choice of places to go, but the beer is good.
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  • Day1

    Teotihuacán

    September 30, 2016 in Mexico ⋅ ⛅ 18 °C

    Sonnenpyramide, Mondpyramide, Straße der Toten.
    Warum ist das so hoch?! 😅

  • Day1

    Trip to Tehotihuacan

    October 29, 2016 in Mexico ⋅ ⛅ 61 °F

    We woke up early in an attempt to avoid traffic in town. We caught a quick uber to the omnibus station (only $3 for 20 mins, the exchange rate is quite favorable at 19:1) and then hopped on a bus to Tehotihuacan. We chose this method of transport to bypass the tourist crowds and save money for better things (see: dinner footprint). We hit some traffic out of town so the drive took around 75 minutes. Along the way, we saw lots of colorful houses built up into the hills.

    Upon arrival at the archaeological site, we paid our $3 admission and headed towards the pyramids. The first thing we noticed was that a plethora of vendors were selling a toy/souvenir which made a loud, puma-like growl. It was persistent throughout our stay and quite obnoxious, but what can you do... The site was pretty impressive. The pre-Columbian and pre-Aztec city is estimated to have been home to over 100,000 people in the first centuries BC. What remains are a series of structures along a long road (the Avenue of the Dead), with a number of large plazas for gatherings, and two large pyramids: one in honor of the sun and the other in honor of the moon. One can climb up on both pyramids to look over the entire city ruins. At 216 ft, the pyramid of the sun is the third largest ancient pyramid in the world. Many believe that this was the western hemisphere's first great city.

    For lunch, we decided to try a restaurant recommendation Brittany had found in a travel blog. The blog had noted that it was just outside of Puerta 1 but we soon found out it was actually outside of Puerta 5, a half mile walk away. Although a bit touristy for its location in a cave, La Gruta was tastefully decorated with an altar for Día de Muertos. Vegetarian options were scarce but our waiter kindly suggested the pollo fajitas... without the pollo and with oyster mushrooms instead. The atmosphere and cold beers made it a fun experience.
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  • Day40

    Piramides de Teotihuacán

    February 15, 2017 in Mexico ⋅ ☀️ 18 °C

    Die prähistorische Stadt Teotihuacán ist UNESCO Weltkulturerbe und besteht heute im Wesentlichen aus zwei großen Pyramiden: Die Sonnenpyramide (Pirámide del Sol) und die Mondpyramide (Pirámide de la Luna), die durch die "Straße der Toten" verbunden sind.
    Früher (um das Jahr 0) lebten hier Zehntausende Menschen und die Stadt war die größte und bedeutendste Amerikas.Read more

  • Day77

    Ciudad de México - los últimos días

    August 19 in Mexico ⋅ ⛅ 16 °C

    Wir sind zurück in Mexico City und wir haben für die letzten Tage in der Stadt einen Reisegefährten. Cornelius (Tessa's Bruder) wird uns die nächsten 3 Wochen begleiten und wir zeigen ihm viele Dinge die wir in den letzten Wochen hier gesehen oder auch selbst noch nicht gemacht haben.
    Gleich am ersten Abend geht's zum 'lucha libre' dem mexikanischen Wrestling. Super witzig und eine riesen Unterhaltung. Die luchadores lassen die Fetzen fliegen und die Zuschauer feuern begeistert an (nicht ganz jugendfrei 🙉🙊).
    Nach einem gemeinsamen Rundgang im Centro histórico essen wir zu viele Tacos und unser Bargeld reicht nicht mehr für den Eintritt zum Torre Latinoamérica. 🌮🌮🌮💸💸💸😋😳😂
    Auch mit Corni geht's wieder zum Radeln am autofreien Sonntag.
    Und zum Abschluss unserer Zeit in CDMX geht's zu den nahegelegenen Pyramiden von Teotihuacan. Wir laufen sie hoch und wieder runter... Bestaunen sie von unten und von oben...
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  • Day186

    Teotihuacan

    February 4, 2016 in Mexico ⋅ ☀️ 11 °C

    We arrived at Teotihuacan at 9 am on a chilly morning and got some exercise climbing the massive Pyramid of the Sun and huge steps of the Pyramid of the Moon for views that would be far more impressive if they weren't limited by Mexico City's smog. Karl was feeling weak after a rough night so sat out the elective walks around the sprawling ancient city to save energy for the second half of the day, while Holly, Helene and Francois visited the Avenue of the Dead, the Palace of Quetzalpapalotl, and got a great explanation about the cosmic significance of the site by a helpful information ambassador. Needless to say, the vast scale of the site and the pyramids and temples is mind boggling, as is trying to imagine what this sacred city looked like in it's hayday.Read more

You might also know this place by the following names:

Estado de Morelos, Morelos, MOR, Morelose osariik, モレロス州, Morelosas, 莫雷洛斯州

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