Chile
Aysén

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172 travelers at this place
  • Day326

    Lago General Carrera

    October 4, 2019 in Chile ⋅ ⛅ 4 °C

    Der Lago General Carrera ist der grösste See in Chile und der zweitgrösste See in Südamerika. Hier haben wir eine Kayaktour zu den Marmorhöhlen unternommen. Diese weltweit einzigartigen Höhlen zeigen wieder einmal mehr, was die Natur über Jahrtausende erschaffen kann.Read more

    Monika Leuthard

    Ganz idröcklechi Brocke. Schön

    10/8/19Reply
     
  • Day20

    Puerto Chacabuco, Chile

    February 12, 2020 in Chile ⋅ 🌧 52 °F

    Puerto Chacabuco is a small town tucked deep in the fjords of Chile with majestic mountain formations, rivers and waterfalls everywhere you look. Much of the scenery here is untouched by humans, making it a beautifully pristine environment. Sounds pretty perfect, huh? Well, I left out the part that it rains 10’ a year. That plus the grocery store I saw makes it a not so good choice for me.
    Since we visited here 2 years ago, we felt we had pretty much walked every street in the town and thought it might be a good idea to join one of the excursions that was offered. This would give us a better idea of what lay beyond the port.
    It’s very easy to read and sign up for excursions in the comfort of our home in Virginia, months before the trip. That must have been when I thought that a kayaking trip sounded like “fun”
    (sometimes we refer to that as the “f” word).
    Indeed, it was a great time. When we left this morning it was 45 degrees and pouring rain.
    I considered the wisdom of continuing on this adventure merely from a comfort standpoint. We’re tougher than that! We headed out on about a 1 hour bus ride to a gorgeous, peaceful lake.
    After suiting up with the appropriate gear, about 10 of us, plus 3 guides took off in our kayaks (Jeff and I were in a 2-person kayak). The spectacular, jagged mountains surrounded us, birds unlike any we had ever seen or heard flew and swam around us and the water was so still and clear it seemed unreal. We learned much about the area while we gently paddled and there was “just a little bit of rains” about every 10 minutes.
    This was all good for about an hour until the guide told us that the lake turns into a river and there were 3 sets of rapids ahead.
    I scanned my memory to remember if I read anything in the trip description about paddling through rapids and thought if I had seen that I wouldn’t have signed us up! Well, at this point the guide asked if anyone was uncomfortable and before I could yell “YES”, everyone in our group said they were fine with it. Talk about peer pressure. So I asked Jeff if he was fine and he assured me it would be alright. The main guide said to just follow him and paddle hard. We hit a branch on the first rapid and ran aground in the third one, but regained our momentum.
    It really was fine, but my adrenaline was going and my knees were wobbly.
    Afterward, there was a break before heading back that featured one of our favorite Chilean specialities-sopaipillas with pebre. Pebre is a traditional Chilean condiment much like a salsa or pisco de Gallo, but the ingredients are chopped up into very tiny bits. A sopaipilla is a piece of fried dough ( yeah, I know, real healthy), that puffs up to form a pocket. You then load the pebre into the pocket and eat it while it drips down your arm. It is so good, I can barely describe it. Yum.
    Soon after, we were dancing with our river guides to a couple of traditional Chilean songs-the dance was very similar to a polka.
    We’re exhausted.
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    Rapids always scare me!!

    2/14/20Reply
    Mark Zimmerman

    O M G...that moment when Rapids are ahead.

    2/18/20Reply
     
  • Day15

    Hitting the road - Carretera Austral

    November 21, 2019 in Chile ⋅ ☀️ 13 °C

    The style of Coyhaique is a mixture of Chilean and Scandinavian which made it very interesting to walk through. We found a nice place for lunch while discussing how we wanted to travel along the Carretera Austral. Renting a car has its advantages, but ultimately we decided for the bus. Knowing that busses might just go twice a week in some areas, our aim was to find out more about bus schedules to see how we can get to O'Higgins on time while seeing some nice stuff on the way. The Internet didn't help us a lot with it, but it turns out the tourist information does not really know much for sure either, so we had to call bus companies directly.

    But we managed to book something and Wednesday morning we took the bus to Villa Cerro Castillo. Several blogs said that fresh vegetables and fruits are scarse along the Carretera Austral, so we bought as much of those as we could fit. Arriving in the small town we set up camp for the first time on this trip. Without sun it got quite cold in the evening and we were excited to try out our new sleeping mats and bags.

    After 8 hours of good sleep we woke up warm to a wonderful blue sky and started our first real hike of the trip 😊 A bit of a lengthy discussion, joined by what felt like all the personnel of the national park, on if or if not it was a smart idea to try to reach the Mirador Cerro Castillo about 1100m higher up while walking through knee-high snow, made us decide to go for a lower viewpoint of Cerro Peñón. Almost 14 km return brought us to this nice spot with a view of the valley and the surrounding mountains covered in snow. Along the way we also saw a pretty nice waterfall.
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    Suzanne Schönbeck

    Camping and hiking finally yayy!!

    11/22/19Reply
    Lida Schönbeck

    Beautiful view. A travellers beard too. Try to look like Daniel?

    11/23/19Reply
    Susanne and Machiel

    Yeah, I'm trying to look like Daniel

    11/24/19Reply
    Lida Schönbeck

    It looks good on you ☺

    11/24/19Reply
     
  • Day33

    Patagoooooooonia

    December 20, 2019 in Chile ⋅ ☁️ 14 °C

    Wir sind jetzt schon einige Tage mit dem Auto unterwegs immer Richtung Süden. Die Landschaft raubt einem immer wieder den Atem und Schotterpisten zu entlegenen Dörfern wechseln sich ab mit endlosen kurvigen Asphaltstraßen durch die Berge. In Raúl Marín Balmaceda sind wir mit dem Boot raus aufs Meer in ein Schutzgebiet um mit Seelöwen, Pinguinen und Delphinen auf Du & Du zu sein - beeindruckend. Heute gings dann auf einen Hike in den Parque Nacional Queulat, um den hängenden Gletscher aus der Nähe zu bestaunen. Alles sehr abgelegen, ruhig und entspannt und die Touristenströme sind noch total gering, das geht so richtig erst in den Ferien im Januar/Februar los. Übermorgen gehts weiter Richtung Coyhaique, wo wir dann auf dem Land Weihnachten verbringen werden, obwohl das gerade noch etwas surreal wirkt, denn Weihnachtsfeeling ist hier so null. Darauf ein Ho Ho Ho! 🌲🤶Read more

    Feliz Navidad von der ganzen Mischpoke <3. Liebe Grüsse von Nico, Tom, Brigitte und Horst.

    12/23/19Reply

    jaman! klotzfisch

    12/23/19Reply

    WOW! Wahnsinnig schön!

    12/23/19Reply
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  • Day13

    Patagonia!

    November 19, 2019 in Chile ⋅ 🌧 11 °C

    We have arrived in a very cold and rainy Coyhaique. Quite the contrast with the Atacama desert! The flights thankfully went ok.

    Now we're finding out what we want to do here and how we want to reach Argentina by the end of next week to meet Franzi in El Chaltén.Read more

    Suzanne Schönbeck

    Happy that you guys made it ok!

    11/19/19Reply
    Nina-Wilhelm Krüger

    How are you doing Machiel? Everything ok? How are the riots? They are also in that city?

    11/19/19Reply
    Susanne and Machiel

    I'm alright! Almost completely fit. Riots are not an issue, we thankfully haven't been anywhere near them. We've only seen small protests in the places we've visited. We do notice that in particular areas shops (walls, glass) are damaged, but we're not entirely sure what the cause of that is.

    11/19/19Reply
     
  • Day85

    Capillas de Marmol

    January 29, 2020 in Chile ⋅ ⛅ 11 °C

    In Puerto Rio Tranquilo erwartete uns ein nasses und kaltes Ziel: die Marmorhöhlen auf dem riesigen Lago Gral Carrera. Der See selbst schimmert in den schönsten türkis- und hellblautönen und sieht fast aus wie gemalt. Von Weitem. Wenn man drauf schippert spürt man vor allem den kräftigen Wind und die eisigen Temperaturen. Die Marmorhöhlen selbst waren zwar nicht so gross wie wir sie erwartet haben, aber trotzdem mal irgendwie was anderes: Die weissen, ganz speziell geformten Felsen in Kombination mit dem hellblauen Wasser waren dann doch wunderschön anzuschauen.😍 Nichtsdestotrotz waren wir nicht böse als der 2.5-stündige Ausflug fertig war; zwei Eiszäpfen machten sich wiedet zurück auf den Weg zum Camping und endlich wieder einer warmen Dusche.Read more

    Susanna Burri-Burger

    Hammmmer😍😍😍

    1/31/20Reply
     
  • Day82

    Entlang der Carretera Austral

    January 26, 2020 in Chile ⋅ ⛅ 14 °C

    Patagonien wir kommen!😍 Nach dem lohnenswerten Abstecher auf die Chiloé-Insel geht es nun auf einer der bekanntesten Strassen Südamerikas Richtung Süden. Bald merken wir auch, wieso die Carretera Austral so beliebt ist: Die Landschaft am Strassenrand ist enorm abwechslungsreich und hat von Fjorden mit steilen Küsten, dichten Wäldern, versteckten Seen, geschwungenen Flussläufen, weiten Ebenen über schroffe Berglandschaften alles zu bieten! So geniessen wir die vielen Fahrkilometer trotz dem mässigen Ausbaustandard der holprigen Schotterpisten und zahlreichen Schlaglöchern sowie einer 20-stündigen Wartepause auf die nächste Autofähre, die mit einer etwas besseren Vorbereitung unsererseits vorgesehen hätte werden können...😉
    Abseits der Strasse fanden wir wunderschöne Wildcamp-Schlafplätze, auf denen wir mal wunderbar ruhige, mal stürmische oder ungeziefer-/bremsengeplagte Nächte verbringen durften.
    Höhepunkt war der Abstecher abseits von der Carretera Austral nach Futaluefú - bekannt für seinen wunderschönen reissenden Fluss. Dort unternahmen wir einen actionreichen River-Rafting-Ausflug mit coolen Stromschnellen und einer (fast noch spannenderen) Rettungsaktion, da ein Boot aus unserer Gruppe kenterte...😄
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    Susanna Burri-Burger

    Chantal bisch DU gsprunge😱?

    1/31/20Reply
    Chantal Burri

    Natürlich 😎

    1/31/20Reply
    Susanna Burri-Burger

    Ohaaaa 😱

    1/31/20Reply
    6 more comments
     
  • Day16

    Marble caves in Río Tranquilo

    November 22, 2019 in Chile ⋅ ☀️ 10 °C

    We actually really liked our campsite. The grass field was really big, we shared it first with some horses and later with some chickens 😊 and the views were pretty amazing.

    Nonetheless, it was time for us to move further. So we had to pack our tents again to take the bus to Río Tranquilo. The bus ride took around 3 hours and went mostly over gravel road. That made it very dusty (yes, even in the bus) , but at the same time the landscape around us became really rough and it felt a bit as if we were on the way to the end of the world.

    The town of Río Tranquilo seems more touristic than Cerro Castillo (probably because of its main attraction - the marble caves) but the general setup seems very similar. Lots of tiny (sometimes improvised) houses, often combined with offering a home stay, camping or small minimarket. Different than what we read previously, those minimarkets actually have decent quality vegetables and fruits. While the choice is very limited the quality was surprisingly better than what we found in a supermarket in Coyhaique. After searching for a camping that was already open this early in the season, we arrived at a relatively busy (compared to the last one) but nice place.

    The sun was really strong and we were actually sweating without hiking for the first time since leaving the desert. Luckily this meant we had a really nice experience on our boat trip to the marble caves. The water was very turquoise, absolutely still and especially when reflecting the sunlight to the marble, it looked very cool.
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    Suzanne Schönbeck

    Woow!

    11/25/19Reply
    Lida Schönbeck

    It seems painted

    11/26/19Reply
     
  • Day18

    Blue, so blue

    November 24, 2019 in Chile ⋅ ☁️ 19 °C

    Having had enough of our milk-oat flakes-fruit-breakfast (not Susanne), and being lazy and being made enthusiastic by a review about the nice breakfast by the owner of our hostel, we arranged for breakfast to be made for us this morning. The homemade jams and cake (or how they are called here: kuchen) were nice but also not super special. We were the only guests at the hostel and the cat was making sure our ears were clean.

    At 10 we picked up our bikes and went on a short 4km trip to Reserve Nacional Tamango. Here we started our hike of the day to Los Carpinteros, a viewpoint over the river and lake Cochrane. It started off being a perfect mirror and along the trail turned into absolutely incredibly blue and clear water. The trail was relatively easy, through nice vegetation, only being disturbed by a few horseflies that liked to chase us. The weather was great and we enjoyed our brought lunch at the very nice viewpoint before heading back. As always we took our time. The 4 hours hike took us almost 6, we simply had to admire the views and the water. Luckily people are relaxed here and returning the bikes we rented for 6 hours after 7,5 was not a problem at all.

    Having had enough of our meat-rich dinners, we bought as many vegetables we think we could eat and ate them all. We had to hit the beds on time as our bus to Villa O'Higgins was leaving at 8am on the following day.
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    Suzanne Schönbeck

    Awww

    11/26/19Reply
    Lida Schönbeck

    I didn't know you love cats so mutch or that cats love you.

    11/26/19Reply
     
  • Day30

    Über die "grüne Grenze" nach Chile

    February 3, 2020 in Chile ⋅ 🌧 7 °C

    El Chaltén liegt für Autos gewissermaßen in einer Sackgasse. Es gibt jedoch eine Möglichkeit die Grenze zu Chile im Norden zu Fuß und mit einer Fähre zu passieren und nach Villa O'Higgins, ein kleines Dorf am Ende der berühmten Carretera Austral, zu gelangen. Dafür habe ich nun vier im guten wie im schlechten Sinne ereignisreiche Tage gebraucht und kann sie dank der spärlichen Internetverbindung in der Bibliothek in Villa O'Higgins teilen.

    Direkter Fehlstart: Ich hatte den Schlüssel für mein Schloss im Hostel-Schließfach liegen lassen - der Klassiker. Beeindruckend wie leicht es sich knacken ließ, aber auch dumm gelaufen, da ich jetzt ein Neues brauche.

    Nun standen drei Tage mit weit über 20 kg Gepäck (dieses Mal konnte ich ja nichts zurück lassen) und je über 20 km Wegstrecke an. Der erste Tag war staubig und der Wind peitschte einem gern mal kleine Steine ins Gesicht. Nachdem mich eine mögliche Unterkunft abwies, da sie für die Nacht wohl ausgebucht war, schlug ich mein Zelt ziemlich erschöpft irgendwo am Weg auf. Allerdings konnte ich hier auch Calafate-Beeren sammeln, um meinen Frühstücks-Haferbrei zu verfeinern. Der zweite Tag führte dann entlang des malerischen Lago del Desierto mit Blick auf den Fitz Roy und endete am argentinischen Grenzposten am Nordufer des Sees, wo man ebenfalls jedeglich den von Gletschern gespeisten See zum Waschen hat. Der dritte Tag war von stundenlangem Regen bestimmt, der auch den Weg in mein Handy fand (die Außentaschen meiner Regenjacke sind wider Erwarten nicht komplett wasserdicht). Noch trocknet es, aber die Chancen stehen schlecht, dass es das überlebt hat.

    Auf dem Weg begegnete mir bereits ein Leipziger, der nach zwei Tagen ungewissen Wartens auf dem Rückweg war. Und tatsächlich, auf dem Campingplatz in der Nähe der Fähranlegestelle und des chilenischen Grenzpostens warteten ca. 50 Leute, teilweise schon seit fünf Tagen auf eine Fähre, die aufgrund der Wellen nicht ablegen konnte. Am nächsten Tag erschien jedoch völlig überraschend ein Grenzbeamter auf dem Fußballplatz, wo wir uns gerade die Zeit vertrieben, um uns mitzuteilen, dass heute Abend noch zwei Fähren ankommen. Am Morgen hatten sich frustiert weitere Leute auf dem Rückweg gemacht, sodass keiner genau wusste, wie viele denn nun nach Villa O'Higgins wollten. Die erste Fähre mit 16 Plätzen war schnell belegt und die zweite bot Platz für 22 Passagiere. Nach dem Durchzählen die Erleichterung: Wir waren noch genau 21 Leute. Nach 2,5 h Fahrt und kurzem Busshuttle kamen wir schließlich irgendwann gegen 01:30 Uhr nachts an und wurden schon in einem Hostel erwartet, das über unsere Ankunft Bescheid wusste.
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    Gordwak Gordwakson

    Ich hätte erwartet, dass du es nach deinen Silvester Erfahrungen besser wüsstest 😂 und dir ein wasserfestes Handy besorgt hast 🤣

    2/4/20Reply
     

You might also know this place by the following names:

Aysén, Aysen