France
South Corsica

Here you’ll find travel reports about South Corsica. Discover travel destinations in France of travelers writing a travel blog on FindPenguins.

96 travelers at this place:

  • Day10

    Corsica, France

    June 16, 2017 in France

    Corsica, less than an hour's ferry ride, and you get to speak a little French, or at least attempt to. The port of Bonifacio is where we entered Corsica....and what an entrance! The fortress walls dominated the view. We took the little tourist train up to the top of the fortress and old town . Great views from here. Perfect day for Alan's birthday!Read more

  • Day15

    Today, we left Bavella to make our way to the coast for a small crag right by the ocean. Mareike had seen it in our climbing guidebook and immediately loved the look of the climbs as well as the setting. Since there are just a few climbs and only two of them within our skill level, it was going to be an easy day with plenty of time to rest and enjoy the scenery. So far the theory :)

    We got there mid-day and immediately loved it. The climbing was mostly crack climbing. It looked super fun and hard at the same time, so we decided to set up a toprope (Leo was able to hike from the other side of the climb). Since the falls in toprope are so much shorter than on a lead climb, it is a lot less scary to do hard moves and makes climbing a lot easier mentally.

    Yet, this kind of climbing was totally new to Mareike - a lot of jamming your feet and hands in the crack and moving up one move at a time. She (and Leo from below) really had to push herself to trust those moves and keep climbing. So much fun to figure it out! She ended up climbing the harder climb three times and got more "graceful" each time :)

    Feeling great and well protected, we decided to venture out of our climbing comfort zone and try a 6a+ route, two levels above our hardest climb so far. It was a super challenging start but once Leo figured it out, he sent the route! Trying all sorts of moves for this hard route, we had totally lost track of time and realized the sun was setting already - what a full day of climbing fun! And we realized that we also finally learned what it means to run out of skin on our fingers ;)

    Since it was so late and we were tired, we decided to stay in a Bed and Breakfast. Such a good decision! It was an apatment attached to a lovely house up in the countryside. The owners Claude and Marie-France were the best, most friendly hosts and we had a few nice conversations in Mareike's broken French :)
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  • Day10

    Clanca Murata - T6 route

    May 27 in France

    After being forced into a seaside resort for the night due to a big rally car race around the Northern peninsula of Corsica, we spent the day in Bastia trying to figure out the most economical way to Bavella for climbing.

    Since buses don't make there way there until July and camping is a 10 minute drive away, we rented a car for 14€ a day. And yes, the car runs.

    In Bavella we took to the hills and spent a couple hours route finding our way up Clanca Murata. With no large packs today we were able to do some more intensive scramble climbing to the top.

    It was another great experience in route finding. There weren't any markers this time but we came across some old climbing bolts so we felt like we did a great job reading the rock.
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  • Day14

    Leo's pretend project

    May 31 in France

    We like to talk about having a project climb. Basically a climb that's one level above what you think you can climb and will take numerous attempts to complete. When we arrived in Bavella to climb we were 5b climbers (according to the French system). 5b is one of many climbing grades given to each route so you know whether you have a fighting chance to climb a route.

    While flipping through the guidebook in camp Leo saw a picture of a beautiful looking 5c route. "This should be our project". Mareike agreed that the route looked amazing and it was set, we had a project. This meant we would spend some time attempting the route, trying to reach the top figuring out the moves.

    The climb was a beautiful dihedral that had a couple slices running up the gut creating flakes to use as hands or foot jams. When we looked at the bottom of the climb the start was a great bouldery start (gymnastic type moves to get up). From there it was up a face and then you gain the final crack.

    As far as a project goes, well we both completed the climb first try. The start was a blast to figure out and took a series of about 5 moves to gain maybe a meter. Then after the first face, there was a large block to climb around/on top of using some holds underneath the block. At the top of the final crack we both agreed that after the last piece of protection you had to commit and make the final moves to the anchor.

    We've never felt so excited to finish a climb before. Both of us let out yells of excitement upon reaching the top. It might not have been a project, but we both agreed it was the funnest climb of the trip yet.
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  • Day16

    An actual rest day

    June 2 in France

    Today, we had a real rest day! We hiked up a stream to a 50m tall, narrow canyon with cascades running through. We set up our hammock by a little waterfall, slept in the sun, read our books, swam in the freeeeezing water, planned our next climbs, and enjoyed Corse pastries and fruits. Our bodies say thanks!Read more

  • Day14

    The three most important rules of mountaineering are...
    1. You don't have to make it to the top, but safely back down (so you can climb some more tomorrow).
    2. Every step is an important one.
    3. The best climber is the one having the most fun!

    Four days of climbing in Bavella made it easy to be "the best" climbers. We had such a fun time here in a most scenic setting! Often you could hear us singing made-up songs early in the mornings as we warm up our bodies and minds and hike up about 20 minutes from the road. Bavella's granite rock is quite grippy, which is helping us trust our feet and use smaller and smaller hand holds for balance. We're also graduating from slab climbs to more vertical climbs and consciously choose the routes that challenge us mentally and in technique for vertical face climbing.

    The area is huge and dotted with hundreds of climbs, so we follow our guidebook's advice and keep moving from crag to crag throughout the day. The first two days were mixed weather and we keep having to pack all our things and take breaks while we wait for the rock to dry again. The next 2 days are perfect weather - hazy sun with a cool breeze. Happy Liebstes!

    Meeting other climbers at our campsite and in the mountains usually makes us realize how much we have to learn yet and that we're still such beginners :) But even in just the four days here, plenty of the climbs we choose are pushing us to a new level of confidence on the rock. Leo's strengths are definitely in the climbs with large features that require a lot of technical moves - the climbs that Mareike thinks always look the most fun. My strength is more in the tiny features and balanced face climbs - the ones Leo usually thinks are terrifying . But we learn on every climb, mostly about each other, ourselves and how we can get stronger mentally to climb the funnest routes. One climb here was so fun, it deserves its own story (to follow).

    Tomorrow we're moving west to do a few climbs by the coast and then slowly move back North again. Bavella definitely offered the funnest outdoor climbing we've ever done!
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  • Day6

    Playing the GR20 game

    May 23 in France

    Feeling rested and -more importantly- dry, we start the day in sunshine! A nice change ;) spoiler: it doesn't stay dry all day though :D

    Our trail begins steep out of the forest and back on the rocky ridge line. The views from these ridges are so stunning and change from left to right and back. The fog still does its best to hide views here and there, but we get good peaks down the valleys and over more rocky mountain tops again and again. What a beautiful place we get to explore together!

    The fog keeps us playing another game, what we simply call "the GR20 game". Our trail mostly stays on the highest point of the mountain ridges and it's often mind blowing to see the rocky faces in front of you and to think there is a trail to go up them somewhere. The game is simple :)
    - the fog clears and you see a high, steep, rocky mountain ahead
    - you try to guess if the GR20 trail will go right over top it
    - the answer is usually yes :)

    Compared to the last few days, we start seeing more and more hikers on the trail, a few larger guided groups as well. At one section, we get to our first longer crossing over snow, which we do carefully and safely. One of the guides tries to steer his group above the snow and ends up in a much worse place, having his hikers go over a much steeper snow patch and a tricky downhill, just to join our snow trail in the end anyways.

    Of course, it wouldn't be a day of hiking in Corsica if it didn't end in more fog and rain though :) By now we've learnt and are much better at staying dry in our rain layers though! We follow the beautiful trail down into another forest and enjoy all the spring flowers of the season. We camp at a refugio in the middle of the forest and enjoy the rest of the day with other hikers and planning for the next day. Leo met two French hikers, one of which had fallen into a spiky bush and who had tens of splinters all over his hands. With his headlamp handy, he got to be surgery assistant for about half an hour or so. We both decide to be careful which bushes to fall into in the future ;)
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  • Day2

    Our journey begins today with a 3 hour bus ride south. It's crazy to think we'll be going on foot for days to make the same distance, slowly heading back north in the wilderness. Around noon we arrive in Conca, a small town on the foot of Corsica's southern mountains. We start our hike here, our backpacks filled with supplies for the next 14 days and our heads full of adventures to be had together.

    The downside of starting in the early afternoon is the extreme heat, it feels like we don't even need to be moving to start sweating right away :) The rocky trail starts in a young and bright green forest. After a few hours of uphill, there is a rock gap to walk through (picture 3), and we both agree it's like a rock gate into a new world - from here, we're secluded from street and city noises and surrounded by only rock, nature and the mountains. Just what we were looking for! :)

    We follow the white-red trail markings (picture 2) along small waterfalls and swimming holes and then lots more uphill all the way to our first camp spot with views all the way to the ocean. Because of the late start, we get there just in time to set up the tent before dark. Since we're exhausted and it's dark anyways, we decide to eat dinner inside the tent and pass out right after.
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  • Day8

    Ajaccio hat was (I)

    October 6 in France

    Als wir gestern in Ajaccio einfuhren, war die Freude beim Anblick der ersten Hochhäuser ziemlich getrübt. Ohje! Schön ist anders. Aber anders kam es dann doch: Die Ferienwohnung ruhig gelegen und sauber. Und der Hafen und seine Umgebung mit Markt richtig mediterran. Nach einer Geburtstagswanderung zum Iles Sanguinaires und einem leckerem Essen und einem Kurzbesuch bei Napoleon: Ein toller Tag!Read more

  • Day8

    Bonifacio, Frankreich

    September 6 in France

    We leave Calvi in the morning in direction Ajaccio to see the museum about Napoleon Bonaparte, who has been born here. It is very crowded in this city and we couldn't find a parking lot anywhere. So we leave that city again and go to the Camping Trinité just a few kilometers away from Bonifacio from where we are taking the ferry to Sardinia. We stay overnight in a nice hut. From its terrace we have an great view to Bonifacio and the harbour.Read more

You might also know this place by the following names:

Département de la Corse-du-Sud, Departement de la Corse-du-Sud, Südkorsika, South Corsica, Córcega del Sur, Corse-du-Sud, Liamone, Corsica del Sud, Córsega do Sul

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