Greece
South Aegean

Here you’ll find travel reports about South Aegean. Discover travel destinations in Greece of travelers writing a travel blog on FindPenguins.

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  • Day24

    Mit dem Bus zu...

    October 22 in Greece

    ... Den Häusern mit den blauen Dächern - Oia. Bei bestem Wetter und wenig Menschen, dankbar das die Saison vorüber ist. 😊

    Es durfte zur Mittagspause auch kein Tzaziki fehlen, mjami. Blöd nur das wir auf dem Rückweg nicht mehr in den Bus passten, da er schon voll war. Wir haben uns ein Taxi mit zwei Amerikaner geteilt, typisch griechisch durften wir zu viert hinten sitzen😄 naja, nur roch ich leicht nach knoblauch 🙈 dafür waren wir in 15 Minuten zurück in Thira, anstatt in 30 Minuten, der Taxifahrer musste noch zum airport - gut für uns 😉 somit blieb uns noch Zeit, den Eselweg zu Fuß zu gehen, anstatt die Seilbahn zu nehmen. Die Mulis taten mir etwas Leid und hab sie ein wenig hinterm Ohr gekrault. 😊Read more

  • Day59

    Oia, Santorini

    October 27 in Greece

    Another easy morning with a very delicious breakfast on our terrace. This is such a beautiful place to wake up to and we are loving the ease of staying here. We had a very relaxing morning lazing in the spa and just chilling out.

    We decided to go to “our local”, the Golden Sunset Cafe for lunch and Brad once again ordered his favourite, grilled squid, and I tried the local tomato balls which were delicious. Brad has been enjoying the local beer, Mythos, and the local white wine has been very easy to drink. Initially we did think €5 per glass was expensive but it was a big glass and they fill it to the top. Great value.

    After lunch we decided to catch the bus to Oia to check out the other well known town of Santorini. The bus ride was interesting as we were crammed on and stood in the back stairwell for most of the journey.

    It was very interesting seeing the contrast between the “tourist” towns and the local areas of Santorini. It is very dry here and arid looking and we did wonder how the locals survive as there was very little farming. The other thing we were unaware of was that the majority of the towns close down once the tourist season is over. As it ends at the end of October we only just scraped in being able to visit Santorini. Many restaurants and cafes were running their stock down and the staff were counting down the days. The best part about coming this time of year is that there are a lot less crowds and we got to really enjoy the laid back atmosphere.

    Oia is a very pretty town and different to Thia (Fira) in that there is more colour in the buildings and a slightly different style. I loved wandering through the shops as they offered different things to what Fira offered. We walked into an art gallery and walked out with a lovely canvas picture of one of the many interesting doors in Oia. We love taking home a piece of art to put on the walls as it is a constant reminder of our wonderful adventures.

    We spent a very relaxing afternoon strolling the laneways, patting the cats, and taking some great photos of the vista. Viewing the sunset from Oia is meant to be the best vantage point to see the sun setting on Santorini but we decided we didn’t want to hang around as the town was filling up with more tourists and we were very happy with the view from our terrace.

    We caught the bus home and spent the rest of the day enjoying our down time on our terrace. Another excellent day in Santorini.
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  • Day514

    Santorini photos

    September 11 in Greece

    While in Santorini we didn’t have a lot of time but we saw Thira the main town and walked down to the old harbour passing all the donkeys, I suggested to John we could walk back up but ‘no way’ was the response so we used the cable car, funicular to get back up, without our overnight bag I might have given it a go but would definitely have been dripping at the top.Read more

  • Day13

    Parikia

    November 1 in Greece

    We went to the capital and largest city in Paros, Parikia. City may be a bit of a stretch, though, more like a large town. We walked around the water front, admiring some large sailboats and catamarans and then went up the street to the Church With a Hundred Doors. It is a complex of chapels and a large church. The most impressive part was a chapel built in the 4th century with a Baptistery, a stone immersion tub in the shape of a cross. There was a Byzantine museum as well, with works of art from the 15th century onward. The large church had a women's gallery where you could look down into the main worshipping area. Like other Greek Orthodox churches we have peeked into ( they are usually locked), it had a huge brass chandelier, about 10 feet across, with candles on several levels.
    Just down the street was the Archeological Museum, with statues and artifacts found all over the island.
    We also visited the remains of a Venetian Fort. The Venetians ruled here from the 1300's to the 1500's. All the towns here have narrow alleys to walk through the old town, and Parikia was no different. Some shops were open, but because by this time it was after lunch, most were closed for siesta which generally goes from 1:00 til 5:30. It is also the end of the season, so some are closed until next spring. Parikia is on the opposite side of the island from Drios where we are, so we went there in one direction and returned in the other, completing a circumnavigation of the island.
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  • Day13

    Antipiros

    November 1 in Greece

    Antipiros is an island very close to Piros. We had signed up for a tour from the resort and left this morning with two American ladies and our guide, Stamos. He owns the resort with his wife, Maria, who was the chef at the cooking night. We got considerably better at understanding his English as the day went on. He referred to our group as 'homogeneous' which apparently meant that we got along well together. Another interesting phrase was that he didn't want to get 'corroded', or in our terms, rusty, so he did the tour every week.
    It was a short ferry ride to get to Antipiros and we did some sightseeing and then got on another small boat to go to the island of Despotico. There are no people living on this island, but 1000 goats roam it. There is a big archeological dig there, where they have uncovered a temple dedicated to Apollo dating to about 1500 BC. Stamos was extremely knowledgable about this site as he has made quite a study of local archeology. The temple was destroyed after Christianity came. The Venetians in the 1300's took away a lot of marble to be used in their own Castle and surrounds in the town on Antipiros. They continue to excavate and depend on donations for much of the cost. Tom Hanks and his wife have made huge donations to this and Stamos showed us their house later, on Antipiros. After leaving Despotico our boat captain took us to see the cliffs and the sea caves on the coast of Antipiros.
    We had lunch at a taverna and let Stamos do the ordering so we could try many local dishes... calamari, small fish, soft cheese, deep fried zucchini, mashed fava beans and a warm green salad.
    We did a short walking tour in the town by the ferry to see the Venetian castle and all of the marble pieces scattered around that had come from Despotico. Stamos thinks many of these should be returned for the restoration there.
    Our day ended with a visit to a ceramic shop back on Paros. Beautiful pieces, all hand done by the owner.
    It was a great day!!
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  • Day14

    Winery and marble

    November 2 in Greece

    On our last day on Paros, there were a few things we wanted to see. One was a winery at Naoussa. Some of the others from here had gone the other day and said it was worthwhile. It was!! The winery has been owned by the same family since the early 1900's and they have on display many presses, and equipment used over the years, as well as pictures taken over some time. You can stroll down the room used for barrel storage and look into the bottle storage areas. We were the only people there, so took our time looking around and then tasted six wines. The fellow working was very well versed on the wines and gave us a rundown on each one answering questions as we went. Their grapes are grown in their own vineyards and across the island. One type of grape is grown only up in the mountainous areas and is still brought down by donkeys as there are no roads to use. It was a very interesting visit.
    We went to the waterfront in Naoussa for lunch at an outdoor cafe and took a stroll down the dock area after, spotting an octopus on a rail, drying in the sun. Calamari for supper?
    Another place we had heard about, in the centre of the island, was the ancient marble quarry. The marble from here was highly prized for its colour and purity. The big claim to fame for it was the marble for the Venus de Milo came from here. It was used, of course, for many temples and important buildings over 3000 years ago. There is not much left to identify the old quarries, except pieces of rough marble lying about. It has all grown up with bushes. There did seem to be active quarry a small distance away, but we were not allowed in there.
    One thing I had been trying to get a picture of, was the terracing up in the mountains. Rock walls were built on the side hills to make small patches of farmland. Stamos told us that some of these walls are 1000 years old. These terraces go up from steep, twisting roads where it is difficult to stop and take a picture. This was the best I could do, but doesn't do it justice. I have picked a few stones in my day, and would not want to be building these walls!
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  • Day514

    Santorini Thira

    September 11 in Greece

    Well it was a lot more blowy on Sunday when we woke in Aliki but the trip along the south coast of Paros went well as sheltered, as did the east coast section but then we had to cross to Naxos, not so nice! We got there OK but there were a few bangs as the bow landed, on arrival we radioed as per pilot book instructions no answer Umm so after waiting for a few condor sized ferries to unload and load we headed around and into Marina to get what we thought was a brusque brush off from the harbour master ‘ you haven’t called why not no place no to anchorage place and call after 6pm?’ Oh dear not looking so good, we had looked for email and phone number but nothing on internet or in our books. We sat in the bumpy anchorage spot considering options, ferry and hotel non refundable this close to departure but if the harbour master didn’t find a spot 6pm was late to try to reach somewhere more sheltered. We decided to risk waiting, fortunately when John called at 6 pm there was a spot not a great one but better than the anchorage and he would find a better space in the morning, thank goodness looked like Santorini trip was on.
    After we tied up with 7 ropes we decided to go and have a well earned drink, while doing this another yacht came in and moored up alongside us, we popped back to make sure everything OK, move dingy so they could get round etc. In the morning they bought us pain au chocolate as a thank you, much appreciated by me!
    The harbour master came around 9:15 and we negotiated another mooring and managed to move without to much bother, alongside boat also moved as a super yacht was due to arrive and go where we were. So another mammoth rope tieing session and John was happy, we secured boat and headed to ferry ⛴.
    Santorini is three quarters of a caldera, the rim of an old volcano with steep sides on the west, sloping gently to the sea on the east it is touristy a bit like Mykonos but not as ‘in your face’ and the views are stunning. I will put photos here and on next post with little or no writing as can only have 6 per post.
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  • Day517

    Koufonisia

    September 14 in Greece

    On our from Naxos SE towards the Dodecanese we passed Koufonisia it looked beautiful but a bit small to spend the next week on and the Pilot book said the bay experienced severe gusts during the Meltemi, so onwards we headed. Admittedly the Pilot book also said that it wasn’t possible to take the channel between the islands that we had just taken to reach the Koufonisia harbour but hey you can’t be right all the time and our Greek chart was quite sure there was plenty of water and space. Sadly once we cleared this island the sea got a lot choppier and the wind picked up so I spent the next 8hours lying on the floor😓 feeling very sorry for myself. We arrived at Levitha, our anchorage, at 9pm in the dark and tried to find a mooring bouy, we gave up and anchored leaving again early to come here to Leros. Levitha also looked good but almost deserted we could hear goats and apparently there was 1taverna, that was who had put in the mooring bouys. Perhaps we will be able to go back for a couple of nights but a week would be too long. Again the journey started well but deteriorated to me lying on the floor feeling queasy🤢 and then just before we arrived the jib catch, at the top, it might be called the leach, broke. We managed to furl the sail roughly to get into the large natural harbour at Lakki on Leros and anchored up. This was Saturday the sail guy is going to come and have a look 👀 tomorrow to let us know the cost of repair, we will also get the sacrificial edge, the UV bit, replaced as it is almost completely gone. We have also replaced the Greek courtesy flag with a new one. Photo of map will help with next post from our quad biking day.Read more

  • Day521

    Quad biking around Leros

    September 18 in Greece

    Since we had a day to wait until our foresail was ready we hired a quad bike for a day and took a whistle stop drive around. We went first to the Castle near Plantanos passing a row of windmills that had been converted into holiday lets they looked lovely. The Castle was built by the Knights of St John on the site of older temples and had commanding views of all the island bays. Then down into Agia Marina for a coffee before visiting the British war cemetery. This is, per the museum curator at the Castle, where Ginger Baker’s (from the band Cream) Dad is buried. We then drove North to the airport and beyond to the boatyards at Partheni and to Blefouti where we tried to find the vineyards and failed probably for the best as John was driving and unless the wine is sweet I wouldn’t like it. My palette is not cultured yet. The airport is tiny with one runway that only takes prop planes and ends at the sea. We then headed to Gourna bay for lunch where I tried Mussels Saganaki, that means in a tomato garlic and feta sauce, very Greek and very nice John had Pork steak beautifully cooked and huge. We don’t understand why pork is so cheap when we haven’t seen a single pig. After lunch we decided to tackle one of the many peaks on the island and chose the one in the South West up from Xirocampos, it was a heck of a drive on a gravel road the engine on the bike it was only a 150 struggled on some of the inclines, but the views at the top were awesome, we even found a German looking bunker. The trip down was even slower than on the way up, and we were impressed with the local goats road sense, as we approached they got off the road and when we had passed got back on. We then went back up the island to Panteli for an ice cream 🍦 before popping in for some shopping before returning the bike. After we dropped off the bike we met Sandra and Dennis for a drink, this is a couple who lived in Beaucette for 4 years in early 2000. They have been sailing for 18 years on and off, stopping and working when necessary. We chatted about Guernsey 🇬🇬 and also their travels.Read more

You might also know this place by the following names:

South Aegean, Νότιο Αιγαίο, Égée-Méridionale, Egeo Meridionale, 남부 에게 주

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