China
Xinjiang

Here you’ll find travel reports about Xinjiang. Discover travel destinations in China of travelers writing a travel blog on FindPenguins.

11 travelers at this place:

  • Day35

    Turpan

    March 22, 2015 in China

    Turpan - death valley of China. At night it is freezing cold but by day the weather rivals that of a hot British August afternoon. I arrived at the train station after another overnight train to a mob of men shouting aggressively 'Tulufana, Tulafana!', which in is the local word for Turpan. The province of xinjiang (where the rest of my time in China will be spent) is home to a minority called Uyghur, part of the Turkic ethnic group. They speak Turkic based language and they write in Arabic script. They are very conservative muslims so the women wear headscarfs and the men muslim hats. They don't look Chinese; more Turkish or middle eastern. It is a strange sight.
    I picked a taxi driver from the crowd and waited 45 minutes for the car to fill with other passengers... This involved doing some mainies of the station road shouting 'Tulufana!' out of the window. The landscape is grey and desolate. It is nearly 9am and the sun is only just rising; the whole of China works officially to Beijing time but over here they have 'local time', two hours behind to account for the discrepancy with the sun's movements. It makes organising events a tad confusing.
    I hired a bike from the hostel (where I was the only guest) and set off to explore the old parts of town. Due to the arrid climate of Turpan, houses are made of mud and ancient ruins can be found all over. The streets are lined with people baking naan bread, frying samsas (meat dumplings) and carving up animal meat which hangs off racks. Mosques are everywhere. The best part of cycling round the town, however, was admiring the ornate gates of peoples' houses, hiding a secret world of courtyards. They were fascinating; bright colours, intricate patterns and floral carvings.
    Late afternoon I went to the Emin Minaret. I was a little peeved at the $9 entry fee but when I went in there was a festival taking place. Turpan is known for growing lots of grapes and during winter they bury them underground. Today was the day they dug them up and it was heralded with traditional music and dance. I was in my element as I absorbed the thunderous drumming and shrill cry of the shawm-like instrument. One of the dancers dragged me up to join in. I guess that's what happens when you're the only white person in town...
    Read more

  • Day91

    Animal market in Kashgar

    August 12, 2018 in China

    Wir kalkulieren immer noch in Peking Zeit, obwohl wir bereits die erste offizielle Zeitverschiebung haben. Die lokale Bevölkerung spricht Chinesisch nur als Zweitsprache, was die Kommunikation selbst für LJ schwierig macht. Die Gesichtszüge der Menschen weisen auch nicht mehr darauf hin, dass wir immer noch in China sind. Um 10:30 (Peking Zeit) fahren wir im truck zum Markt. Dieser „animal market in Kashgar“* soll der größte in ganz Zentralasien sein. Deshalb widme ich dem einen eigenen Footprint. Fazit: der „animal market” war wirklich sensationell und eines der großen Highlights unserer ganzen Reise. Hier hört China auf und der Zentralasien mit seiner vorwiegend islamischen Prägung beginnt.

    Lonelyplanet:
    Sunday Livestock Market: No visit to Kashgar is complete without a trip to the *Livestock Market, which takes place once a week on Sunday. The day begins with Uyghur farmers and herders trekking into the city from nearby villages. By lunchtime, just about every saleable sheep, camel, horse, cow and donkey within 50km has been squeezed through the bazaar gates. It’s dusty, smelly and crowded, and most people find it wonderful, though some visitors may find the treatment of the animals upsetting. Trading at the market is swift and boisterous between the old traders; animals are carefully inspected and haggling is done with finger motions. Keep an ear out for the phrase ‘Bosh-bosh!’ (‘Coming through!’) or you risk being ploughed over by a cartload of fat-tailed sheep. A few simple stalls offer delicious hot samsa (lamb meat buns) if you get peckish.

    Editiert am 04.01.2019
    Text von Wolfgang
    ÖFFENTLICH
    Read more

  • Day92

    Shipton's Arch

    August 13, 2018 in China

    „Shipton's Arch”* ist weltweit der größte Naturbogen. Das komplette „Empire State Building” würde da reinpassen. Die Wanderung auf eine Höhe von etwa 2.900 müN, um dieses Naturschauspiel zu sehen, war ein weiteres Highlight auf unserer Reise. Eine unglaublich tolle Bergwelt gibt es zusätzlich zu bestaunen. Am Horizont in Richtung Kirgisistan schneebedeckte Berge, die vermutlich um die 5.000 m hoch sind sorgen für ein gigantisches Hintergrundpanorama. Keine weiteren ausländischen Touristen und nur wenige chinesische Touristen haben erneut gezeigt, dass wir uns weit von den klassischen Reiserouten des Welttourismus entfernt haben. Für mich war das Panorama eines der schönsten, was ich bisher weltweit gesehen habe.

    Wikipedia:
    *Shipton's Arch (Uyghur: تۆشۈك تاغ‎, ULY: Töshük tagh, UYY: Tɵxük taƣ, USY: Төшүк тағ, literally "Hole Mountain"; simplified Chinese: 阿图什天门; traditional Chinese: 阿圖什天門 is a conglomerate natural arch in China's Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region. It is located in Kizilsu Kirghiz Autonomous Prefecture west-northwest of Kashgar, near the village of Artux, at an altitude of 2,973 metres (9,754 ft). It is probably the world's tallest natural arch. Though long familiar to locals, the south side of the arch is visible from the plain below, it was famously "discovered" in 1947 by English mountaineer Eric Shipton during his tenure as the British consul in Kashgar – and made known to the West in his book Mountains of Tartary. Shipton made unsuccessful attempts to reach the arch from the south but was defeated each time by a maze of steep canyons and cliffs. The arch once figured in the Guinness Book of Records for its exceptional height, but the editors of the book could not verify the location of the arch exactly, so the listing was dropped. It was only as recently as May 2000 that an expedition sponsored by National Geographic rediscovered the arch for foreigners. The arch is about a one- to two-hour drive from Kashgar in addition to another one- to two-hour hike. It used to be that visitors were guided by locals and required to climb shaky ladders on their way to the arch but China has since invested money into a visitor's center, staircases and a viewing deck. The height of the arch is estimated to be 1,500 feet (460 m), about the height of the Empire State Building. The span of the arch is roughly 180 feet (55 m). The "true" height of the arch is debatable: viewing the arch from the north (normal approach route) it appears to be 200 feet (61 m) tall from the top of the 100 feet (30 m) rubble pile; from the south side (approachable via a technical canyon ascent), the height is closer to the estimated 1,500 feet (460 m). The height depends upon what constitutes the base of the arch, which is either the base of the rubble pile (which is partially under the arch and where the span achieves its maximum width) or the floor of the west side canyon head, 900 feet (270 m) lower.

    Editiert am 04.01.2019
    Text von Wolfgang
    ÖFFENTLICH
    Read more

  • Day37

    Kashgar

    March 24, 2015 in China

    After a long overnight train I arrived in the incredible city of Kashgar. Here, the majority of people are Uighur and of Islamic faith. The food and architecture a very middle eastern inflenced. Walking through the old town gives you a fascinating glimpse of a time gone by with people cooking bread, welding door knockers, turning wood and chopping up sheep... As for the latter, I can tell you that they place the sheeps heads on the pavement...
    Along the street you can also sample pomegranate juice and freshly churned vanilla ice cream. They have got the right idea these people.
    Read more

  • Day19

    Day 19: Ni-Hau Urumqi

    August 8, 2016 in China

    After again 33 hours in the train which I am getting used at. It's not the fastest way of traveling but it's an adventure on itself, especially when you have contact with other traveling people. It's more fun and you feel like you are on a party boat or school trip. So leaving the train was harder this time and than you step outside the train station and you just know it: you are in China. Like falling in a hole of antz, and I had to look for one chinese man also. He found me first, how surprising ;-). Great guy, perfect English helped me with dropping my bag and gave me my tickets for the next 2 trips and even changed money. There I was set to check out Urumqi, the weather was bad, but it was nice to feel some rain after these dry days. It was interesting to see the Chinese part of town and the Islamic part go over in each other this city is famous for it. Time flew and I had to get my next train ;-) Bai- Bai Urumqi.Read more

  • Day89

    Fukan to Taklamakan Desert (Korla)

    August 10, 2018 in China

    Today our journey continues westwards through the “Taklamakan Desert”*. Our crossing of the desert usually takes 3 days/2 nights. Please note that occasionally the police insist that we do not camp in times of political tension - in this case we will stay in local hotels in the small towns en route. Estimated Drive Time - 8-10 hours each day.

    09.08.2018
    Wir setzen unsere mittlerweile ständig nörgelnde Caroline am Flughafen in „Ürümqi“ ab. Sie verlässt die Gruppe für einige Zeit, um eigene Aktivitäten zu starten. In Bishek wird Sie wieder bei uns sein. Warum Sie auf „Kashgar“ verzichtet, bleibt ihr Geheimnis. Für die Gruppe bedeutet alleine die Annäherung an den Flughafen eine besonders verschärfte Polizeikontrolle. Bis auf Dana (die jetzt echt Stress mit Caroline hat) nehmen alle Gruppenteilnehmer den Aufenthalt mit stoischer Gelassenheit hin. Alles „part of the travel experience“ ist die generelle Einstellung der Gruppe. Leider fühlen die 3 jungen Leute - die wir bisher in der Gruppe hatten - sich irgendwie nicht verstanden. Alle drei waren bisher unabhängig gereist uns sind in Peking zur Gruppe gestoßen. Vermutlich ein Generations- und ein Teamproblem. Der Rest der Gruppe ist 60+ und harmoniert ganz gut miteinander. Wir haben es heute gut angetroffen. Bisher NUR 2 Polizeikontrollen mit längerem Aufenthalt. Zur Abwechslung kommt um 14:00 die Polizei jetzt selbst in den truck und überprüft jeden einzeln. Wir haben die Fenster weit offen und ein sehr laues Lüftchen von draußen bringt kaum Erfrischung. Die hübsche Polizistin scannt jeden Pass einzeln, macht ein passendes Foto dazu. Wir tippen unsere Telefonnummer in ihr Smartphone. Irgendwie hat sie mir leidgetan. Unter ihrer schusssicheren Weste ist es bestimmt sehr warm. Um 15:00 die nächste Polizeikontrolle. Draußen sind gefühlte 45 Grad. Um 15:30 fahren wir durch wunderschöne Berge und im unteren Bereich waren auch riesige Sanddünen. Einige der schwer beladenen chinesischen Trucks tun sich bei dieser Hitze schwer, überhaupt hier hoch zu kommen. Unsere „Leyla“ fährt sehr geschmeidig die Berge hoch. Ist eben auch ein Mercedes. Die Passstraße geht bis auf eine Höhe von ca. 1.770 müN und erinnert etwas an die „Rainbow Montains“. Bald darauf fahren wir auf konstanten 930 müN. Um 17:30 mal wieder eine komplexere Polizeikontrolle. Würde aber auch langsam mal wieder Zeit. Um 18:00 durchfahren wir eine grüne Oase - dann wieder Wüste und mächtige Berge zur Rechten. Dann wieder riesige kultivierte Flächen, die offensichtlich bewässert werden müssen. Die Bauerndörfer, die wir um 19:00 durchfahren wirken nicht mehr wie das China der Moderne. Sie sind einfach und flach gehalten. Ursprünglich war ein bush camp in der Wüste geplant. Aber die Polizei lässt das leider nicht zu. Um 19:30 taucht mitten in der Wüste die Großstadt „Korla“ mit den obligatorischen Hochhäusern aus dem Nichts auf. In dieser gesichtslosen Stadt überachten wir.

    Wikipedia:
    Die *Taklamakan-Wüste (auch Takla Makan, chinesisch 塔克拉瑪干沙漠 / 塔克拉玛干沙漠, Pinyin Tǎkèlāmǎgān Shāmò oder Taklimakan Shamo, Uighur: Täklimakan Toghraqliri) ist nach der Rub al-Chali die zweitgrößte Sandwüste der Erde. Sie erstreckt sich in Zentralasien im nordwestchinesischen Uigurischen Autonomen Gebiet Xinjiang durch den westlichen Teil des Tarimbeckens bis zu der Straße 218. Östlich dieser Straße liegt die Wüste Lop Nor an der tiefsten Stelle des Tarim-Beckens. Früher wurden die Taklamakan-Wüste und die Wüste Lop Nor durch die Unterläufe der Flüsse Tarim, Konche Darya (Konqi He) und Chärchan Darya (Qarqan He) getrennt, die aber südlich von Tikanlik schon seit Jahrzehnten ausgetrocknet sind.

    Editiert am 04.01.2019
    Text von Wolfgang
    ÖFFENTLICH
    Read more

  • Day91

    Kashgar

    August 12, 2018 in China

    Today we complete our journey to the far west of China, arriving in “Kashgar”, once one of the ancient trading posts on the Silk Route! Estimated Drive Time - 7-9 hours. We will spend 4 nights in Kashgar, during which time there will be lots of opportunity to explore the city and its central “Id Kah Mosque”. We will also have an included visit to the animal market just outside of town, and then the famous “Kashgar Sunday Bazaar”. In Kashgar we will stay in a hotel with good facilities. Included Activities: Explore Kashgar's Sunday market and Animal market (Included in Kitty). Optional Activities: Visit the Id Kah Mosque, the finest example of Islamic architecture in Kashgar and the centre of religious life in the city (CNY 20). Discover the history of the ancient Silk Road at Kashgar's Silk Road Museum (CNY 15). Visit the mausoleum of the 17th-century religious leader Afaq Khoja, considered the holiest site in Xinjiang Province (CNY 15).

    12.08.2018
    Heute morgen haben wir den „animal market” von Kashgar besucht. Das war ein echtes Highlight unserer Reise (siehe separaten Footprint). Danach sind wir zum “Sunday Bazaar” gefahren und sind durch das Gewimmel etwas geschlendert. In Kashgar sind die Uiguren noch unter sich. Sie stellen ca. 70 Prozent der Bevölkerung und prägen weitestgehend das Stadtbild. In Kashgar hat man nicht mehr das Gefühl noch in China zu sein. Generell sind die Uiguren sehr freundlich zu uns. Das hat man deutlich auf dem “animal markt” gemerkt. Die wenigen Han-Chinesen, die sich als Touristen dort haben sehen lassen wirkten dort eher wie Fremde im „eigenen Land“. Heute habe ich endlich einen Gürtelverkäufer gefunden, der mir 2 weitere Löcher in meinen Gürtel gemacht hat!!!! Ein Loch ist jetzt Reserve. Wenn ich weiter so wenig esse, wird das irgendwann noch sinnvoll werden. Am späten Nachmittag sind wir zur “old town” gewandert. Der restaurierte Teil wirkt wie Disney Land und ist uninteressant. Rund um den “night market” gibt es noch einen alten Teil, der durchaus interessant ist. Aber viel gibt es davon leider nicht mehr. Die Überwachung mit massiver Polizeipräsens und unzähligen Überwachungskameras ist leider auch in dieser eher untypisch chinesischen Stadt allgegenwärtig. Uns westliche Touristen lässt man aber gewähren. Es sei denn, man versucht (so wie ich) einen der unzähligen Polizeicheckpoints zu fotografieren. Ich hab das versucht und hatte ruckizucki einen Polizisten neben mir stehen, der mich freundlich aufgefordert hat das Foto zu löschen. Mehr ist zum Glück nicht passiert.

    Editiert am 04.01.2019
    Text von Wolfgang
    ÖFFENTLICH
    Read more

  • Day107

    Flammende Berge

    August 21, 2018 in China

    Heute ging es nach Turpan, auf der Fahrt ging es am heißesten Ort Chinas vorbei.

    Wir sind bei 800 höhe gestartet, dann auf 1500m gefahren und nun bei -40m . Die Landschaft war wieder atemberaubend. Wüste, dann Berglandschaften aus Stein und Sand in allen Brauntönen. Zwischen durch grüne Flusstäler.

    Dann sehen wir ein alten moslemischen Friedhof. So einen haben wir noch nicht gesehen. Wenig später kommen wir zum heißesten Punkt Chinas. Die Flammende Berge.

    Wir haben 44 Grad.
    Read more

  • Day107

    Turpan

    August 21, 2018 in China

    Weiter geht es, neben der Autobahn wird nach Öl gebohrt. Dann sehen wir Lehmhütten, in denen werden die Trauben getrocknet, die Rosinen sollen sehr lecker sein.

    Nachmittags sind wir in Turpan angekommen, eine Oasenstadt.

    Wir parken hinter einem Hotel und haben für 2 Nächte Zimmer, weil es hier auch Nachts nicht abkühlt.
    Die Hitze macht uns doch zu schaffen.

    Wie schon in Hami sieht man überall Polizei und bewachte Geschäfte, man hat den Eindruck die Hälfte der Einwohner arbeitet als Wachpersonal oder bei der Polizei.

    In der Stadt sieht man überall Auto die beklebt sind, hier wird aufgrund des extremen Klimas wahrscheinlich viel getestet.
    Read more

  • Day115

    Zollhof

    August 29, 2018 in China

    Ausreise aus China stand heute auf dem Programm.

    Um 10 Uhr war Treffpunkt am Zollhof. Also um 6:30 Uhr aufgestanden und los gemacht.

    Am Zollhof mussten erst die Papiere erledigt werden, dann ging es zum Röntgen. In einer großen Halle war ein Röntgengerät für Lastwagen.

    Einer nach dem anderen wurde geröntgt. Nach 2 Std waren alle durch.

    Dann ging es zur ersten Passkontrolle, das lief Recht zügig bis um 13:00 Uhr die Computer nicht mehr liefen, weil Mittagspause. Um 15:30 sollte es weiter gehen. Also warten.

    Die Grenzsoldaten waren Recht pünktlich und es ging weiter. Nach der Grenze fuhren wir weiter bis zum ersten Checkpoint. Wieder Fahrzeug Kontrolle und Pässe kontrollieren. Die Beamten bekommen immer eine Namensliste die abarbeiten.

    Dann geht es 60 km zum nächsten Checkpoint.
    Read more

You might also know this place by the following names:

Xinjiang Uygur Zizhiqu, Xinjiang, Région autonome de Xinjiang, Xinjiang Uyghur Zizhiqu, 新疆

Join us:

FindPenguins for iOS FindPenguins for Android

Sign up now