Italy
Palermo Ferry Port

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41 travelers at this place

  • Day184

    Finally leaving Palermo....

    July 26, 2020 in Italy ⋅ ☀️ 30 °C

    After many hours delay, and many hours waiting in the harbour of Palermo, we are finely on our way to Citavecchia. 24 hours? We will see.
    Post this with the last drop of internet connection....

  • Day3

    Ein Abstecher nach Vallelunga

    November 4, 2019 in Italy ⋅ ☀️ 21 °C

    Caterina wollte gerne ihre Tante besuchen, gesagt getan. Eine Stunde Serpentinen hin und eine Stunde Serpentinen zurück und mitten drin Vallelunga. Hat sich aber gelohnt die Tante war sehr glücklich.

  • Day4

    Palermo

    November 5, 2019 in Italy ⋅ 🌬 24 °C

    Palermo ist eine unglaublich chaotische Stadt und nichts für schwache Nerven. Hier ist es konstant laut, durch die vielen Autos und noch mehr Motorroller hier wird, aus reinem Selbstschutz, andauernd gehupt. 5 Fahrzeuge auf 2 Spuren nebeneinander, NORMALRead more

  • Day5

    Chaotic Catania

    June 8, 2018 in Italy ⋅ ⛅ 21 °C

    Back on the rails again. Got chatting to a couple from Melbourne who had spent 8 days in Syracuse. ‘Don’t get me wrong’, he said, ‘we loved it, but it does need a bit of TLC and some of these old buildings want demolishing’. Ah, the Aussies…

    Today’s trip involved taking the train to Catania where after a 2 hour break there was a connection to Sicily’s capital, Palermo. The first train was brand new, with comfy leather seats and welcome air-conditioning. The only problem was that it was packed with over-excited teenagers on their way to Rome, and an even more excited teacher who screamed at the top of her voice, constantly waving her arms, pulling passengers from their seats, waving bits of paper and yelling at her charges to sit in their assigned seats. After about 20 minutes her pupils were all finally seated when the train conductor arrived to break the news that they were in the wrong carriage. More yelling and waving of papers, but at last they departed.

    On arrival at Catania with 2 hours to kill, I asked at the Customer Service window if there was any left luggage facility. Without lifting her head from her Bella magazine, the Customer Service representative said ‘no’. Do you have any WiFi in the station? ‘No’. Well, do you know anywhere nearby where I might be able to access WiFi, such as McDonalds or Starbucks? ‘No. We have nothing like that. Nowhere.’ I wondered if she had contemplated a career with the Catania Tourist Information Service.

    I had a hot but interesting walk into the city centre, laden with luggage. The main Duomo Square was beautiful, but the rest of Catania looked like a poor relation of Syracuse, only bigger and more built up - and the litter - cigarette butts everywhere - where were the Glasgow Central Fag Police when you needed them?

    As it was a few hours since breakfast and I would be on the train to Palermo for the next 3 hours, I decided to take a packed lunch on board, given my experience of Trenitalia catering. I found a nice little coffee shop with a smiling senorita who explained she cooked everything herself and it was all health foods. By this time it was too late to make my escape, so I opted for a spinach and ricotta cheese flatbread. She cut me a square with the precision of a surgeon and carefully packed it in a crisp white grease proof envelope. ‘Van ov my desserts, perhaps?’ she suggested with the insistence of Frau Blücher from Young Frankenstein. I pointed to the least offensive - one of her whole meal chocolate and pistachio nut offerings and thought she wouldn’t win any prizes from Mary Berry. A bottle of home made Sicilian lemonade later and I started cramming the goods into my already packed backpack. ‘Oh no’ exclaimed Frau Blücher, ‘you must carry eet like thees’ and held the package up flat on her outstretched palm, a presentation worthy of the adoration of the Magi.
    I returned to catch the train balancing my precious goods and found an unoccupied table seat for four. As I reached for the luggage rack, my precious bakery item slipped from the envelope and landed ricotta side down on the floor. The two girls opposite thought this highly amusing, but I thought what the hell, and picked it up, dusted it down and ate it. Well it was either that or starve.

    I had bought a half kilo of cherries from a fruit stall outside and then proceeded to devour them instead of the nut tart. They were delicious, but the juice from an overripe one squirted over my shirt. By this time the girls were biting their lips and giggling helplessly. I couldn’t quite catch what they were saying, but it was something along the lines of ‘Poor old soul, he really shouldn’t be let out alone’. All I could think of was the lyric from that Francie and Josie song ‘Dae cherry stains come oot?’

    I enjoyed the journey to Palermo - lovely countryside with more oranges and lemons. I hadn’t realised how big Sicily was - the largest island in the Med, with a population similar to Scotland’s. Regrettably there wasn’t time to see much of the capital city, but I would love to come back. I found my way to the docks and boarded the GNV Ferry - Atlas - and was pleased with my cabin accommodation for my overnight sailing to Naples. So long, Sicily, it’s been good. Mostly.
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  • Day5

    Surprising Syracuse

    June 8, 2018 in Italy ⋅ 🌬 22 °C

    On arrival, Syracuse proved to be a bigger city than I had imagined. A bit careworn and unkempt, I was glad I was not staying near the station but across a short stretch of water in the attractive Old Town area of Ortigia, a 15 minute walk away. The Terre & Mare B&B was contained within an old palazzo just off the main drag. I pressed the buzzer and was told to come up to the 7th floor - you’ve got to be kidding, I thought, no lift and this heat and this luggage! However a charming young Sicilian rushed out to meet me - ‘sorry, I mean 2nd floor’. Grazie al cielo! He proceeded to provide me with a map and a suggested walking tour of the main sights of old Syracuse. He showed me my single room, small but perfectly formed, complete with WiFi, air-conditioning, ensuite shower room, designer toiletries, and bidet - all of which I put to good use within 10 minutes.

    The suggested walking tour was a hit, and I loved walking about the Old Town with its beautiful Duomo, Temple of Apollo, Castle and fabulous sea views, in the early evening sunshine. Syracuse was the birthplace of Archimedes, and they don’t let you forget it. The restaurant I ate in that night was called Arches. ‘It’s pronounced Arkes’ pointed out the owner, ‘after Archimedes’. And here was me thinking it was named after the 60s pop group who had a hit with Sugar, Sugar.

    I was struck by how many of the more mature ladies looked so glamorous, even when well passed their sell-by date. One particular lady out walking her small dog, looked like a latter day Marilyn Monroe, had she lived. Aged about 80, her hair was coiffed in a platinum blonde 1960s style, with pale makeup and ruby red lipstick. She even had a similar full-skirted white dress à la Seven Year Itch, the only saving grace being that there were no subway gratings nearby.

    The breakfast was a delight - served on the roof terrace with terrific views, and the staff were so friendly. The teenaged girl who giggled and brought endless coffee told me her dearest wish was to visit Scotland, where all the pretty houses had geraniums in their window boxes. Not the last time I was in Govan, senorita. I giggled back and left her to her delusions.

    I could certainly recommend the Terre e Mare B&B if anyone was visiting the area.
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  • Day16

    Beginn Rückreise

    October 3, 2019 in Italy ⋅ ⛅ 23 °C

    In der letzten Nacht erlebten wir ein tolles Gewitter, es blitzte, donnerte und goß in Strömen. Am Morgen war es dann auch trüb und so fiel uns die Abreise nicht allzu schwer. Los ging es nach Catania zum Flughafen, da die meisten von uns ja zurück fliegen. Wir nutzen die Zeit für ein letztes Eis, einen Kaffee und Forgaccio. Weiter ging es dann nach Palermo, quer über die Insel. Das Wetter war wieder besser und so hatten wir eine tolle Sicht vom Bus aus. Jetzt werden wir uns gleich auf die Fähre ⛴ begeben und 23.00 Uhr geht es wieder los Richtung Genua, wo wir dann hoffentlich planmäßig gegen 19.00 Uhr ankommen werden. Bis dahin erst einmal Tschüß. Die Fotos sind leider aus dem Bus heraus fotografiert, aber ich denke man kann Einiges erkennen. Palermo war mehr als chaotisch und hier holt uns Blitz und Donner wieder ein. Schauen wir mal, ob wir trocken an Bord kommen.Read more

  • Day55

    Arrivederci Sizilien

    December 3, 2019 in Italy ⋅ ☀️ 16 °C

    Schön war's auf Sizilien und es gibt auch Einiges an was man sich recht schnell gewöhnt hat und sich aber jetzt noch schneller abgewöhnen muss. Beim Autofahren heißt es ab jetzt wieder alle Geschwindigkeitsbegrenzungen, Überholverbote, Durchfahrtsverbote und Einbahnstraßen einhalten😂.
    Alles in allem war das Autofahren in Sizilien recht entspannt. Es wird mitunter gegen eine Vielzahl von Regeln verstoßen, aber das auch an Stellen wo sie nicht unbedingt Sinn machen. Alles vor dem Hintergrund dass alle gegenseitig Rücksicht nehmen.
    Wie so oft haben die "Südländer" - so auch der Sizilianer- eine sehr entspannte (wenn auch zwischendurch tempramentvolle und laute 😜) Lebensweise. Ein Land in dem eben nicht alles so gründlich und perfekt ist wie bei uns, aber das Leben auch intensiver wahrgenommen wird.
    Das Einzige was wir als wirklich störend empfunden haben, war an einigen Stellen das offensichtliche Müllproblem😔.
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  • Day24

    Von Livorno nach Palermo

    November 2, 2019 in Italy ⋅ ☀️ 21 °C

    Um Mitternacht sollte unsere Fähre in Livorno ablegen. Leider ging es erst kurz nach 1 Uhr nachts los.
    Da die gebuchten "Liege"-Sitze nicht zum schlafen geeignet waren😬, versuchten wir es mal mit unseren Isomatten am Boden😉.
    Wie auch schon vor 2 Jahren auf unserer Überfahrt nach Sardinien, glich auch diesmal die Fähre einem Geisterschiff 🙄.
    Irgendwann waren dann auch die 18 Stunden vorbei und am Samstag Abend gingen wir dann in Palermo von Bord.
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You might also know this place by the following names:

Porto di Palermo, Palermo Ferry Port