Denmark
Vordingborg Kommune

Here you’ll find travel reports about Vordingborg Kommune. Discover travel destinations in Denmark of travelers writing a travel blog on FindPenguins.

18 travelers at this place:

  • Day808

    Who knew there were so many islands to explore in such a small area of Denmark? We are finally settled near Mosehældgård woodland shelter on Møn, our fourth island of the day, and we have company. A young grey and white cat is climbing over the bonnet and wing mirrors mewing loudly. She came bounding up when we arrived at this gravel and grass parking area and immediately made friends with Will, bounding through the long grass alongside him as he went to check out the camping area with its wooden sleeping hut, compost toilet, picnic tables and stone campfire circles. Vicky fed her some of Poppy's food and treats, much to our beloved dog's displeasure.

    We started off the day on tiny Farø island and were pleased to note that after yesterday's ghastly grey weather, the skies had begun to look brighter. A well built up causeway took us over to Bogø island and soon after, another bridged the sea to Møn; a larger island with acres of green, gently rolling fields.

    Møn had come highly recommended, both by the guidebook and by locals we'd talked to on a neighbouring island. From its long list of attractions we'd picked out a couple to visit, the first of which was Klekkende Høj, a 5000 year old burial mound. Driving down a single track country lane we parked on a small gravel area before following a 300m long path worn into the mud through the middle of a brassica field. Ahead of us rose a grassy dimple, reaching about 6m above field level. Two bare earth tunnels approximately 1m high, with stone slabs lining the walls and roof provided entry to the centre of the mound and a small information board stood discretely to the side, as seems to be the way with many Danish sites of interest. The south tunnel was blocked at the far end so we both got on our hands and knees and entered the north tunnel, Vicky leading the way. All of a sudden Will felt something prodding him from behind, he twisted his head round and thought for a second that Poppy had followed us, but no, he found himself face to face with a German Shepherd! Luckily it was friendly and soon went on its way! After about 10m we emerged into a small chamber about 1.5m high where, between two large slabs through a glass pane, we could see another chamber. Piles of bones, that looked like a mix of human and other animals lay amongst earthenware pottery containers and a complete human skeleton sat up against the far corner, wearing a hat and furs. We generally have little interest in museums, but viewing historical ways of life in situe holds value for us and we really enjoyed the hands on experience of crawling through the dark tunnel to take a peak at the past.

    Continuing to Møn's north coast, we passed through Ulvshale village; pretty strips of pale yellow sand backed by maram grass and a string of 'cute as can be' beach houses, many of them made of wooden board painted in an attractive mix of colours. Each compound had hedges or rustic looking fences marking out their own little gardens.

    From Møn we hopped over to Nyord Island via a single lane causeway controlled by traffic lights. The marshlands we could see as we crossed are classified as a Ramsar Site and protected because of their importance to geese, ducks and other wading birds. At 5 sq km Njord is more than five times larger than Farø, where we had set off from that morning, but like Farø, it could hardly be classed as a big island. Much of it is salt meadow and we passed hardy looking black or brown cattle grazing happily on this. In winter the meadows are flooded, reducing the island to a fifth of its summer area. One of the reasons we wanted to visit was because Njord is certified as one of twenty official International Dark Sky Communities and one of the best places in Denmark for stargazing. Unfortunately the cloud cover wasn't set to lift anytime soon so we didn't stop overnight.

    Back over the causeway to Møn we drove a short distance to Mosehældgård free camping area and pulled into the woodland clearing. Although we'd stayed at several of these shelters over the summer the hot weather had meant most had signs prohibiting campfires. Well, with the amount of rain that had fallen since, there was no problem here and Will built and lit a fire for us to sit round while he played guitar. A kitten had joined the young cat and we sat with the warmth of the flames watching its boundless energy. It jumped here there and everywhere, swatting the insects it disturbed from the long grass and crunching them up if it caught them. Although the forecast had been cloudy, as evening drew on the sky cleared a little and the brightest of the stars shone through.

    The night chilled to 10°C so the heating was called for when we got up the following morning. Dew lay heavy on the grass as Vicky went for an early walk along part of the Camono; a trail that extends 175 km over Denmark's southern islands. Our last act before we left was to take a peak at the hornet's nest in the 7ft 'bug house'. At around 2.5cm long the flying insects were so much larger than we are used to and we didn't hang around too long! Hornets are becoming an increasingly common sight here in Denmark as the climate warms.
    Read more

  • Day809

    Møns Klint and Hvide Klint beach

    September 13 in Denmark

    At the end of a single track road we've squeezed Martha into the corner of a car park that's only just wide enough to do a three point turn. With fields to either side and only the reeds separating us from a beautiful crescent beach ahead, we are pretty chuffed with this overnight spot at Hvide Klint.

    This morning we woke to brilliant blue skies and after Vicky gave Will's hair a trim we set off back towards Ulvshale, the pretty beach village we'd passed through yesterday. Will enjoyed a refreshing dip in the clear waters and we were away, on to our next destination, Møns Klint; the highest cliffs in Denmark. To access the site we drove along a dirt track in Beech forest. We didn't meet a single vehicle on this road but there were 50 or so stationed in the car park beyond the raising barrier at the end. Thank goodness we came off-season because it meant we were easily able to find a spot. The parking ticket covered the whole day, allowing us to grab some lunch in the van without worrying about 'getting our money's worth' from the £4 fee.

    Making sure Poppy was comfortable we hopped out and skirted the perimeter of the Geocentre building. It provided info and exhibits about the cliffs, but we were more interested in seeing the real things so we checked the map on a display board and decided on a round trip along the cliff top, down to and along the beach and back up to the van. People hummed around the centre but we left them behind as soon as we entered the Beech woodland walk. These mature trees covered the cliff top and their trunks and branches framed small glimpses of the famous chalk cliffs with vibrantly turquoise waters lapping at their feet. Most of the path was fenced off from the edge and at certain angles it was abundantly clear why. Tree roots were the only thing supporting the ground as it had been seriously undercut, leaving a deceptive overhang that couldn't be detected from above. After just over 1km we came to the steep wooden steps leading down to the shore, approximately 120m below. Will's knees and the tendons in his feet are prone to problems, as are Vicky's hips, so we took it easy. Even so, Vicky found her legs were shaking when we finally stepped out onto the grey stones covering the beach.

    Møns Klint are Denmark's equivalent of the white cliffs of Dover. While England's cliffs stretch further, they rise to a height of 110m whereas Møns reach just a little higher at 128m; no wonder Vicky's legs were protesting! From the narrow shore, the towering chalk formations really were stunning, especially when the sun highlighted their bright white faces. As we walked northwards we noticed dark flint stones tracing diagonal lines in the face. The chalk consists of crushed shells from microscopic creatures that lived on the sea bed over 70 million years ago. The shells were compacted and pushed upwards by glaciers to form hills and emerged as cliffs when the ice melted 11,000 years ago. The sea and other elements are taking their toll on the soft limestone and the remnants of landslides lay for us to walk over. It certainly wasn't the sort of place you'd feel safe returning to on a stormy day!

    Approaching the steps that led back up to the car park there were a few groups, families and couples milling around taking in the views. It was then we saw a little seal just 5m out in the shallows, sunning itself on a submerged rock. What a way to end our time on the beach! Surprisingly the climb back up the cliffside wasn't as difficult as we'd imagined, but we still treated ourselves to some ice cream when we got back to the van!

    We'd paid our parking fee using a credit card at the ticket machine and the scanning software recognised this as it registered our number plate, opening the barrier for us to pass through without the need for us to stop and feed the ticket in. We couldn't help but think that if the car park on a little island could master this technology, surely the Scandlines ferry company could dispense with the need for us to show our booking number, as we'd had to when crossed!

    It wasn't too long a drive to our overnight beach parking and despite having had dip earlier in the day, Will took to the sea once again, making the most of the late summer.

    We had a treat in store when the sun set. The blue sky day carried over into a clear night sky and the stars were magnificent. We hadn't previously realised that Møn was an International Dark Sky Community along with Njord Island but could well believe it. At just after 2am we woke and went outside to gaze into the atmosphere. From our position on the beach the landscape around us was flat with very few trees. The stars reached so low to the horizon and the Milky Way stretched accross the twinkling blackness. Will went back in after a while but Vicky stayed out for nearly 2 hours playing with the cameras and lying back on the sand staring up at space and time, quietly blowing her mind with the enormity and beauty of our universe. She eventually got brought back to earth when the cool night caused her to start shivering and a sandflee jumped onto her throat. It was time to go in, snuggle up to her living hot water bottle and get some shut eye!
    Read more

  • Day10

    6. Nachtlager in Praesto

    August 28 in Denmark

    Trotz der langen Fahrt sind wir rechtzeitig genug am Zeltplatz um zu duschen, aufzubauen und dann frisch und fröhlich in die Stadt zu gehen. Wir haben Lust auf eine kleine Hafenfahrt oder Stadtrundfahrt... Naja nach 17:30 Uhr geht das natürlich nicht mehr. Wir haben uns wirklich untouristische Orte ausgesucht.

    Da unser Zeltplatz eine Küche samt Wasserkocher hat, feiern wir bei Kerzenschein eine 5 Minuten Terrinen Party und gehen wie immer früh ins Bett.

    Da jede Zeltnacht eine Tierstory enthält sei gesagt, dass es fauchende Schreikröten zu geben scheint, die sich lauthals nachts unterhalten. Eine vor unserem und eine hinter unserem Zelt. Kersten hat es auch gehört, dann muss es stimmen.
    Read more

  • Day10

    INSELHOPPING

    August 28 in Denmark

    Schon die vierte Insel an nur einem Tag. Damit solls aber auch genug sein. Mich hat die Brücke emotional sehr ausgelaugt. Viel zu hoch, viel zu windig, viel zu viele Autos... Kersten fands toll wie ich so gehört habe.

  • Day11

    Fahrradpanne!

    August 29 in Denmark

    Meine Kette ist fast gerissen. Heldenkersten hat sie notdürftig geflickt, sodass wir den Weg zurück nach Praesto fahren konnten.

    Der Fahrradreparaturmann war sehr nett und sehr schnell. Er hat sich zwar darüber lustig gemacht wie ich 'Guten Tag' sage, aber okee.

You might also know this place by the following names:

Vordingborg Kommune

Join us:

FindPenguins for iOS FindPenguins for Android

Sign up now